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November 14, 1986 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I

Page 8 -The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 14, 1986
Co-op shows animation

By Lynn Gettleman
After a year of absence, the Ann
Arbor Film Cooperative brings a
world wide collection of animation
to campus this Saturday in the
19th International Tournee of
Animation.
The program, consisting of 20
animated shorts, has been shown
internationally and represents the
best films from various festivals
worldwide . This year's Tournee
includes the 1984 Academy Award
winning short "Charade," a Walt

Dinsney Productions clay-animated
film narrated by Vincent Price,
and "Anijam"-a film made by 22
animaters who each contributed 15
seconds of their own work to the
piece. "Tonie de Petrie"-a film
that uses computer animation to
create a 3-D character-will also be
featured.
According to Glen Mensching of
the AAFC, The Tournee has
existed at the University for over
the past 20 years, and even though
there was no Tournee last year, it

usually occurs annually.
Mensching said that, "Due to great
publicity, last time we ran this, we
had to turn people away."
This year, however, the AAFC
is prepared for a large turnout and
has added an earlier show . This
show along with two others can be
seen at the Modern Languages
Building, on the corner of
Washington and Thayer streets, this
Saturday at 5, 7, and 9 p.m. Tickets
are $2.50 for adults, $1.50 for
childern 12 and under.

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'Be a Clown:
Following in the long tradition of college humor, the Comedy Co. will present their own annual show
tonight through this weekend at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

A A CT's 'Gypsy'

is a rose

OPEN MON.-THURS. 11 10:00
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PHONE: 994-1012

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By John Ganun
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's prod -
uction of Gypsy this weekend
contains 11 of the original
performers from the first AACT
production of the show 22 years
ago. Set primarily in vaudeville
theaters across the county in the
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ASSISTANT EDITORS
Gale Research Company, a major
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'20s and '30s, the show is being
presented in the newly restored
Michigan Theater, where a show
like Gypsy belongs.
Inspired by the memoirs of
legendary stripper Gypsy Rose Lee,
Gypsy tells the story of a mother
and two daughters; the hopeful
young star Baby June, and Louise,
the girl with no talent who
blossoms into the beautiful queen
of burlesque. Arthur Laurents'
book, along with the music of Jule
Styne and Stephen Sondheim's
lyrics create heavy demands on the
musical theatre actor.
From her first line, "Sing out!
Louise," Judy Dow dominates the
action as the pushy, loud-mouthed
stage mother Rose (which she also
played in the original AACT
production over two decades ago.)
Though at times not as overbearing
as the part calls for, Dow gives a
believable performance as a woman
who seems to give everyone she
knows stomach problems. Not
lacking in her performance is a big,
commanding voice required for the
songs originally written for Ethel
Merman. At her best with a song
to sing, Dow demands the full
attention of the audience with her
every word.
A large supporting cast assembled
by director Ted Heusel hold their
own while' Dow is offstage.
Though not always given flattering
staging, they make the most of it
with their energy and desire to
please the audience. At one time or
another, each momentarily steals
the stage whenever they get the
chance.
Irresistable Alicia Holbrook and
Erin Winkler as Baby June and
Baby Louise delight the audience
with "Let Me Entertain You,"
which later becomes the trademark
song for Louise in the second act.
Lisa Andres and Kelly Lambert
replace them as teenage June and
Louise, still struggling through the
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Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

vaudeville routine imposed on them
by their mother. Together, they
perform one of the highlights of
the first act "If Mama Was
Married." Lambert's performance
is remarkable as a singer and an
actress. She pocesses a full,
pleasant' voice which she
manipulates freely for the desired
effect of a young girl or a mature
young lady: Stronger still is her
acting, which adds immeasurably to
the scenes of the show , especially
in the second act. Louise's version
of "Let Me Entertain You" depicts
her rise to fame on the stage as a
shy girl in Wichita, Kansas, to the
highest paid striptease artist in the
country.
Then comes "Rose's Turn," one
of the most emotional and character
insightful songs ever written for the
stage. Judy Dow explores the
depths of this song with
understanding and extols it in her
performance. The last number of
the show, Dow totally immerses
herself in the song and ends up with
a roar of. applause at her feet.
Other highlights of the show
include Charles Sutherland's
performance as Rose's would-be
fourth husband, Herbie, and
Thomas Cooch :as the song and
dance man, Tulsa. Both have a
comfort and ease on stage not
usually found in community
theatre. Sutherland has such a
likeable stage personality that his
own hurt is felt when he rejects
Rose.
The number that stopped the
show, however, came from none of
the main characters, but from
Rebecca Smouse, Marina Seeman,
and Sandra Storer, who advise,
"You Gotta Get a Gimmick," if
you want to be a successful
stripper. With only inches of a
costume to hide behind, Smouse
begins the excellently staged
number'with her big, belty voice,
aided by a trumpet and very
impressive hiprcontrol. Seeman
joins her with an electryfing
performance, then Storer completes
the trio, giving a whole new
meaning to ballet. They're almost
too good.______
Gypsy finishes its run Saturday
with performances at 2 p.m. and 8
p.m.

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LITERATURE PROGRAM
Earn credit as you study
Thoreau, Emerson, Frost,
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* Your guide includes a description and
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MASS MEETING & SLIDE SHOW
Tuesday, November 18, 8:00 pm
AUD. D, ANGELL HALL
For Further Information, Call 761-9579 between 8 8 10 am.

If you enjoy frequent fine dining you'll welcome the Preferred Dining Club. The cost is
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STUDENT THANKSGIVING SEIi
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