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September 04, 1986 - Image 73

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-04
Note:
This is a tabloid page

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U U 'V U U U U U

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NN fRBOR CIvic
ATf f T f
Proudly Announces
its 1986-87 Season
ANGELS FALL by Lanford Wilson
Sept. 10-13, 1986 + LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
GYPSY by Arthur Laurents " Starring Judy Dow
Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim " Music by Jule Styne.
Nov. 12-15, 1986 " THE MICHIGAN THEATER
THE MISANTHROPE by Moliere
Dec. 17-20, 1986 * LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
HEDDA GABLER by Henrik Ibsen
Feb. 25-28, 1987 * LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
THE WIZ by Wm. F. Brown
from Stories of L. Frank Baum
Music and Lyrics by Charlie Smalls
May 13-16, 19870" THE POWER CENTER
Special Benefit Perforance, May 12
ROMANTIC COMEDY
by Bernard Slade
June 17-20, 1987'+ LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

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A LRIGHT all you ice cream
fans, welcome to Ann Arbor-the
haven of all your wildest indulgent
dreams. If you're looking for a
favorite hang-out to fulfill those
cravings of chocolate sundaes and
cookeo mix-ins, you'll have plenty to
choose from.
Just take a stroll down South
University or State St. and inevitably
you'll run into an ice cream oasis
calling your name. Each place has a
different atmosphere welcoming
connoisseurs, ranging from the
traditional soda fountain addicts to
the more modern day mix-in fanatics.
With an entire year ahead, there
should be time to grab your friends
and try out all the ice cream shops
until you find your favorite.
Baskin Robbins: Although lacking
the comfortable atmosphere of the
Beacon Street Creamery or the
creativity of Steve's Ice Cream,
Baskin Robbins makes up for this
with a consistent and delicious
variety of ice cream, floats, and
shakes. Conveniently located on the
corner of South and East University,
next to Ulrich's bookstore, Baskin
Robbins and its 31-derful flavors has
remained a favorite of U students.
(1101 South University).
Beacon Street Creamery: In an ice-
cream-rich market, Ann Arbor's ice-
cream parlors resort to special at-
tractions. Some offer mix-ins, others
31 flavors. The Beacon Street
Creamery is known for its huge waf-
fle-cones, to hold daily-made 16
flavors. (South University and Chur-
ch).
Jasons: Frozen yogurt and tofutti

fortable inside and outside dining
area provide a great place to enjoy
and watch the different people that
this eatery presents. (330 S. Main).
Mrs. Peabody's: Mrs. Peabody's
cookies are sure to go straight to your
heart (if not your thighs). The delec-
table edibles come in seven varieties:
conventional chocolate chip, white
chocolate chunk, fudgy chocolate,
fudgy chocolate with white chocolate
chunks, chocolate chip with nuts,
coconut macadamian, and oatmeal
raising. Yum. The cookies are fresh-
baked several times a day and are the
perfect little pick-me-up while on
route to class in the nearby Modern
Languages Building. Starting this fall
they will be making their own ice
cream. (715 N. University).
Steve's Ice Cream: Undoubtedly
the collegiate hang-out. Once gain, it
was voted the Best of Ann Arbor in the
Michigan Daily. Mix-ins are the at-
traction here along with homemade
ice cream that changes flavors daily.
A customer can choose from a variety
of mix-ins such as nuts, M&M's, or
crushed Heath Bars. They give you a
generous portion for the high price
you pay. (State and William).
Stroh's: Stroh's is conveniently
located in the basement of the Union.
It offers a baked potatoe bar as well
as ice cream, and is a good stop
while standing in line at
the ticket office or waiting
for a bus. The scoops are regular
sized and reasonably priced.
Compiled by Anne Evans and
various staffers of the Entertain-
ment supplememt.

are the suggested forte's at Jason's.
This shoppe offers soups and san-
dwiches in addition to ice cream
which makes it great for quick
social lunches. Everything is a little
expensive, but the quaint atmosphere
with fine service makes eating en-
joyable. (215S. State).
Lovin' Spoonful: Located on Main
Street, this ice cream eatery can be
an escape from the crowds at Steves',
but don't count on it. Lovin' Spoonfuls
offers the largest variety of
homemade ice cream flavors in town.
Lovin' Spoonfuls offers the best of
everything: waffle cones, mix-ins, ice
cream pies, and friendly serive. It
may be a bit of a walk from campus,
but its' worth it. After getting your
favorite flavor of ice cream, a com-

