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February 20, 1987 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-02-20
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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MICH.ELLANY

FILM
Sylvester Stallone: From critical acclaim to c

When news about an aquaintance is bad

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INTERVIEW
Tom Monaghan
Domino's founder is busy with the Tigers,
architecture, Marcel Marceau - and pizza
Native Ann Arborite Tom Monaghan has watched his Domino's Pizza
chain grow from one outlet in Ypsilanti to several thousand stores around
the world. Monaghan, who owns the Detroit Tigers, also has 1,700 acres
of land northeast of Ann Arbor where he plans to build a Marcel Marceau
Mime school, a Frank Lloyd Wright Arts Center, and other developments
in addition to Domino's recently completed World Headquarters.
Monaghan spoke on the phone with Daily staff writer Carrie Loranger.
Daily: What is this I hear about you wanting to build a new baseball
stadium for the Tigers in Ann Arbor?
Monaghan: A reporter asked me that, but it had never even occurred to
me until he brought it up.
D: So you want to keep the Tigers in Detroit?
M: Well, I don't have any choice because the lease goes until about the
turn of the century with the stadium in Detroit. Then I can probably do
whatever I want with them. It just never occurred to me to leave Detroit.
I think they belong there.
D: Do you go to all the Tiger games?
M: No, I probably go to about 15 or 20 games a year.
D: How is the Marcel Marceau mime school coming along?
M: That's up in the air, a lot of that has to do with zoning which is up
to the township. So we really don't have a lot of control over that.
D: Do you want just a mime school, or would it be a whole arts center?
M: Well it would go beyond mime, but mime would be the main thrust
of it. This is all Marcel's project. I think he wants to bring a lot of the
related arts in too.
D: Would he actually be teaching?
M: Yes, he would spend six months a year in Ann Arbor.
D: What other ideas does he have for the school?
M: Probably dancing - ballet, and music. He feels that they are all
associated. I am not a mime expert. I got started in this because of my
friend Eugene Powers. He is the one that brought this idea to me. We are
interested in doing things that will enhance the summer festival, which is
also one of Mr. Powers' projects. The summer festival is the one that
Marcel Marceau has been coming to every summer. We are happy to do
anything that can help Mr. Powers program, so it might end up being
some kind of a cultural center.
D: What other developments do you have planned for the land?
M: We have our car collection, which is one of the finest in the country
now, but it is in an obscure area of Ann Arbor on the other side of town
in a warehouse. We want to bring that here and we hope to break ground
on that building in a couple of months.
D: How many cars do you have?
See INTERVIEW, Page 9

LATELY I'VE BEEN THINKING
a lot about Jae Kim. He is a former
student of the University of Mich-
igan, and a former member of the,
photography staff of this news-
paper. Last week, he pleaded guilty
to one count of assault and battery,
and one count of fourth degree
criminal sexual conduct.
I never knew Jae that well. He
was what I would term a good
acquaintance. We talked occasion-
ally about music, or photography. I
thought the photo he took of Mot-
ley Crue last year was one of the
best concert photos I've ever seen.
But even though I didn't know
Jae that well, I probably would
have stood up for him if somebody
had called him a jerk. After all, Jae
had always been nice to me, and he
had done good work for the paper.
And to a degree, I was willing
to defend Jae when I read about him
being charged. While I could think
of no circumstances under which I
could excuse sexual assault, I forced
myself to consider Jae innocent
until he was proven guilty. It was
not wholly inconceivable that two
women with some sort of vendetta
had set Jae up, it was just highly
improbable.
OFF THE WALL
Olympus 135 would like to make it
with a Nikon. Leave time and place.
-Student Publications Building
THIS STATE OF UNCONSCIOUS
AWARENESS IS APALLING
(in reply)
I've thought that many times.
-Graduate Library
Does anyone learn here?
(in reply)
U-M doesn't teach... they feed.
(in reply)
U-M teaches. It's yur respon -
sibility to learn.
(in reply)
Oh my, an idealist.
-C.C. Little
If you choose not to decide, you
still have made a choice.
-Graduate Library
I want somebody who will care for
me passionately
Know my innermost thoughts
Know my intimate details
-Depeche Mode
(in reply)
Why? Wouldn't you feel redundant?
-Mason Hall
Fighting for peace is like fucking
for virginity!
-Graduate Library

But things got worse. On
'Friday, February 6, the Daily re-
ported that Jae was arraigned "on
charges of larceny and possessing a
set of license plates not issued for
his vehicle. LSA Sophomore Jae
Kim pleaded not guilty to stealing
camera equipment valued at $1500
from the Student Publications
Building." The Student Publi-
cations Building is us. Even though
the theft charge was dropped, as part
of a plea-bargain, some of my
friend Scott's camera equipment
spent a week as evidence.
Even then, I tried to imagine
ways that I might be able to forgive
Jae. If Jae was innocent of the first
charges, then perhaps the second
group could be written off as the
desperate acts of a desperate man.
Well, all that rationalizing and
excuse-making was wasted. And
now I find myself going through an
uncomfortable distancing process,

and wondering whether I'm not
being somehow hypocritical. One
the one hand, I'd walk across the
street to avoid talking with Jae,
because I find the things he did
inexcusable, and I probably would
never have become friendly with Jae
had I known that he was capable of
doing such things. On the other
hand, perhaps I should tell him.
Perhaps he ought to hear how
betrayed people who knew him feel.
And just who was the friendly,
easy-going Jae that I met, and
worked with? Was that just a
facade, or is it time for me to
recognize that people capable of
nasty acts are regular folks for a
good seven-eighths of every day?
Before this, I naively thought that I
could tell whether someone had the
kind of problems Jae has, I thought
I could spot them a mile away.
I wonder whether it is fair for
me to turn my back on Jae to the
degree that I have. I have a lot of
friends who have done things which
I find morally bothersome. Hell,
some of the morally bothersome
things were done to me. Many of
my friends are uncharged criminals,
who have possessed or sold illegal
See LOGIE, Page 9

