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November 19, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-11-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, November 19, 1986 - Page 3
Expert optimistic on Hong Kong

By LESLIE ERINGAARD
The former U.S. Consul General
to Hong Kong said yesterday that
the 1984 British-Chinese agreement
on Hong Kong is a symbolic
reunification of East and West that
will succeed as long as China
continues to encourage economic
growth.
Speaking to a crowd of about 30
in Lane Hall, Burt Levin, the U.S.
Ambassador-Designate to Rangoon,
spoke of the agreements which will
give the Chinese sovereignty over
Hong Kong in 1997 as long as it
remains capitalist and is governed
by the people of Hong Kong.
THERE are still underlying
uncertainties, he added - namely,
the ups and downs of politics.
"What happens after the death of
(Chinese leader) Deng Xiaoping?"
he asked. Overall, however, Levin
said he is "optimistic that the goal
of economic development
i overall...will take priority over
everything else" and safeguard the
new system. The Chinese were
scarred by the Cultural Revolution,
he added, and they won't forget it.
"Even during the height of the
Cultural Revolution, the most
radical phase of Chinese history,
the Chinese left Hong Kong
untouched," Levin said. "Despite
the humiliation of having lost their
territories, the Chinese could have
snapped them up any time during

the past 30 years."
LEVIN stressed that there was
no way the British could have
defended Hong Kong militarily, and
added that Hong Kong is valuable
to the Chinese economically and for
contact and exchange with other
countries - even more so now
because China is becoming more
interested in economic
development.
Because of the coming
expiration date of the lease for the
New Territories, the British had
pressed for negotiations for years to
protect their growing investments
in parts of China.
In October 1982, British Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher traveled
to the People's Republic of China
to begin negotiations under the
assumption that the former treaties
were valid, but the Chinese
government felt that the treaties
were invalid because they were
forced on the Chinese people.
NEGOTIATIONS quickly
reached a stalemate. The tension
between the countries and a
growing recession in the United
States prompted an mini-economic
crisis in Hong Kong, and many
Chinese expressed doubts about the
future of Hong Kong.
In 1983, the British and Chinese
governments resumed negotiations,
and in July of that year the
stalemate began to break. In July,

Thatcher sent the Chinese
Government a letter which stated
that the British would give up
sovereignty over the island if they
could continue to administer it.
Two months later, the Hong
Kong dollar dropped tremendously,
and the people of Hong Kong
panicked. Britain restated that it
would be willing to continue
administration of Hong Kong, and
the Chinese government assented.
IN ADDITION to the new
agreement, the British authorities
wanted to institute a system of
checks and balances in Hong Kong.
This political reform was looked on
with suspicion by power circles in
Hong Kong as they feared that the

British would be able to pick who
they wanted in office and make sure
that person was elected.
Levin said that "fat-cat"
capitalists - who wanted
"untrammeled free enterprise" -
and Chinese Communists united in
opposition to the proposed political
reforms. The reforms were discussed
and negotiated in smoke-filled
rooms for years.
"Now things are okay," said
Levin. The population of Hong
Kong was receptive to the British
propositions, he said, because
average workers saw that they are
better off now than they were 10
years ago.

I

Associated Press

Peace?
Police attempt to move members of the "Peace March" Monday mor-
ning. Some members were arrested attempting to lock the entrance to the
Energy Department in Washington.

tl
Official
By WENDY SHARP
Tom Butts, the University's
Washington lobbyist, told the
lMichigan Student Assembly last
night that it can be an effective
lobbying organization to improve
financial aid.
"There are things going on. They
are going to affect you, and there are
things you can do about it," Butts
said.
The proposed 1988 federal budget
0will be discussed in January, and
Congress likes to hear a student
perspective, he said.
BUTTS NAMED two issues
doming up in which should have
student input: tuition benefits for
teaching assistants, which will expire
in one year, and a new provision

urges MS
requiring students to pay taxes on
grants that aren't applied to their
tuition.
"When something is out of line,
say something about it. Let it be
heard 500 miles away," Butts said.
"Students do make an impression."
John Gaber, vice chair of MS A's
External Relations Committee, said
this year's assembly is "organizing
and planning our strategy for
January." Gaber said MSA may
announce its lobbying plans in a
joint press release with the
University administration and the
Michigan Collegiate Coalition, the
state student government
organization.
MSA members hope to testify at
the state and federal level about their

4 to lobby in P.C.

