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January 27, 1987 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-01-27

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ARTS
Tuesday, January 27, 1987

The Michigan Daily

Page 5

Dreams So Real comes alive

By Brian Bonet
At first glance, one might assume that
Dreams So Real is simply an R.E.M. clone.
Like R.E.M., Dreams So Real hail from that
infamous rock 'n' roll playground, Athens,
Georgia and interweaves smooth, harmonious
vocals with melodious Rickenbacker guitar
riffs. In addition, Dreams So Real is produced
by none other than R.E.M. guitarist, Peter
Buck.
This is where the similarities between the
two bands end, though. Dreams So Real has a
distinctive style of its own that eludes all
attempted labels, leaving music critics
(astonishingly enough) at a loss for adjectives.
"There's a definite understated momentum
running through the music," explains, vocalist

and guitarist, Barry Marler, who describes the
trio's debut LP, Father's House (on Twin Tone
Records), as "upbeat, powerful stuff. We like
to think we have an individuality that sets us
away from the bulk of American pop."
Prior to the release of Father's House, the
band enjoyed the success of their first single,
"Everywhere Girl," which climbed to tenth on
the College Music Journal's playlist. "We
knew it was good, but we never thought it
would do what it did for us," explains Marler.
In early 1984, Dreams So Real performed at
an Oh-Ok record release party at Athens' 40
Watt Club after only two weeks of rehearsal.
The audience was overwhelmed and called the
band back for two encores. It was then that
Marler knew the band had something special.
"People were reacting vigorously to what we
were doing."
Making people react vigorously to their
music is something Dreams So Real strives

for. "We try to grab'em by the brainstem and
shake'em," said Marler. "We like them to
think, feel, and wake up."
In light of Dreams So Real's current
success and future goals, Marler has not
overlooked the opportunity Athens offers to
aspiring, new bands. "Athens encourages people
to get involved in rock 'n' roll. A lot of people
start immaturely and find out, 'heh, I really can
write songs' or 'heh, I really can play bass."
But Marler doesn't want Dreams So Real to
be known as just another band from Athens.
"A lot of bands get caught up in the Athens
scene," comments Marler. "We're trying to go
beyond that."
Dreams So Real is playing at Rick's
American Cafe tonight. Fellow Twin Tone
recording artists The Figures will open the
show at 9p.m. in support of their new album,
THE GATEWAY.

Books

Daily Photo by LESLIE BOORSTEIN
Ceramics is one of the most popular Artspace classes offered.
Leave space for art

By Pamela Franklin
If you passed through the
Union last Wednesday, you
probably were surprised to see an
almost nude man hanging around
outside the MUG. Don't get the
wrong impression, though.
Wearing only shorts, the man was
modeling for a figure sculptor to
promote Artspace, a 12-year-old
program of classes created for non-
art school students.
"Students who take these
classes are the people who have
thought, gee, I'd really like to
take photography, but I don't
want to take it as a credit course,"
according to Artspace director
Judith Corkan Katch of the
Michigan Guild of Artists and
Artisans.
The art classes are located in
the basement of the Michigan
Union, and include photography,
painting, drawing, printmaking,
jewelry design, and ceramics.
"Photography and ceramics
have been the classes known to
fill up first," warned Katch.
Artspace works in conjunction
with the Michigan Union, the
Union providing the space and the
Guild providing teachers,
equipment, advertisements and
scheduling.
"The Union wants to have
people come in and use their
profit- making facilities, and we
need a place to run our classes,"
Katch explained, "so it's a very
workable situation."
Artspace is an opportunity to
explore artistic ambitions without
the intimidation of an art school.
The classes provide an outlet from
academic pressures, and a useful
learning experience for their
lifetime enjoyment.
"If you have an inkling and
you want to test it, you come
here. If something develops and

you get inspired, you go on to the
art school," said Katch.
Many of the students taking
the classes are in the law and
business schools and in need of a
release from academic pressures.
Many undergrads who have taken
an Artspace course have gone onto
the art school to further their
artistic studies'.
The teachers are geared to teach
beginning and intermediate
students, yet they also take
individual talents and abilities into
account, going beyond the basics
with the students who are capable.
The goal of the classes is for
each student to leave with one or
two projects. Students are given a
key to the studios and encouraged
to work on their art projects when
classes are not in session.
To register, contact the Union
Box office, or mail in the
brochure (available at the Union
information desk) to the Michigan
Guild's office at 118 North Fourth
Avenue, and by calling 662-3382.
Deadline is January 30; classes
begin February 2, and are held on
weekday evenings and weekend
afternoons.

