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February 09, 1987 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-02-09

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, February 9, 1987 - Page 3

Diag rally fights

'U'

By DAVID WEBSTER
Speakers at a Diag rally on
Friday demanded that the University
issue an official condemnation of a
recent racist incident in Couzens
dorm. They also criticized Univ-
ersity administrators for failing to
effectively combat racism on cam-
pus.
Barbara Ransby, a leader of the
Free South Africa Coordinating
Committee (FSACC), said some
FSACC members are considering
filing a law suit against the Univ-
ersity for civil rights violations.
Ransby told an audience of about
300 that a series of racial incidents
have made it impossible for blacks
to get an education at the Univ-

ersity.
Two weeks ago, a group of
black women were holding an
informal meeting in a student
lounge at Couzens. After the
women were interrupted by some
individuals asking to use the
lounge, a phony letter from the
department of wildlife and fisheries
in Ohio was slipped under the door
of the lounge. The flier declared "an
open (hunting) season on porch
monkeys," and referred to blacks as
saucerlips, jungle bunnies, and
spooks.
Following a march from
Couzens to the Diag, members of
student organizations spoke to the
crowd from the steps of the

Graduate Library. They urged
students to fight racism both at the
University and on a national level.
As approximately 120 marchers
neared the Diag, they joined hands
and chanted "The people united will
never be defeated."
"You've got to let the racist
know that he or she is the
problem," said Brett Stockdill, an
LSA senior. "Look inside your-
selves. Look at your professors,
your teaching assistants, your
friends. Look for racism and
confront it."
At the rally, speakers announced
plans for addressing racism on
campus. Paul McNaughton, the

r
racism
Couzens building director, said the
housing division has drafted a letter
to students and staff stating that
racism will not be tolerated in the
dorms.
Ransby, who called the Univ-
ersity Board of Regents "an elitist
group of white men," hopes to
discuss ways of fighting racism
with Vice President and Provost
James Duderstadt, currently serving
as interim University president.
These include creating a mechanism
to log the occurence of racial
incidents on campus.
"We want to embarrass Vice
President Duderstadt for not taking
a stronger stand against racism,"
Ransby said.

Women 's studies

Daily Photo by GRACE TSAI
Greg Marks, Deputy Provost of the Information Technology Division,
goes Krogering. Well, not quite. Kroger lent the University it's shopping
carts for Computer Weekend at Old Main Hospital.
Com uter Weekends

By REBECCA COX
Students, faculty, and staff broke
Apple Computers sales records
during the Computer Weekend
pickup. More than 2000 computers
filled part of a cafeteria in Old Main
Hospital this weekend, waiting to
be picked up or bought.
According to Lisa Goldman,
head of the Educational Sales
Division at the Apple Computer
World Headquarters in California, it
was "the largest single delivery of
Apple Computers to one site at one
time in the last ten years."
"It was a little eerie. You could
hear the boxes creaking," said Greg
Marks, deputy provost of the
University Information Technology
Division, of the computers before
the pickup started. Marks organized
Sthe computer weekend project.
The record-breaking weekend was
a cooperative effort involving the
University, Apple Computers, Mic-.
rosoft, and three of the four local
Apple dealers.
kABOUT 1700 of the 2000
computers were taken; of the extra
300 ordered, a few dozen were
purchased on the spot. The,

University offered four computer
packages at 52 percent off retail
price. Packages ranged in price from
$1,420 to $2,550.
Most people, like LSA soph-
omore Matt Johan, were picking up
their first computer. "I'm basically
going to use it for word pro-
cessing," said Johan, who plans to
concentrate in English.
But some students were buying
their second. "I've got one, I'm
going to have two," said Tony
Winkler, a freshman in the Engin-
eering college.
During the busiest period
Saturday afternoon, it took buyers
about 45 minutes to steer their carts
through the hospital's corridors. It
took only 21 minutes at other
times, Marks said.
Assistants in yellow t-shirts
helped customers pick up their
computers and register them, buy
software, make sure the computers
were in working order, and finally,
have their computer-laden carts
delivered to their cars. Buyers also
filled out surveys on the quality of
the service.
"You could teach Disneyland a
thing or two," one survey response
said.