personal experiences with financial
aid, he said.
In other business, MSA passed a
resolution demanding that the city
require the Housing Inspection
Bureau to enforce the city's housing
code.
"THE CITY housing code is
necessary to protect the health,
safety, and welfare of tenants, as well
as the preserve the Ann Arbor City
housing stock," the resolution said.
The housing bureau has been
ineffective in enforcing the housing
code, especially in student areas,
according to the resolution.
MSA will present this resolution
at the Ann Arbor City Council
meeting on Monday.
The assembly also passed a

resolution condemning a statement
made by U.S. Undersecretary of
Defense Donald Hicks. Hicks was
quoted in Science magazine a few
months ago as saying that the
Reagan administration does not have
to fund professors who oppose
Strategic Defense Initiative research.
The assembly demanded Hicks'
resignation and urged the Reagan
Administration to "cease this policy
of academic harassment and
censorship." The resolution is
relevant because because it affects the
University community, said MSA
representative Rebecca Felton.

THERE'S STILL TIME TO PREPARE
CLASSES STARTING
. .NOVEMBER & JANUARY
203 E. Hoover 662-3149
CALL DAYS,.EVENINGS &WEEKENDS
3 Qeq MPMN
EDlUCATIONhAL CRUM~ LTD.
TESTPREPARATION SPECtAUS SSINCE 1938
Special Student /Youth Fares to
EUROPE
from New York on Scheduled Airlines!
DESTINATIONS OW RT
LONDON $189 $375
PARIS 198 376
FRANKFURT 210 400
ROME 223 426
MILAN 210 400
ZURICH/GENEVA 210 400
VIENNA/BUDAPEST 210 400
Fares to Athens, Tel Aviv, Prague, Warsaw
also available. Add on fares from Boston,
Washington, DC, Chicago, Florida.
For Reservations and Information Call:
WHOLE WORLD TRAVEL
Serving the Student/Youth Market for more than 16 years!
17 E. 45th St., New York, NY 10017
(212) 986-9470
ARE YOU A WRITER
INTERESTED IN
TEACHING WRITING?
2 The English Composition Board
announces a new course:
x "SEMINAR IN PEER TUTORING"
ECB 300
Winter 1987
MW1:30-3:00
The seminar explores theories of writing
and critical thinking, preparing students
to serve in a new Peer Tutoring program as
writing consultants to students in Upper-
level writing courses throughout
the curriculum.
Interested Juniors should contact
Dr. Phyllis Lassner, ECB
1025 Angell Hall 747-4531
HEALTH & FITNESS

"It's not going to
resign, but it's a
lobbying," she said.

get him
method

to
of

11

I

i

I

HMOs experience
business increase

Campus

Cinema

The Bitter Tears Of Petra Von;
Kant (Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1972),l
C2, DBL/7:00 p.m., Nat Sci.;
A story of three lesbians - a fashion]
designer, her sex slave, and a model.]
German with subtitles.]
Beware Of The Holy Whorer
(Rainer Werner Fassbinder, 1970), C2,
DBL/9:15 p.m., Nat Sci.;
A movie crew on location start to really]
get on each others' nerves in one ofI
Fassbinder's most autobiographical1
works.]
The Sure Thing (Rob Reiner, 1985),r
MTF, 7:00 p.m., Mich.l
A wise-cracking slob and an prep girl end
up hoofing it to California together
during spring break in this above-
average, genuinely funny teen romance.
Do you think they'll fall in love?
Medium Cool (Haskell Wexler,
1969), AAFC, DBL/7:00 p.m., MLB 3.
A news cameraman gets increasingly]
apathetic as things get increasingly out]
of hand while he covers the '68
Democratic Convention in Chicago. A
highly acclaimed comment on life in the
Sixties.
Monterey Pop (D. A. Pennebaker,
1968), AAFC, DBL/9:00 p.m., MLB 3.
They're all here- Janis Joplin and Big
Brother, Jimi Hendrix, Otis Redding,
Country Joe And The Fish, Jefferson
Airplane, the Animals, the Who, Canned
Heat, Simon and Garfunkle, Ravi.
Shankar- in the concert film that;
peceededWoodstock.'
Performances
The Swing - Hill Street Players, 8
,p.m., Hillel Auditorium, 1429 Hill
Street.
Speakers
Colin Clipson - "Participative
Design of Workplaces," Inst. of Labor &
Industrial Relations, 12:15 p.m., 6050
Inst. for Social Research.