Early Novels
and Stories
By Willa Cather
Edited by Sharon O'Brien
Literary Classics of the United States
$27.50
Willa Cather's lifestyle ranks up
there with Ernest Hemingway's, in
the same kind of macho, confused
way. For example, she cropped her
hair, insisted she was a boy and
called herself William Cather M.D.
from the age of fifteen to nineteen,
making her debut on the literary
scene around the same time as Pa -
pa.
A brilliant, and prolific writer,
Cather suffered throughout her life
from illness and a gradually worsen -
ing hand condition that slowed her
writing considerably in her later
years. Cather turned literary critic
and journalist at the University of
Nebraska, which started her on her
life-long commitment to writing.
As the winner of the Pulitzer Prize
in 1923, Cather had received hon -
orary degrees from Michigan, Yale,
Columbia and Princeton, and was
commemorated with other major
American authors in a postage
stamp series.
"Early Novels and Stories" is a
collection of Cather's best works,
including The Troll Garden, 0
Pioneers!, The Song of the Lark,
One of Ours and My Antonia,

which contains the original
illustrations by W.T. Benda.
The volume is one of a series
from the Library of America, which
includes other American authors
such as Henry Adams, Stephen
Crane, Emerson, Faulkner,
Hawthorne, and many others. The
series gives a great overview of
major American authors and is a
welcome addition to any library.
Although some critics have
called her work sentimental, her
characterization of strong, some -
times unusual, and always human
women render her work, and
certainly this collection, a valuable
addition to any library.
-Rebecca Cox

aAM u .~wu
ATTENTION BSN
CLASS OF 1987.
The Air Force has a special pro-
gram for 1987 BSNs. If selected,
you can enter active duty soon
after graduation-without waiting
for the results of your State Boards.
To qualify, you must have an
overall "B" average. After commis-
sioning, you'll attend a five-month
internship at a major Air Force
medical facility. It's an excellent
way to prepare for the wide range
of experiences you'll have serving
your country as an Air Force nurse
officer. For more information, call
(313) 994 -0522 Collect
aa low
....4
"

A'."
p

What's Happening
Recreational Sports

MEDIATRICS
presents
BREAKER MORANT
Tuesday, January 27
7:30,9:3Opm
Nat. Sci. Auditorium
For more info, call 763-1107

HAVE YOU VISITED
OUR NEW RADRICK FARMS
SKI CENTER AND TRAILS?
Weekend Ski Clinics

Jan.
Feb.
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pm/INT (2 classes)
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Center Hours

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LET'S GET DOWN
To BUSINESS
Look at the leaders in American business and you'll find they all have one thing in com-
mon. They deliver quality to their customers. They demand quality from their vendors.
And that's what they get from Boise Cascade Office Products. We're a leader in the
distribution of office supplies to America's premiere businesses. We're a company made
up of leaders. A company that's made for career growth. And now, we're coming to
campus to talk with you.
Boise Cascade Office Products is looking for graduates who want to make leadership
their career. We will be interviewing on campus in the areas of:
ACCOUNTING & FINANCE
SALES & MARKETING
When we talk, you'll have an opportunity to learn just how far quality can take a business
in today's business climate. And you'll see just how far your career can go in a short
period of time.
With 31 locations throughout the U.S., we can offer you plenty of opportunity. As a rapidly
growing member of the Boise Cascade family, we can offer you even more potential.
America's business office needs you. Let's talk. For details on interviewing and sign-up,
please check with your placement office or write to us this week. Attn: A. Rotfeld, College
Relations. Boise Cascade Office Products, 800 W. Bryn Mawr, Itasca, IL 60143. An Eual

TALLY HALL IS:
A STATE EMPLOYEE'S SMALL
BUSINESS DREAMS COMING TRUE
IN A WORLD OF CHILDREN'S r?
LITRAURE. #~e

A few years ago, Curt Irish - a security trainer at the Forensic Center - had the
chance to go into business. He found a great opportunity with Children's Book Mark-
an area franchise carrying children's literature, toys, educational games, school supplies
and more.
Wanting a location outside a regional mall, Curt delayed his opening until
the completion of Tally Hall. Today, with an expert staff and more than 5000
titles in stock, Children's Book Mark has all the necessary ingredients for success.
Children's Book Mark is more than books. It's the commitment
of a local resident to the community, to children, to literature.
Children's Book Mark and Tally Hall.

i

NO __...._......

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