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February 18, 1987 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1987-02-18

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, February 18, 1987
Research News records
work of 'U' scientists

(Continued from Page 1)
because "we think of our readers as
being a diverse group of people."
THE News has an off-campus
mailing list of 7,500, out of that
number, faculty and staff receive
5,500 copies, according to
Katterman. The Union, the League,
and Borders Bookstore on State St.
receive 50 copies each. "There are a
lot of people who do know and care
about it," Katterman said, adding

that the mailing list expands by 50
to 100 people every month.
The News is published six times
per year, in a two-color, 18-page
magazine format. Each issue
contains stories about a single
broad area of research, usually
involving several University
departments. The "Spotlight"
section, which focuses on another
topic, usually takes up two to three
pages.

"There's a place for everything,"
said Rueter, "and we try to write
about everything." In the summer,
she said, the News will run a
political science topic about U.S.-
Soviet relations, and in the fall, the
magazine will focus on the
National Institute of Health's 100th
anniversary.
To find topics, Katterman said,
he and Rueter follow DRDA's
annual research proposal awards, or
they simply contact one of the
departments for its "most exciting
research project."
ThehNews was started in 1948 as
a monthly two-page newsletter for
the Engineering Research Institute,
which later became DRDA. In
PENROD'S PARTY TOURS
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LOWEST AT U-M

Katterman
... edits Research News
1950, it was distributed campus-
wide; it assumed its current name in
1961.
Alan Price, interim associate
vice president for research, said the
News gives an "in-depth,
intellectual look at a topic of
current interest. It's a good
educational vehicle for laypeople or
people who do not have a
knowledge of science."

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IN BRIEF
Compiled from Associated Press reports
Vietnam releases 12 ministers
BANGKOK, Thailand - Vietnam said yesterday it had dismissed 12
government ministers in what analysts saw as an effort to bring in
specialists who can revive the communist nation's moribund economy.
One of the most sweeping political housecleanings in Vietnam's
history follows a tide of self-criticism and the resignations last
December of three top party leaders.
The official Voice of Vietnam radio announced the purge of the
Council of Ministers and said the elections will be held April 19 for
members of the eighth National Assembly. Among the ministers
dismissed was Gen. Van Tien Dung, who planned the final 1975
offensive against South Vietnam.
More leadership changes are expected in conjunction with the
elections, including choice of a new premier to replace 80-year-old
Pham Van Dong, although the assembly itself has little power.
Soviets may release dissident
MOSCOW - The Soviet government announced yesterday that two
more dissidents have been ordered released from prison and that Jewish
activist Josef Begun is likely to be freed.
If they are released, it would be in line with Kremlin actions to free
dissidents whose imprisonment has been an obstacle to better Soviet
relations with the West. Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev has launched
a liberalization drive and has said the Soviet Union is changing its
approach to human rights "for all to see."
Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennady Gerasimov said the
government has ordered the release of Anatoly Koryagin and Alexander
Ogorodnikov and will "most likely" free Begun.
Experts question rocket
flaw in Challenger disaster
SPACE CENTER, Houston - Exactly one year before shuttle
flights are scheduled to resume, experts continue to question the way
NASA is correcting the rocket flaw that caused the Challenger disaster.,
The new booster design and its testing have come under attack from
Congress, from industry experts and from astronauts whose lives will
depend upon the solid-fueled rocket engine.
NASA officials and engineers from Morton Thiokol Inc.,
manufacturer of the rocket, say they remain confident the new design.
will pass critical firing tests scheduled to begin this summer.
Challenger exploded 73 seconds after launch on Jan. 28, 1986,
killing its seven-member crew. A presidential commission that
investigated said the accident was caused by a solid rocket booster joint'
that leaked, allowing superheated flame to ignite a rocket fuel tank.
Ford's profits hit $3.3 billion
DETROIT - Ford Motor Co. reported yesterday nearly $3.3 billion.
in 1986 profits, surpassing industry-leader General Motors Corp. and
Chrysler Corp. and making Ford the only Big Three automaker to
increase year-to-year profits.
Ford, the nation's No. 2 automaker, said it earned $3.29 billion, or
$12.32 a share, on record worldwide sales of $62.7 billion in 1986.
That was a 31 percent increase over Ford's 1985 earnings of $2.5
billion, or $9.09 a share, on sales of $52.7 billion. Ford said it will
announce the amount of 1986 profit-sharing for employees today.
Both GM and Chrysler reported two weeks ago that their profits
declined in 1986 from 1985 levels.
EXTRAS
Shenanigans delay council
meeting, irritate Pierce
Some less than normal occurrences happened at the Ann Arbor
City Council meeting Monday night. The meeting itself began almost
a half-hour late because not enough councilmembers showed up,
which prompted Mayor Ed Pierce to suggest that the starting times of
the executive session, which is held 30 minutes before the general
council meeting, and the regular meeting be pushed back 30 minutes,
to 7:30 and 8 p.m., respectively.
That wasn't the only thing irritating Pierce Monday. During the
public hearing session, Bart Casad, a local artist, requested the council
to think about supporting an "unconvention center." Casad said new
construction downtown has replaced some of the places where artists
worked and relaxed and the new center would become a gathering place
for artists. The center would include a gallery and cafe.