Dept. of Biology, 4 p.m., Aud. 2 MLB.
Carl Cohen - "Brain Death," noon,
South Lecture Hall, Med. Sci. II.
Michael Silber - "Acculturation and
Social Integration of Jews in Pre-1848
Hungary," Colloquium in Jewish
History & Literature, 4 p.m., 3050
Frieze Bldg.
Michael Agursky - "The
Geopolitical Background of the Bol -
shevik Revolution," Cntr. for Russian &
Eastern European Studies, noon, Com -
mons Rm., Lane Hall.
Michael Agursky - "Current
Domestic and Foreign Policy Issues in
the USSR," Cntr. for Russian & Eastern
European Studies, 4 p.m., Commons
Rm., Lane Hall.
Meetings
Aix-En-Provence, France - Inf -
ormational meeting, Cntr. for Western
European Studies, 7 p.m., 2412 Mason
Hall.
Furthermore
Career Pathways in the
Biological Sciences - Dept. of
Biology, 4-6 p.m., Aud. 4 MLB.
Careers in Health Physics,
Radiological Hygiene, & Rad -
iation Protection - Sch. of Public
Health, 4:30 p.m., Career Planning &
Placement.
Safewalk - Nightime safety walking
service, 8 p.m. - 1:30 a.m., Rm. 102
UGLi.
Being Men - "How Men Treat Each
Other," 7 p.m., Pond Rm., Michigan
Union.
Discrimination Issues- Racism-
7:30 p.m., 126 East Quad.
Electoral Politics & Grass Roots
Organizing - Forum, 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union.
Chinese Lion Dance Troupe -
7:30 p.m., Stockwell, Blue Lounge.

DETROIT (AP)-Business is
booming at the state's 22 health
maintenance organizations (HMO),
whose 1.3 million members are
triple the number of four years ago,
and officials predicted yesterday the
rapid growth would continue.
Behind the boom, they said, is
the rapid rise in health care costs,
which has sent employers and the
general public scrambling for
alternatives to traditional health.
insurance.
"HMOs stress cost containment,
and we're in an era of cost
containment," said Eugene Farnum,
executive director of the Michigan
Association of HMOs.
THE STATE'S HMOs,
which now cover 14 to 15 percent
of all those with health insurance,
will cover 20 percent by 1990,
Farnum predicted.
"We believe managed health care
systems will continue to grow and
may approach 50 percent," said Dr.
David Siegel, medical director of
the Detroit-based Health Alliance

Plan, the state's oldest and largest
HMO.
HMOs, unlike traditional health
insurance plans, provide medical
care directly through clinics,
hospitals, and individual
H ealith
Fitness
physicians. The providers are paid a
fixed amount per patient, rather
than for each service they render.
Because they remove the
financial incentive to treat patients
more than necessary, HMOs have
significantly lower rates of
hospitalization than traditional
insurers.
In the past 10 years, HMO
enrollment in Michigan has

increased more

than 800 percent.

'Balloon' technique

may help
DALLAS (AP)-Tiny balloons
have been used for the first time to
open dangerously narrowed heart
valves in a procedure that costs one-
third as much as surgery and could,
help an estimated 50,000
Americans annually, doctors said
Monday.
The procedure, which was first
tried only last year and has already
spread to at least 15 medical centers
in the United States, has proven
effective in patients who were too
old or too sick to undergo valve-

thousands
Grossman warned, however, that.
the procedure is still experimental.
"There have been deaths and
there will be more," he said.
In the procedure, a wire is
inserted into a vein in the leg and is
threaded into the heart, under the
guidance of X-ray images of the
blood vessels. A balloon is then
threaded along the wire until it is.
inside the narrowed valve and
inflated with fluid.

- -
STUDENT NAUTILUS
CLUB RATES -
PAYMENT PLANS
AVAILABLE.
Unlimited Use Of:
" Nautilus* Pools
" Free Weights
* Racquetball * Gym
3 blocks from central campus
ANN ARBOR "Y"
350 S. FIFTH AVE " 663-0536

Reflections on Beauty
Achieving Beauty Through Education

JW

" Special image and
Health programs
available for your
group or organization.
" Xia Fashion collec-
tions for active and
professional women.
" Evening presentation
available for sororities
and other groups
interested.
. color analysis.
" therapeutic European
facials and skin
care clinic.
" wardrobe building.

Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The
List," c/o The Michigan

Sandi Mackrill, Image Consultant
Kerrytown 2nd Floor " Ann Arbor
(313) 994-0448 " (313) 994-4424

,I

. .--- - .i~irii ii i n~im -

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