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January 09, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-01-09

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 9, 1987 - Page 5
'U' Cellar closing leaves students in big bind
By TOM MACKINNON year's book rush. pressure. Noble and had all six bought back. classes, I couldn't get any books at added. Some students emulated
he recent demise of the "The real rush is just starting," The market shift has produced "They bought my thinner. paper all." Boxer's strategy of buying their
ersity Cellar has caused a said Paul Rosser, manager of long lines, frustrating students who backs for a dollar, and I got 18 books after fall term finals. Others
iess boom at area bookstores, Ulrich's bookstore. Rosser said he know they can't get around buying dollars for my astronomy "Then again, I bought my use stall tactics, deciding to wait
ome students are complaining expects a 25 percent increase in their books. textbook," he said. books before vacation, so I didn't until the lines die down to buy their
, i d hvin difficult sales during book rush as a result of "WP hnvP to hnv hnni k nd When it came time to buv his run into much of a crowd," he books.

Tf
Univ
pusin
but S
^fc l f.

oI long ones anU IVz g y LI.UILJ
selling their books back.
"We've more than doubled our
inventory," said Jerry Maloney,
general manager of Barnes and
Nble bookstore in the basement of
the Michigan Union. He said he has
hiyed around 20 percent more
employees than he had for last

the University Cellar's closing.
The University Cellar, he said,
had 30 to 40 percent of the
textbook market before its closing.
The student-run store, established in
1971 after campus-wide protests
demanding a low-cost student
bookstore, folded due to financial,

VY v aeo U NV UIIUUUS Ua
there are only two places to get
them in this town," said Anne
Gellhausen. "The prices are about
the same anywhere I go -
outrageous."
But others were more successful.
LSA Freshman Jon Pollack
returned six books to Barnes and

books, however, Pollack was not
so happy. "Out of all the books I
needed, I was only able to get one
of them at Barnes and Noble. I then
went to Ulrichs, were after waiting
in line for twenty minutes, I was
able to get a hold of one fourth of
all the books I needed. For two

A uaa aaaav

Baby boomers reach
maturity in the 1980s

Ann Arbor residents will travel to Nicaragua

(Continued from Page 1)
in. wealth. This project gets to the
root of one of the greatest issues
th, world faces. If I can help
alleviate the problem in a small
whay, it would be a treasure."
, -Milbauer also pledged her
dedication to the project. "I feel
every individual has a responsibility
to ,the world. Domestic programs
like Medicade and Welfare have
been used to fund an illegal war in
Nicaragua. My duty is to counteract

WASHINGTON (AP) - The
Baby Boom generation that seemed
to dominate the nation as children
and teen-agers now constitutes
nearly one-third of America's
population as it nears middle age,
the Census Bureau reported
yesterday.
"The 17.6 percent increase in the
25-44 age group makes it the

fastest growing age segment of the
population of the 1980s," the
bureau said.
The group comprised 73.8
million people as of July 1, 1985,
or 30.9 percent of the population,
according to the new Census report,
"State Population and Household
Estimates to 1985, with Age and
Components of Change."

it. It is a message of peace and hope
to Nicaraguans. It is a true effort for
peace."
Residential college senior Tony
Mack joined other members in
outrage against the Reagan
administration. He also is
motivated by a personal sense of
responsibility. "We have inherited a
lot of positive things because we
have exploited other countries. We
also have inherited guilt with it,"

he said.
Though some members know
the Spanish language, they expect
most of their training to come from
experience. Claudia Green, a
University graduate, studied and
worked in Nicaragua for four
months in 1985. "There is so much
you learn," she said. "You will
never be quiet again about the
policies of the U.S. It is a concrete
way to learn about Nicaragua. "

AMISTAD has raised $28,000
from Ann Arbor residents since
being founded in October of 1985.
The money will be used to buy
tools for construction.
UM News in
The Daily
764-0552

E
s

BORDERING
ON
OBNOXIOUS

FILMS:
at the Michigan Theater
WELCOME BACK
Come see a great film in the Newly
restored Michigan Theater.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7
Have a rockin' evening!,
7:15 ROCK AROUND THE CLOCK
9:00 JAIL HOUSE ROCK
FRIDAY, JANUARY 9
All-time classic
7:00, 9:15 & 11:30 CASABLANCA
SATURDAY & SUNDAY, JANUARY 10 & 11.-
Big screen spectacular.
GONE WITH THE WIND
Call for times.
ALSO film shorts featuring Betty Boop and American
film funny man Robert Benchely shown with each fea-
ture and a theater organ prelude. Camp fun on campus!
For program information call 668-8480.
See all these great films projected on the large screen in the historic
Michigan Theater. Call 668-8397 for more information. Admission to
films is $3.50 for a double bill or a single bill. Students and senior
citizens $2.75. Tickets go on sale one-half hour before showtime.

Well, not really obnoxious, just very enthusiastic about the
U of M! The College of Literature, Science and the Arts is in-
terviewing students to work for an alumni fundraising tele-
thon. The LS&A Phonathon runs five nights a week from
February 1 to April 2 - with time out for Spring Break. You
will be able to select the two nights out of the five you wish to
work with some opportunity to work additional nights.
PART-TIME EMPLOYMENT
Hours: 6:30 - 9:30
Pay: $4.00 / hr. plus bonus
LSA Students Preferred
The University of Michigan is an Equal Opportunity, Affirmative Action Employer

WHO' SAID CHRISTMAS WAS OVER?

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Advance orders will be taken beginning January 5, 1987.
pick up a supplementary information packet at:

Check your mail for details or

*Any computing Center public facility, such as UNYN, NUBS or the
Undergraduate Library;
*The Microcomputer Education Center, School of Education Building;
*Photo and Campus Services, LS&A Building;
eCampus Information Center, Michigan Union.

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