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December 08, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-12-08

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, December 8, 1986 - Page 3

Officials comment on Iran deal

By STEVE GREGORY
Last Friday, President Reagan
told a meeting of Republican Con-
gressional leaders he would swear
on the Bible he knew nothing of
the transfer of revenues from the
Iran arms shipments to the Contra
rebels. But as the Iran arms crisis
unfolds, Michigan officials question
Reagan's credibility and remain
unsure of the incident's impli-
cations.
"I would hope he's telling the
truth," U.S. Sen. Donald Riegle
said, after some hesitation.
RIEGLE (D-Mich.) said it
would be a "stunning change in the
situation" if it were discovered that
the President had lied, and he added
that only then should the question
of impeachment arise.
"I think it is important we have
a strong, fully functioning pres-
ident," but Reagan can regain this
status only when everything is
known about the affair, he said.
Riegle believes Lt. Col. Oliver
North and former National Security
Advisor John Poindexter were not
the only officials who knew of the
diversion of about $30 million to
the Contras. "It was far more
widely known than by just the two
of them," he said.
"They both understand the chain
of command and how it works"
because of their military training,
Riegle said, explaining why neither
man would have acted alone.
RIEGLE SAID that because
gaining support for the Contras has
been one of Reagan's foremost

foreign policy concerns, "I would
think those involved would have
made sure the president was fully
informed of any developments
concerning the Contras."
Michel Oksenberg, a University
political science professor and a
member of the National Security
Council from 1977 to 1980, said,
"Ord the basis of what is publicly
known, it is hard to come to the
conclusion (North and Poindexter)
worked alone."
"In the Carter Administration, it
would have been impossible," he
said.
OKSENBERG SAID it was
too early to assess the political
ramifications the crisis may have
on Reagan's last two years in
office. But he said that if planned
investigations reveal nothing more
about the affair, Reagan could still
pursue an effective foreign policy
before his term ends. He cited arms
control negotiations as one area in
which Reagan could make headway.
Gauging any ramifications of the
crisis will be difficult in light of
next year's democratic take-over of
Congress. Oksenberg predicted that
partisan politics may hinder
Reagan's effectiveness more than
repercussions stemming from the
scandal.
Oksenberg said he thinks Demo -
crats will concur that "We don't
benefit when our president is
weakened."
Philip Shandeler, a press
secretary for U.S. Sen. Carl Levin,
(D-Mich.) declined to speculate on

Levin's views of possible effects of
the crisis. "Only the future can
tell," he said.
Shandeler said Reagan's staff
reorganization will largely deter-
mine if he regains falling public
support. Recent polls show Rea-
gan's approval rating has dropped
21 percentage points from a repor-
ted 69 percent last September.
Shandeler said Levin wants the
foreign policy decision-making
process reformed.

Levin favors re-establishing Sec-
retary of State Charles Schultz as
"lead player" in directing foreign
policy, Shandeler said.

UM News in
The Daily
764-0552

Announcing the authorized biography
of the world's favorite clayboy
-written in harmony with
Gumby'5 dad, Art Clokey

U
U
U
U
U

The star of one of the most innovative TV shows of all time,
the little green boy with the bump on his head now stars in
his own book. It features:
130 great photos in color and black-and-white
a look at every Gumby episode
an exclusive interview with Art Clokey
a selection of Gumby's fan mail
step-by-step instructions on how to
film your own Gumby adven-
ture using the techniques.;
of trimensional
animation

Santa's protege Daily Photo by DARRIAN SMITH
Four-year old Jeremy perches on the shoulders of Jim McDonald, a
University student, at a Christmas party in Tally Hall yesterday. The
party, held for underprivileged children in the area, was sponsored by
Kappa Alpha Theta Sorority and Sigma Kappa and Phi Gamma Delta
fraternities.

I3

Profs. design
By STEVE KNOPPER
' A group of University professors is
'developing robots which would monitor and
maintain nuclear reactor containment buildings.
According to Nuclear Engineering Prof.
David Wehe, director of the project, these
robots will save billions of dollars in plant
'maintenance costs and significantly increase
safety inside the reactors.
Wehe said it will take 10 years to develop a
"good, autonomous robot" to perform tasks
inside a*-reactor. He expects the group's first
prototype to be completed by 1991.
THE ROBOTS would eliminate the need
to shut down plants for repairs. Wehe said
shutting down a U.S. nuclear plant for one day
'of maintenance costs between $500,000 and $1
million.
Currently, plants shut down for a full day for
,eneral maintenance or leaks. "The robot can
meander over, take a peek, and the plant won't

robots for a
have to shut down," said Wehe, adding that the
Three Mile Island accident in Pennsylvania in
1979 may not have occurred had such robots
existed.
Department of Nuclear Engineering Chair-
man Glenn Knoll, a member of the group, said
that in a nuclear plant there is a "strong
incentive to replace people by machines," for
safety reasons.
NUCLEAR ENGINEERING Prof. John
Lee emphasized, however, that the robots will
not be designed to actually replace human
workers, but to reduce the dangers faced by
humans in the plants. "It will be a long time
before we can make a robot that will be able to
perform all functions of a human," Lee said.
According to Wehe, the robots will "look
over valves, gauges and othe=maintenance
work" and perform "minor work, the kind of
work a human could do with a screwdriver and a

wi

clear plants
intelligence as possible for a piece of software,"
said Wehe. They will utilize "semi-autonomous
operations," he said. "We tell it what to do and
it does it."
Wehe said the planned robot will be able to
detect gamma rays and optical rays, making
them more efficient than humans. Steam
buildup in nuclear plants restricts human
vision, and humans can't detect gamma rays.
Knoll said such a development will be a "real
first."

