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February 12, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Magazine returns
after year's hiatus

The Michigan Daily - Thursday, February 12, 1987 - Page 5
Ex-student pleads guilty

(Continued from Page 1)
Perry, then only a first-year
student, contacted about 50 students
who expressed interest in the
magazine. But when she held an
organizational meeting early this
year, only a handful showed up.
Still, there were enough students
to put out the first issue in
Oetober, although Perry admits that
it was not perfect, containing some
typographical errors.
"You don't want to see that
issue," she joked.
For the January/February issue
of Black Perspectives - the third
and latest issue - Perry contacted a
local graphic designer and
Uiniversity alumnus, Bev Hunter, to
help design and layout the paper.
The result was the sharpest and
sleekest issue yet.
PERRY AND the rest of the
staff hope to continue improving
Black Perspectives. Plans include
increasing the number of pages,
isues produced, issues printed, and
in the future perhaps making it a
niagazine for all minority students.
"We do have future plans, but

we have to go slow, we're not all
that set financially now," Perry
said. She said they will hold fund-
raisers and may begin selling adver-
tising space.
The staff is still relatively small
and has no formal office yet. The
seven-to-eight member staff meets
in East Quad's Abeng lounge.
I Consequently, staffers have had
to assume different roles: writing,
editing, taking photographs, doing
lay-outs, printing, and even
distributing the magazine.
"Since we have a limited staff
number, we all have to share these
responsibilities until we can
expand," said Rob Silver, a photo-
grapher and writer.
Silver and other staffers praise
Perry for the work she has done.
"She's done a real good job,"
said Silver. "And with all her
responsiblities, she handles the
rapport between the staff well and
knows how to deal with the
problems that come up."
And although their operation is
not large in scale or number yet,
Black Perspective staffers feel that

By STEVE BLONDER
Under the terms of an arranged
plea bargain, former University
student Jae Kim pleaded guilty to
one count of assault and battery,
one count of fourth degree criminal
sexual conduct, and improper use of
a license plate yesterday before
Fifteenth District Judge Pieter
Thomassen.
Kim withdrew from the Uni-
versity last week.
In exchange for the guilty plea,
the prosecution agreed to drop the
remaining criminal sexual conduct
charge and a larceny charge facing
Kim. The prosecution also agreed
not to charge Kim for any of the
other reported incidents for which
he had not been charged. Sentencing
was set for March 3.

Kim was arrested last week after
two female students living in Mary
POLICE
NOTES
Markley residence hall identified
him as their assailiant. He later
recieved the larceny. charge after
camera equipment reported missing
from 420 Maynard St. was found in
Kim's car. The license plates on
Kim's car were also found to be
stolen.
All three charges are mis-

demeanors and the combined
maximum penalty is two and one-
half years in orison and a $700 fine.
Don't forget
to
pick up
your
Michigan Daily

Perry
.. . edits new magazine

the magazine is important.
"We're doing something pos-
itive," said Amyre Loomis, a
photographer and writer. "Helping
to expose the rest of the campus to
our events, to black people in
general."
They printed 500 copies of the
latest issue, distributing them in
the Center for Afro-American
Studies lounges and minority
residence hall lounges. The next
issue is due in March.

INTERNSHIPS
in
JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE
Placements available in communications, research and planning,
education, health care, and social services. Stipend granted to each
intern.
For further information and application contact immediately: Ellen
Hyson Schein, Hillel-College Age Youth Services, 1 S. Franklin St.,
Chicago, IL 60606, (312) 346-6700, Ext. 2506, or stop by the Sum-
mer Job Fair on Feb. 17th and meet a representative of the program.

Students combine to combat
recent racist incidents

By PAUL HENRY CHO
A group of about 100 students, angry about
continuing racist incidents at the University, have
formed an ad hoc committee to combat racism.
An incident at Couzens Hall, in which a racist flier
was anonymously placed under the door to a room
where black women were meeting, was "the last
straw" in a series of racist attacks, according to David
Shannon, one of the organizers of the anti-racism
rally that occurred last Friday.
As a result, ten students formed the committee to
address the problem of racism at the University.
The ad hoc committee met Tuesday to discuss
goals and demands, and the method in which change
and public attention to the issue was to occur. Several
students shared their experiences with racism and
attacks they encountered at the University.
The committee made several demands of the
University administration, including a formal public
condemnation of the Couzens incident by interim
University President James Duderstadt, a University
investigation of the incident, and an apology from and
reprimand of resident advisors for insensitivity in
handling the issue:

"Basically, we are all just getting sick and tired of
the racist incidents, and now we're going to do
something about it." said Michael-Jay Walker,
another of the rally's organizers. "We're going to
have to bring to the attention of all students what is
going on, expose racism and ignorance, and confront
it."
The committee also hopes to institute an anti-
racism program at freshman orientation, which would
inform incoming students that racism will not be
tolerated on campus.
The students hope to expose racism by publicizing
racist incidents that continually occur at the Uni-
versity, in addition to supporting ongoing minority
goals such as increased financial aid and attaining 10
percent black enrollment.
According to Barbara Ransby, one of the leaders at
the meeting, the new committee is not the result of
efforts of the Black Student Union or the Free South
Africa Coordinating Committee. Rather, she said, it
is simply a group of concerned students who feel that
racism is something that cannot be tolerated at the
University.
"People need to realize that we're serious and that
this is not going to blow over," Shannon said.

The Universiy Activities Center presentation of
Impact JazzDance

in Performance

February 12 13 14

8:00 Pm..

Mendelssohn Theatre

Michigan League
For more information call 763-1107

Tickets S3.00/advance $3.50/door

Available at the Michigan Union Ticket Office

.. i ..?

LSA picks new associate deans

(Continued from Page 1)
Budget, Carolyn Copeland, holds a
permanent position. Steiner said
that there are about 70 faculty
positions to fill, with a 30-40
faculty turnover rate each year.
"What the University looks like
in 2010 depends on who we hire
over the next five years," Steiner
said.
Cross said he will phase out his
responsibilities with MHRI over

the next three years in order to con-
centrate attention on his new job as
well as teaching economics. "Three
appointments are more than anyone
can handle," Cross said.
Neither Cross nor Ford, who is
currently on sabbatical, has learned
the details of their jobs yet, but
both are experienced members of
the University's faculty.
Cross, who has been with the
University since 1965, co-authored

a book called Social Traps in 1980
with Melvin Guyer, an associate
professor of psychology. The book
deals with counter-productive hu-
man behavior such as drug abuse,
air pollution, and cigarette smok-
ing.
Ford has served at the University
since 1971. During that time, he
was the Director of the Museum of
Anthropology. Ford is also an
archaeologist and botany professor.

16 The Michigan Daily
1 1
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4. Deadline: One business day prior to publication by 11:30 a.m.
1 For more information, call 764-0557
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Kenneth Higgins
University of Michigan .
1st Team Football "

Businesse
4.08 GPA "
Senior .
Creek, Ml.

Hometown: Battlet

Congratulations to the GTE Academic All-Americans.
They are the leaders of the team. But what makes them even more special is their outstanding

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