Casad had 30 seconds remaining for his presentation when he
pulled out a ukelele and began to sing a song calling for unification of
opposing sides in disputes ranging from the local to the international.
When Pierce told him time was up, Casad continued to sing, taking
time from the next scheduled speaker.
Needless to say, Pierce was not amused.
by Michael Lustig
Jhe M*iciigan Baigl
Vol. XCVII -No.99
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One
term-$10 in town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and sub -
scribes to Pacific News Service and the Los Angeles Times Syndicate.

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Editor in Chief...............................ROB EARLE
Managing Editor..........................AMY MINDELL
News Editor..............................PHILIP I. LEVY
Features Editor..........................MELISSA BIRKS
NEWS STAFF: Elizabeth Atkins, Eve Becker, Steve
Blonder, Rebecca Blumenstein, Jim Bray, Brian Bonet,
Scott Bowles, Paul Henry Cho, Dov Cohen, Rebecca
Cox, Hampton Dellinger, Leslie Eringaard, Martin
Frank, Pam Franklin, Stephen Gregory, Edward
Kleine, Steve Knopper, Vibeke Laroi, Carrie Loranger,
Michael Lustig, Jerry Markon, Edwin McKean, Andy
Mills, Gary Mull, Eugene Pak, Faith Permick, Martha
Sevetson, Wendy Sharp, Louis Stancato, Steven Tuch,
David Webster, Jennifer Weiss, Rose Mary Wunmel
Opinion Page Editors..................PETER MOONEY
HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Muzamil Ahmed, Tim
Bennett, Peter Ephross, Paul Honsinger, Tim Huet,
Lisa Jordan, Jeffrey Rutherford, Caleb Southworth,
Mark Williams.
Arts Editors..........................REBECCA CHUNG
SETH FLICKER
Books.......................SUZANNE MISENCIK
Features................................ALAN PAUL
*Fim..................................KURT SERBUS
Music.................................BETH FERTIG
Theatre......................LAUREN SCHREIBER
ARTS STAFF: V. J. Beauchamp, Lisa Berkowitz,

Sports Editor.........................SCOTT G. MILLER
Associate Sports Editors...............DARREN JASEY
RICK KAPLAN
GREG MOLZON
ADAM OCHLIS
JEFF RUSH
SPORTS STAFF: Adam Benson, Jim Downey, Liam
Flaherty, Allen Gelderloos, Chris Gordillo, Shelly
Haselluhn, Al Hedblad, Julie Hollman, John Husband,
Rob Levine, Jill Marchiano, Adam Schefter, Adam
Schrager, Scott Shaffer, Pete Steinert, Douglas Volan,
Bill Zolla.
Photo Editors...........................SCOT LITUCHY
ANDI SCHREIBER
PHOTO STAFF: Leslie Boorstein, Karen Handelman,
Dana Mendelssohn, John Munson, Darrian Smith,
Grace Tsai Kathryn Wright.
Business Manager........MASON FRANKLIN
Sales Manager............................DIANE BLOOM
Finance Manager...............REBECCA LAWRENCE
Classified Manager...................GAYLE SHAPIRO
Assistant Sales Manager..................ANNE KUBEK
Assistant Classified Manager................AMY EIGES
DISPLAY SALES: Karen Brown, Kelly Crivello, Irit
Elrad, Missy Hambrick, Ginger Heyman, Denise Levy,
Wendy Lewis, Jason Liss, Laura Martin, Mindy
Mendonsa, Scott Metcalf, Carolyn Rands, Jimmy

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