The Authorized Biography
of the World's Favorite Clayboy
by LOUIS KAPLAN1 and SCOTT MICAL5WN
in harmony with AR~T CLOKEY
Size 7" x 10". Paperback, $12.95, now at your
bookstore, or send check or money order to
Crown Publishers, Inc., 225 Park Ave. South,
N.Y.,cr.Y.10. Please add $1.00 postage and
handling. N Y. and N J. residents, add sales tax.
p;IARMOflY BOOKS
o A division of Crown Publishers, Inc.

ii

THE ROBOT, Knoll said, will be
equipped with artificial intelligence; it will be
able to make decisions based on information
from cameras, radiation censors, and other
sources.
The U.S. Department of Energy is funding
the project, according to Knoll. Wehe said the
total cost of the project will run from $100,000
to $150,000, but added that he expects the
benefits to be 10 times greater than the cost.

wrench."
The planned robots

will "have as much

Faculty senate may criticize code draft
(Continued from Page 1)

expulsion to govern behavior out of
the classroom.
"The University should not
attempt to bypass the present
judicial system, but instead should
use their resources toward improv-
ing it," Ringsmuth said.
Ringsmuth and other board
-members stress that their comments
do not just criticize the University
'Council's progress, but also offer
constructive alternatives. The
creation of a liaison between the
University and the present judicial
system is an alternative that the
board intends to investigate more
thoroughly.
ALTHOUGH the critique was
not intended to attack the progress

of the University Council, Internal
Medicine Prof. Donald Rucknagel,
chairperson of the council, said it is
"divisive and counter-productive."
"By suggesting that we throw
out the idea for an additional
judicial system, they are in essence
instructing the University Council
what to do - something I'm not
going to stand for," Rucknagel said.
Rucknagel has served as chairperson
for two years, and is scheduled to
leave the University in February to
head a medical clinic in Atlanta.
"It's frustrating to realize that
the democratic way of writing a
code may not work," he added.
Rucknagel warns that if MSA and

1

the faculty come out too adamantly
against any code, University
President Harold Shapiro may
choose to bypass bylaw 7.02 and
write his own code.
But students and faculty
members opposed to the code are
encouraged by the board's oppo-
sition to the emergency procedures
and any previous drafts of the code.
"It's important to see that faculty
members are concerned about due
process, and that they see how a
system within the University would
abridge the rights of students," said
Ken Weine, a past member of the
University Council and a member
Student
senate may
gnive office
to paperU
(Continued from Page 1)
said.
Despite the office crunch, Ek-
lund believes the Law School
Student Senate will be able to find
room for the newspaper.
Last Monday the student senate
was unable to assign new space to
the paper because there weren't
enough senators to make a quorum.
Hunter said he is confident that the
senate will assign them working
space.
Senate Secretary Jeff Winick
finds it dubious that the admin-
istration informed the senate of the
mv, f can atP, in thetrm "Th-

of MSA's Student Right's Com-
mittee.
SACUA is not scheduled to
discuss the board's critique until
January at the earliest. Stebbins
said that an endorsement of the
board's critique would be the first
position on the code that the faculty
senate has ever taken.
Since its release of the
emergency procedures, the Univer-
sity Council has tackled political
dissent, the most controversial area
of the code. Although Rucknagel
'has intended to have a final
document finished before the term,
students and faculty members are
still arguing about the need for a
code.
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I ,

Campus Cinema
Desperately Seeking Susan
(Susan Seidelman, 1984), MTF,
7:45 p.m., Mich.
So-soscrewball comedy in which
dissatisfied housewife Rosanna
Arquette gets amnesia and has a
wacky adventure in the big city,
while Madonna smokes a joint in a
bathtub. Also starring Kurt Serbus
look-alike Aidan Quinn.
Speakers
John Erving - "Chemical
Opportunities in Space,"
Macromolecular Research Center, 4
p.m., Chemistry Bldg., Room1300.
Wakgari Hirpo - "Alkane C-H
Activation," Department of
Chemistry, 4 p.m., Chemistry
Bldg., Room 1200.
Khenpo Karthar Rinpoche -
"Death-Dying: a Buddhist View,"
C'Qn.r fr '.gnihk. S eater

Meetings

University Christian
Organization - 7:15,
League.

Science
Michigan

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For more information, call 662-9131.
Bring this ad with you to The Ecology Box for a
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Furthermore
SAFEWALK - Nighttime Safety
Walking Service, 8 p.m.-1:30 a.m.,
UGLI, Room 102 (936-1000).
Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The
List," c/o The Michigan
Daily, 420 Maynard St.,
Ann Arbor, Mich.r48109.
Include all pertinent infor-
mation and a contact phone
number. We must receive
notice of Friday, Saturday,
and Sunday events (for
Weekend Magazine) at least
two weeks before publica-
tion; notice of weekday

HAPPY HOLIDAYS!
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For Next Semester
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