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January 23, 1987 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1987-01-23

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, January 23, 1987- Page 3

Right to abortion
is commemorated

i

(Continued from Page 1)
States. It was a landmark ruling,
but it was not enough.
Most people know about the
1973 Roe vs. Wade decision in
which the Supreme Court legalized
abortion in the United States. But
the organized struggle over abortion
began a generation ago.
In the 1940s and 50s new
organizations like Planned Par-
enthood gave the abortion
movement support, not only
because it reaffirmed the right of a
woman to control her own body,
but because it was a form of
population control.
INTERNATIONAL birth
control, as defined in a 1962 U.S.
Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare report, included
abortion as a form of contraception.
The National Organization for
Women was formed in 1966.
In the late 60s, the fight for
abortion rights intensified with
other forms of social activism. In
1969, protesters picketed the annual
American Medical Association
meeting and distributed leaflets
"demanding that doctors sign a
petition" to repeal anti-abortion
laws, some over a hundred years
old.
IN THE Roe vs. Wade
decision, Justice Harry Blackman
wrote that the constitutional right
to privacy was "broad enough to
encourage a women's decision
whether or not to terminate her
pregnancy." The court denied that
her rights were absolute.
"We do not agree that she is
entitled to terminate her pregnancy
at whatever time, in whatever way

and for whatever reason she alone
chooses," the court said.
The decision prohibited the right
of the state to interfere in a
woman's right to an abortion in the
first 12 weeks. In the second
trimester of pregnancy, the state
could only interfere in the quality of
maternal health care. In the final
trimester, abortion could also be
performed "to preserve the life or
health of the mother."
THE decision did not declare
that abortion was a woman's right
to choose. "The abortion decision
and its effectuation must be left to
the medical judgment of the
pregnant woman's attending
physician," the decision said.
The Supreme Court has
repeatedly upheld the Roe decision,
while constantly attempting to
redefine its decision. Most in
dispute is the rule requiring doctors
to inform minor's parents prior to
performing an abortion on her.
Also at issue is the responsibility
of the state to fund abortions.
The women spoke of advances,
but also the struggle they foresaw
ahead. "The decision said that those
people who could afford it were
free," said another woman at the
last night's meeting.
THE women talked of violence,
fear, and sadness.AThen, they
planned strategies. A picket this
week, a meeting next week.
Outside, on the fresh snow, the
women formed a circle around a
young tree. Hand-in-hand and eyes
closed, they sang.
"She touches, she changes, and
everything she touches changes."

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RK-'NALD RFA6AN'
YOU
FROMOUP
S1S7§JPJA

I

thi~rdprotest
By MELANIE ULBRICH that they shut their door
About 45 protesters demon- conflict."
strated yesterday outside the Ann Mark Weisbrot, anothe
Arbor Navy Recruiting Center, the protests and a for
third in a series of demonstrations tampaign manager, said
the Latin American Solidarity the protests have
Committee (LASC) has planned. tremendous success."
The first two were held outside Weisbrot said LAS
the National Guard Armory on Governor James Bla
Fifth St. "listen to his constituent
A leaflet distributed by LASC and to "publicly prot
said this week's protest targeted the anto i clynd rot
Navy "because of the long history actions in Honduras and
of Navy/Marine intervention" in Lisa Greyson, an a
Central America. It cited the Navy's Governor's Office, said si
participation "in extensive the Governor had heard
maneuvers off the coast of group's protests, but "it
Nicaragua designed to intimidate the to tell how much any
people and train for any possible protest affects the G
invasion by U. S. troops." position on various'
Navy officials in Lansing could issues."
not comment. Baker said the visibi
The recruiting center, located on was another reason for ta
Huron between Fourth and Fifth Navy Recruiting Cent
Streets, had already locked its doors motorists honked thei
for the day when the protesters while driving past the pr
arrived at 5 p.m.
Former Democratic con- Other protesters wer
gressional candidate Dean Baker, of AAMISTAD, the Sis
one of the protest organizers, said Ann Arbor Task Force
he believed the government was Religious Coalition of
scared of the publicity. He said it America. Weisbrot sai
was "satisfying to go to an happy for such a large
institution that is so afraid of us despite the cold weather.

LASC

stages

s to avoid
er leader in
mer Baker
he believes
been a
SC wants
tnchard to
s out here"
est U. S.
Nicaragua."
ide in the
he believed
J about the
is difficult
particular
3overnor's
political
le location
rgeting the
ter. Many
r support
otesters.
emembers
ter City of
e, and the
n Central
d he was
e showing

Daily Photo by KATHRYN WRIGHT
Ann Arbor resident David Buchen protests U.S. intervention in Central
America yesterday. He joined the Latin American Solidarity Coalition in
its third weekly protest, held this week outside the Navy Recruiting of-
fice.
Caucus Members disclosed

By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
Paul Josephson, chairperson of
the newly formed Student Caucus
on Strategic Planning and former
Michigan Student Assembly
President, asserted yesterday that he
had no intentions of usurping
MSA's power when he appointed
students to the caucus without
assembly input.
"As long as there is no
exclusion of othersstudent groups to
participate in Provost Duderstadt's
strategic planning process, I see
nothing wrong getting a group
together outside the assembly," said
Josephson.
Controversy over the caucus
began when MSA president Kurt
Muenchow resigned from the
caucus, accusing Josephson of

infringing upon MSA's right to
appoint students to University
committees. The assembly also
passed a resolution condemning the
caucus and forbidding MSA
members to participate.
"MS A has to realize that they
are not the only students who can
talk to the administration," said
Josephson.
The caucus met once last term
with Duderstadt,tand has met three
times since the term began. Other
members include Mary Lichliter,
chairperson of the Michigan Union;
Nick Bhatt, head of the University
Activities Center; Morris Kakuda,
president of the Asian American
Association; Peter Samet of the
Residence Halls Association; and
David Wilson, president of the
Engineering Council.

IIII III i qmplq &

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CORRECTIONS
Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. was killed on April 4, 1968. The Daily
incorrectly reported the date of his death in Tuesday's paper.

Call for show times

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FINANCIAL AID APPLICATIONS

2011 STUDENT ACTIVITIES BUILDING
DEADLINE: Friday, January 30, 1987
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College Work-Study. Students who will enroll at least half time may apply for
College Work-Study.
Submit the application form by Friday, January 30, 1987, to insure priority con-
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