seeks mal
By JENNIFER WEISS
In some women's studies classes
at the University, there are five men
for fifty-five women. But male
students say discussing women's
issues can be worth the initial
"culture shock" of attending a pre-
dominantly female class.
"It makes you question some of
the values in our society. It's the
vehicle with which one can tran-
scend not only sexist, but racist and
classist values," said Dan Born-
stein, a Women's Studies major and
LSA junior.
Men enroll in Women's Studies
classes for the same reason that
women do: to evaluate the role of
women in the world. But they are
challenged to dispell stereotypes and
preconceptions with which they
were raised.
"At first in my discussion, I was
always stumbling over myself not
to say girl' instead of 'woman,' or
anything that might be considered
offensive. It's protocol like that
that you stumble over," said Pete
Giangreco, an LSA junior.
Giangreco is taking "U.S. Women
in History."
Mike Tripp, an LSA junior
majoring in Women's Issues, added,
"You're definitely more conscious
of what you're going to say - you
can easily come under some fire.".
ACCORDING to Alfred
Meyer, a political science professor

e input
who teaches "Women and
Socialism," some female students
are astonished when a male walks
into the classroom. Meyer said that
men may act differently when they
are surrounded by a group of
women discussing women's issues.
"Men tend to be more reticent or
cautious, not because they are
intimidated, but because they don't
want to give off the impression that
they are invading the women's
turf," he said.
Women's Studies teaches that a
"feminist" is anyone who believes
in equality between men and wo-
men. Some male students agree that
the classes have made them more in
tuned with women's concerns.
Tripp said, "I think that I've
become a more aware person - I'm
not sure if my attitudes have chan-
ged, though."
"At first I wasn't sure how
many guys were going to be in the
class. I definitely felt uncom-
fortable," he explained. This appre-
hension may inhibit class dis-
cussion. But some female students
say male input is essential in order
to debate most women's issues.
Wendy Raber, an LSA freshman
taking Women's Issues said, "The
women's position in society is
greatlyinfluenced by the role men
play. Therefore males' opinions
could prove to be very helpful."

SPRING BREAK BEGINS
on February 21
Reservations now being accepted -
for February tanning sessions when purchased
at
TANNING CENTERS j
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Sun 12-5 pm Expires 37-87 No other offers apply Sun 11-5 p.m.
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PARSONS
SCHOOL OF DESIGN
Special Summer Programs
FRANCE
WEST AFRICA

ITALY

T

I1

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Speakers
Karl Fryxell - "An Opsin
Gene that is Expressed in the R7
Photoreceptor Cell of Drosophila,"
Department of Biology, noon,
3011 Natural Science Bldg.
Alec Nove - "Reform. What
Reform?," Center for Russian &
Eastern European Studies, 4:30
p.m., Room 200, Lane Hall.
Greg Girolami - "Low-Valent
OrganometallicDerivatives of the
Early Transition Elements as
Catalytic Models and Ceramic
Predursors," Department of
Chemistry, 4 p.m., Room 1200,
Chemistry Bldg.
Samuel Eldersveld -
"National Bureaucrats and
Politicians: Elites in Conflict and
Consensus at the Apex of the
System," LSA Distinguised Senior
Faculty Lecture Series, 8 p.m.,
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Kent Hubbell - University
Institute for the Humanities, 7:30
p.m., Rackham Auditorium.
Meetings

Safety Walking Service, 8 p.m.-
1:30 a.m., Rm. 102, UGLI (936-
1000).
Continental Insurance
Company Recption - Career
Planning & Placement, 7-9 p.m.,
Kuenzel Room, Union (764-7460).
"Introductory Practice
Interviewing" - Career
Planning & Placement, 4:10-6
p.m., CP&P (764-7460).
"Resumes for the
International Student" -
4:10-5:30 p.m., 221619 Art &
Architecture Bldg.(764-7460).
"Preparing for the Summer
Job Fair" - Career Planning &
Placement , 4:10-5:30 p.m., MLB
Lecture Rm. 1 (764-7460).
"Resume Writng Lecture"-
Career Planning & Placement, 6-
7:30 p.m., B115 MLB (763-5027).
Lockheed Missles & Space
Pre-Interview - SWE, 4-6
p.m., Room 3513 East
Engineering Bldg. (763-5027).
Chevron Pre-Interview -
SWE, 5-7 p.m., Room 1078, East
Engineering Bldg. (763-5027).
Communication Internship
Booklets Sale - Women in
Communications, fishbowl (437-
03 60)
Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The List," c/o
The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor, Mich.,
48109. Include all pertinent in-
formation and a contact phone
number. We must receive an-
nouncements for Friday and
Sunday events at least two weeks
before the event, and announ-
cements for weekday events