1986-1987 SEASON
87 TICKET ORDER FORM
Ticket information 662-7282
Seating Preference D Orchestra []Balcony
Same seats as last year guaranteed if you order before July 15
Please make checks payable to: Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
O Please charge to my Mastercard/Visa
Card No. Expiration Date_
Signature
Send To:
AACT Tickets " 338 S. Main " Ann Arbor, MI 48104
Name
Address

A

By Rebecca Chung
Tpo ALL of those closet
. classical music lovers who have
been practicing scales religiously in-
stead of watching t.v.; to those who
have driven to far-off lands at ungodly.
hours to commune with other conver-
ts in youth symphonies and camps; to
those who used to tell peers that they
spent last Saturday night at a party
instead of at the all-Shostakovitch
program at the local concert hall; and
to those who, heaven forbid, actually
like the way opera singers sound -
you can relax now. Really. Even
though most of your peers at college
will still blast Pink Floyd and
Depeche Mode on the weekends, you
are now free to retaliate with
Beethoven and Mahler without fear of
censure (except during quiet hours).
It is true that there is security in
numbers, and one classical music
lover living on a hallway full of the
uninitiated can be a little in-
timidating. However, this rarely hap-
pens, not only because there are more
of you than you think there are, but
because there are many who ignored
the secret feelings of joy they felt
during Eine Kleine Nachtmusick and
the opening of Beethoven's Sixth.
These people will knock timidly on
your door and ask, "What is that?"
Feel-proud, for you will have assumed
the rank of priest, guardian of
profound truths.
Nevertheless, classical music is
ultimately a group activity, whether it
be masses of people convening to
listen to a great artist or groups of
people getting together trying to
imitate the great artists. But no mat-
ter which category (and subset) you
fall into, the University has an outlet
for you.
For those who wish to continue per-
forming and/or studying, the first
place to look is the School of Music.
They offer private lessons taught by
graduate students; or if you were the
type who simply had to pass up a
music career for biochemisty and to
write the great American novel as
well, the faculty itself.
In addition, all instrumentalists
and vocalists are eligible to audition
for the School of Music's performing
groups (one year a non-music-major
trumpet player managed to get first
chair in the to band.) LSA students
can do either or both of these things
for credit. But be sure to call the
School of Music as soon as classes
start, because space is limited and
competition is tough, particularly for
lessons.
For people going outside the School
of Music, or for those who can't make
twice-weekly rehearsals, most
graduate students do teach privately
as well (again, get names and num-
bers from the University), and there
are many other groups to get involved
in. Two of the least demanding are the
Campus Orchestra and Campus
Band, although the caliber of
musicians is surprisingly high. These
groups also give credit to LSA studen-
ts.
For vocalists, in addition to the all

student choirs, there is the Choral
Union (made up of students, faculty,
and residents; they perform Han-
del's Messiah every Christmas in ad-
dition to several major choral works
throughout the year), the Men's Glee
Club (home of the beloved Friars) and
the Women's Glee Club, as well as
musicals and operettas (watch kiosks
for mass meeting signs). Of special
interest to instrumentalists - most
student-produced musicals and
operettas will pay you for playing in
the pit. Who says you can't make
money as a musician?
There are also many opportunities
to perform in the Ann Arbor com-
munity as well. Check with local
churches if you want to volunteer your
services during their services, and to
get on lists for weddings and other
events. One of the best-kept secrets in
the area is the First Presbyterian
Church's handbell choir (no experien-
ce necessary and lots of fun!). Call for
details. Another outlet is the Ann Ar-
bor Symphony. While quasi-
professional (i.e. paid), and mostly
comprised of city residents, it is still
worth a try.
For concert-goers, Ann Arbor
usually has a performance going on
somewhere every evening. Call the
University Musical Society (Burton
Tower) and the School of Music for
concert schedules. UMS brings
several major artists and performing
groups to Ann Arbor every year; last
year's season included Yo Yo Ma,
Jessye Norman, the Concertgebouw
Orchestra, Pinchas Zukerman,
guitarist Andres Segovia and The
English Concert. This year Kiri Te
Kanawa, James Galway, and
Maurice Andre are only some of the
luminaries that will grace Hill.
The School of Music features truly
fine performances by its students and
faculty. You are more likey to hear
little-played or recent works here
than in strictly commercial enter-
prises. Other area concert sponsors
include the Ann Arbor Symphony
(who brought Dr. Peter Schickele,
P.D.Q. Bach "specialist", to the
Michigan Theatre last year), and Ars
Musics (which focuses on Baroque
music).
If you are feeling slightly ambitious
and have transportation, drive down
to Detroit and listen to the Detroit
Symphony Orchestra, with music
MANIKAS
RESTAURANT
Serving Breakfast,
Lunch and Dinner.
Open Daily
7:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.
Sunday
10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.
Beer, Wine and Liquor.
307 S. Main St.
663-7449