PRINT FROM THE PAST

By John Shea
"All I wanna do is go the
distance."
-Rocky
IF HOLLYWOOD IS the land of
dreams, then Sylvester Stallone is
its epitome. Stallone. You hear the
name, you think of the dreams. Of
fighting men twice your size in the
ring and winning, or mowing down
the entire Viet Cong army, all
while waving the American flag.
Biceps pumping, a flame-thrower
strapped across his shoulder, Stal-
lone is an embodiment of the image
that America likes to present to the
world, and believe in themselves;
an invincible super-power, over-
coming improbable odds to win.
Stallone is our alter ego, and
audiences love watching it.
This works out well, because
Stallone loves playing the part. He
is Hollywood's one-trick pony. Of
the twelve films in which Stallone
has starred, six have been either
Rocky or Rambo, while five others
closely resemble the Rocky/Rambo
genre. This hasn't made him the
critic's darling, but in all fairness,
it's not a bad trick. These twelve
films have grossed over $450
million and made Stallone the
leading male box-office attraction of
the eighties and something of a
symbol for the indomitable
American spirit. What red-blooded
American wouldn't go for that?
You can't blame him.
"A ring? A ring? What the hell
do you need a ring for? Aw, geez..."
-The Lords of Flatbush
But maybe, just maybe, we
would've never even heard of
Sylvester Stallone if it wasn't for
the 1974 film, The Lords of
Flatbush. Stallone had been strug-
gling as an actor, peddling off
movie scripts to anyone who'd look
at them, when this opportunity
came along. It was a quiet little
slice-of-life picture, and Stallone
gave a beautifully understated per-
formance, void of flag waving and
flame-throwing. The money he
earned from The Lords of Flatbush
enabled him to go to JHollywood,
and there he made a pitch to
producers for Rocky. Nobody was
interested at first, but finally United
Artists nibbled and Rocky Balboa
was born. The film earned critical
acclaim, captured the imaginations
of audiences around the country and
eventually won the Best Picture
Oscar of 1976.
Stallone touched so many people
because they could relate to his
character on the screen, and the

--
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Over The Top, Stallone's
latest picture, is about
armwrestling. Needless to
say, it's afar cry from the
more exciting days of the
original Rocky Balboa..

Lincoln Hawk (Stallone) battles "Bull" Hurley (Rick Zumwalt) for the World Armwrestling Championship.

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The Law Library received afive-story addition to its south wing in the
mid-1950s, one that was subsequently criticized for clashing with the
quadrangle's original architecture.
THE DAILY ALMANAC

struggle he went through to better
his life, to make something of
himself. The character was pro-
foundly human. We related; we
cared. And Stallone's portrayal of
Rocky Balboa was nothing short of
outstanding. Ten years ago, many
considered him one of the best
actors in Hollywood.
"Tell me something, sir. Do we
get to win this time?"
-Rambo, First Blood Part II
Unfortunately, few can maintain
a high artistic level and still hit it
big at the box-office, and some-
where along the line Sylvester
decided money was more important
that art. He's probably not sorry
about the decision. Maybe he
shouldn't be. But buried beneath all
the Rambo Its and Rocky Ills is a
good actor, with the potential to be
a great one. Yes. Sylvester Stal-
lone. He has an extraordinary screen
presence, dominating it like no one

since Marlon Brando, and yet he
displays a broad range of emotions
when called upon for a scene
without a machine gun. Stallone is
an underrated actor, and he laments
those who chastise him, but I guess
that's what you get for playing
Rocky and Rambo eleven times.
In a perverse sense, Stallone's
latest film, Over the Top, can be
seen as some sort of an attempt for
reconcilation between himself and
his critics, but it comes off as a
half-hearted one. In this variation of
the Rocky theme, he plays Lincoln
Hawk, an independent truck driver
who left his wife and son many
years ago, only to come back when
his wife (Susan Blakely) is dying of
cancer. She dies, and a struggle
ensues between Hawk and his
multi-millionaire father-in-law, Ja-
son Culter (Robert Loggia) for the
custody of son Michael (David
Mendenhall).
Because Hawk left the family

and has little money, Culter
believes he will win the custody
case in court. The only way Hawk
can keep his son is to sell his rig,
take the money and bet on himself
to win the World Arm-Wrestling
championship in Las Vegas, where
he arm-wrestles opponents named
"Big Bill" and "Bull." Guys who
drink motor oil and like it.
Can Hawk overcome the
impossible odds? Can he win the
love of his son? Can he win the
contest so he can start his own
trucking business? You can almost
hear the theme from Rocky in the
background. It's a familiar story,
with the same questions; it's just in
a different - and far less en-
grossing - ring. In reviewing this,
I don't want to simply stick my
nose up in the air and say Over the
Top wasn't quite as good as Out of
Africa. It wasn't, but that doesn't
matter. Stallone no longer strives
for that. It's the dream. That's what

50 years ago - February 20,
1937: The Daily's front page
contained these items:
Health Services acting director
Margaret Bell issued the surprising
claim that instances of colds and
influenza increase during the month
of January.
Detroit Postmaster Rosco B.

Huston filed a voluntary petition
for bankruptcy in court, listing
debts of $710,000 and assets of
$1,532.
University President Ruthven
and a political science professor
were attending the convention of
the American Philosophical Society
in Philadelphia.

PAGE 8

WEEKEND/FEBRUARY 20, 1987

WEEKEND/FEBRUARY 20, 1987

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