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September 05, 1986 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 14 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 5, 1986

.4

Women in
march
sponsor
rallies
(Continued from Page 3)
said she was surprised when, two
days later, two security workers
who detained her joined the
march and said, "Some of us
really want to be with you."
WINKELMAN said the march
has been gaining national
support and new marchers since it
left Denver. Pauline Ahern and
her ten-year-old daughter
Amelia, came from Australia to
join the march in Denver and
will continue until the march's
conclusion. Ahern left her job as
a nurse because she has been
involved in peace activism for a
long time and believed the march
was a "creative way of getting the
message across."
With just two months until the
conclusion of the march,
participants must soon decide
what they will do in the future.
Cooney said there has been talk
about going to Europe and
marching to Moscow or opening a
lobbying center in Washington,
D.C. Ahern wants to go to
England and visit Greenham
Common, a military base that has
been the site of numerous
antinuclear protests, before
returning to Australia.
But Winkelman has not yet
thought of life beyond the march.
"It's hard to think of leaving the
march community," she said.
"I'll be working for peace no
matter what I'm doing."

Technology to avoid
air collisions lags

WASHINGTON (AP) The
technology that would warn pilots
of an impeding aerial collision is
known, but efforts to install the
devices into commercial jets have
been marked by years of
contention and, critics say,
government foot dragging.
The collision of an Aeramexico
DC-9 and a single-engine private
plane over a Los Angeles suburb
this week has directed renewed
attention to the need for
sophisticated airborne collision
avoidance systems for the
industry's fleet of 3,000
commercial jetliners.
BUT IT may well be another
two years before the Federal
Aviation Administration of -
ficials acknowledge that the
technical problems have been
solved after some 20 years of
research and development.
The so-called "T-CAS," or
traffic alert and collision
avoidance system, which is
installed in the cockpit, uses
radar and computers to track
nearby aircraft and provide both a
visual and verbal warning to the
pilot of any plane that might pose
a threat. It also provides
suggested evasive maneuvers as
the intruder plane gets closer.
Small aircraft would not need
the sophisticated T-CAS, which-
has been estimated to cost as much
as $100,000, as long as they have a
tranponder that has altitude
reporting capability. About half
of the 220,000 small private planes
now have such transporters,
although the single-engine Piper
aircraft involve in this week's
California collision apparently
did not.
FAA ADMINISTRATOR
Donald Engen acknowledges the
collision avoidance technology
has proven to be effective, but he
says it still needs to be tested in the
real-world environment testing
that is not expected to be concluded
until 1988.
A prototype T-CAS system has
been installed in a Piedmont's

Airlines Boeing 727 and will be
in use on passenger-carrying
flights before the end of the year,
the agency said. Those flights
were to have started early this
year, but were pushed back
because of questions about pilot
training, aviation sources said.
Next year United Airlines and
Northwest Airlines also will test
a small number of T-CAS pro-
totypes in a year-long program.
THE AVERAGE air traveler
may be surprised that something
as basic as an alarm to warn
pilots of a nearby aircraft has not
long been part of every
commercial aircraft's hardware.
But its development has been
lengthy and difficult.
Aviation officials first began
talking about such a device in the
1950's after the collision of two
jetliners over the Grand Canyon.
The actual research and
development of the T-CAS system
and its various predecessors goes
back more than 20 years.'
ENGEN SAYS the FAA is
moving as fast as possible to.
certify the devices, variations of
which have been developed by two
separate companies, and that he is
committed to the sophisticated
radar and computer technology
that could prevent many aerial
collisions.
But critics have said that the
FAA has not been forceful enough.,
over the years to push the
technology and at times has been
too quick to move toward a more
sophisticated device at the expense
of making available to airless a
simpler technology ready to go.
Five years ago, says Repack.
Dan Glibness, D, he was assured
that the technological bugs had
been solved in the collision
avoidance systems and that the
devices would be in commercial
jetliners within a few years.
"NOTHING has happened.,,
Frankly it hasn'thbecause some
folks in the aviation industry
doesn't want to deal with the cost
of it,": said Glickman in an
interview.

Associated Press
Campaigning
Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, daughter of Robert Kennedy, seeks support for her congressional campaign
outside headquarters near Baltimore. She is trying to become the first female in the Kennedy elected to public
office.
- w awwa. a ra-- -- --

I
I

THE OFFICE OF MAJOR EVENTS PRESENTS
JIMMY CLI FF
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 18
POWER CENTER, 8 P.M
Tickets at Michigan Union Ticket Office
and all Ticket World Outlets.
CHARGE-BY-PHONE -763-TKTS

A moment to focus the wprk we are doing
this academic year on caring
for humanity and the world
CANON IN D MAJOR
By Johann Pachelbel
will be peformed live outdoors
on the steps of the Grad Library on
WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 10,
12 NOON, ON THE DIAG
by the Galliard Brass Ensemble
(in case of rain, under the portico behind the Grad Library)

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