I

City/State/Zip

Phone_

No. of Season
Tickets Day Price Total
Wednesday 8:00 p.m. $45.00
Wednesday Sr. Citizen 8:00 p.m. $35.00
Thursday 8:00 p.m. $45.00

Thursday Sr. Citizen 8:00 p.m.

$35.00

Friday 8:00 p.m. $50.00
Saturday Matinee 2:00 p.m. $40.00
Sat. Matinee Sr. Cit. and Youth (17, under) $34.00
Saturday 8:00 p.m. $50.00
Postage and Handling .50

THE MICHIGAN THEATER
WELCOMES STUDENTS!
When events happen in Ann Arbor, they happen at the Michigan Theater.
The Michigan Theater is Ann Arbor's premiere performing arts and repertory
film theater. Built in the 1920's, the Michigan is finishing a restoration project
that has turned it into a glittering showplace. The Michigan Theater offers a}
wide range of events and films - and the new interior should not be missed.
For a listing of events pick up a Michigan Theater calendar or the Cinema
Guide, both located in the lobby of the theater.
Coupon books available: 10 admissions/$20.00-SAVE! '
"- - """ """"- "-- -" -" "" -" " -" -" -"-"" -"
500OFF COUPON
---- ~50( off the regular admission price
- limit 2. May not be combinedY
~* with any other offer.
L=NExpires: December 30, 1986.
MICHIGAN DAILY'S BEST MOVIE THEATER WINNER!
Page 12 - The Michigan Doily - Thursday, September 4, 1986

The Philip Jones Brass Ensemble performed at Hill Auditorium earlier this year
director Gunther Herbig. They give
student discounts on tickets; call for
further information.
While college is definitely a time to
make major decisions and commit-
tments, this doesn't mean that you
should leave several years of training
behind merely because you don't
think you have the time or the talent.
Nothing could be further from the
truth. The University offers as many
ways to stay involved with the world
'of music as one could imagine,
allowing your abilities to grow even as
you explore other possibilities.
-'ii
SflCTA ALTY
0DCHICKE N aID
O SHRIMP
0 SEAFOODS
DINNERS *"SANDWICHES *"SIDE ORDERS
CARRYOUTS UK NOIN
OR DELIVRY SERVICE
" PARTY TRAY SERVICE
* ANN ARBOR .
ca1665-2266
MON WEDTURSSUN. $1 OFF W IT
" 1 AM To AM
MRI-SAT. I11 AM TO 3AM 9 OSED TUSDAY

TOTAL PAYMENT ENCLOSED OR.CHARGED

AACT Membership, or
"Are you on the wrong side of the footlights"?
Now, don't thke'us wrong. Buying your season tickets does indeed make you a mem-
ber of AACT, and brings you our monthly newsletter, the Spotlight. And your laughter
and applause bring life to our plays.
But you can also give yourself a great time by joining us behind the footlights.
Can you sing and dance? We need singers and dancers for our two big musicals this
year. Can you paint or sew a seam? If so, we need you to help put together the best
year of our 57 year history. Can you type? Are you great on the telephone? Youcan be
at the center of all the activity by helping at our building. And if you think you can't do
any of those things, well prove you wrong by teaching you on the job. So, as the man
in Pippin says, "Join us! We've got Magic to do!"
Call 662-7282, M-F, 1-4 p.m., for further information.

The Michigan Daily - Thursday,

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