Council deb;
(Continued from Page 1)
business owners oppose the dev-
elopment at tonight's public
hearing. Eight of the 11 coun-
cilmembers are required to approve
the proposal for construction to
begin.
Businessmen have expressed
fears that low-income people -
some of whom are now homeless
- may drive away customers, ac-
cording to Councilmember Lowell
Peterson (D-First Ward), who
sponsored the resolution. Peterson
pointed out, however, that the site
will have a 24-hour manager and is
surrounded by few residential
houses.
Calendar
chang
C e
an ers Med.
Students

ates housing
Resistance from neighbors and
high building costs have plagued
city officials in their search for a
single-room occupancy (SRO) dev-
elopment, which dates back nearly
two years.
In April, 1985, the city
council's Affordable Housing Task
Force, chaired by Peterson, released
a 97-page report that identified "a
severe need for more housing
affordable to low and moderate-
income people in Ann Arbor."
In the past two years, Peterson,
Salvation Army officials, and local
developers have examined and
rejected at least 12 possible sites to
build or renovate an SRO facility.
QUALITY TYP11NG
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GREAT BRITAIN
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International programs are offered for students,
teachers and working professionals. Courses
include: archaeology; architectural history; art
history; clay and textile design; decorative arts;
drawing; fashion; graphic design; painting and
photography. Undergraduate and graduate credits
are available to qualified participants. For more
information, please mail the coupon below or
call the Parsons Office of Special Programs:
(212) 741-8975.

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Parsons School of Design, Office of Special Programs
66 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10011
Please send me a brochure on Parsons Special Summer
Programs.
Name
Address
City State Zip

University Lacrosse Team-
6-8 p.m., Colliseum.
Student Struggle for Soviet
Jewry Meeting - 6:30 p.m.,
2231 Angell Hall.
Christian Science
Organization Meeting- 7:15
p.m., Michigan League.
Furthermore

(Continued from Page 1),
been discussed in the committee,
but students were not aware until
recently how this cut would affect
their exam period. Lin said he is
concerned that student input will be
ignored in the future.
The administration and faculty
members supported the change
because it would eliminate conflicts
for graduate students and inteflex
students who take classes in the
medical school and other schools.
The change, in addition to
cutting one week off vacation time
will also shorten the exam periov
by three days. Students argue these
days are important because the
medical school calendar is crammed.
"We just don't feel like that is
enough to merit crowding things
in," Magill said.

I
MEN

J

U-M COUNSELING SERVICES
3100 Michigan Union - 764-8312
Counseling Services will be offering the following groups and workshops for currently enrolled
students. These groups are presently in the process of being filled. Enrollment is limited. Many
groups require screening meetings with Counseling Service's staff to assure best service. For more
information inquire at Counseling Services.

38

GOODBYES...GRADUATING SENIORS
SIGNIFICANT LOSS - WOMEN'S GROUP -
MONDAYS 5:00 p.m.-6:30 p.m. WEDNESDAYS 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m.
Screenings. led by Diana Hunt and Kathy Kimel
led by Susan Kelly MINORITY/INTERNATIONAL
TRANSITION STUDENTS' GROUP -
"LEAVING HOME" GROUP - WEDNESDAYS 3:00 p.m.-4:30 p.m.
MONDAYS 4:00 p.m.-6:00 p.m. Screenin Cr.
Screenhngs. led by Blanca Charriez

ADULT CHILDREN OF
ALCOHOLICS/IMPAIRED
PARENTS - THERAPY GROUP -
None currently open. Inquire at Counseling
Services for future groups
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS -
THURSDAYS 12 p.m.
Non-smoking Chapter: Counseling Services
Smoking Chapter: St. Mary's Education Bldg.

F

i

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