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November 14, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-11-14

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I

The Michigan Daily- Friday, November 14, 1986- Page 3
Study outlines problem

0 0
in city.
By EVE BECKER
Ann Arbor needs to overhaul its
public housing system by making
it more physically suitable for
tenants and collecting all back rent
owed - including some from as
long ago as 1976 - according to a
study released by Social Work
graduate student Michelle Richards.
Her study indicated major
problems within the Ann Arbor
Housing Commission, the city
group which oversees public
housing.
THE COMMISSION HAS
suffered losses due to unpaid rent
and has kept public housing, which
is provided for the elderly, the
handicapped, and low-income
families, in poor condition, said
Richards.
The commission has been
plagued by problems, partly
because of a lack of consistent
management. Most of the members
of the commission were hired in
April in an effort to get the group
back on its feet. The group has had
three executive directors since
January.
The city hired Bonnie Newlun in
September as executive director of
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public I
the housing commission, and so far
she has approached the problems
with a no-nonsense attitude, as she
has did in Beloit, Wisc. and
Superior, Wisc.
NEWLUN CITED A
LACK of communication between
staff and tenants, a lack of
enforcement of rent and eviction
policies, and a need to improve
maintenance, update policies, and
standardize forms.
Said commission member Walt
Scheider: "Staff operations have
until recently been governed by
policies so broad and so weakly
supervised that staff members have
been making policy decisions
independently, with little
consistency, and in many cases
capriciously."
Richards indicated in her report
that public housing needs to have
clearer and more enforceable rent

ousing
payment policies, better facilities
for the handicapped, more privacy
in family housing, and help foi
tenants with the transition between
public and private housing.
SHE SAID SENIOR
C I T I Z E N housing is
characterized now by a "universal
sense of fear and uncertainty" and
needs increased security, a police
liason for emergency situations, and
an increased sense of community
which effective tenant councils
could provide.
Newlun said she has begun to
clarify the rent payment and
eviction policies. Tenants are being
sent rent statement plans which
indicate when rent is due and if they
owe any back rent. New payment
plans are also being developed, she
said.
'I have repeatedly heara the same
thing on each one of my visits,"
said Newlun.

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY

Bird's eye view
A bird sits among the last remaining autumn leaves of a tree next to South Quad.

Orchestra reflects 'U' diversity

By VICKI BAUER
Music harmonizes the diverse
interests of the members of the
Campus Orchestra.
The orchestra, comprised of 85
pdergraduates and graduate students
Who are not in the School of
Music, is an eclectic group that
runs the academic gamut from LSA
to engineering to the medical
school.
THOUGH MOST MEM-
BERS of the orchestra have taken
years of private lessons, they don't
plan to pursue professional music
careers. Clarinetist Rick Dustin, a
junior math major, said, "I thought
about majoring in music for a long
time. It would have limited me,
been my only focus. In LSA, I
have variety. I have the best of both
vorlds. I take English and math
courses I'm interested in."
Elizabeth Nemachek, violin
player and LSA sophomore, wants
to work in the business world. She
I*didn't want to major in music
because she "didn't want to practice
s© hard and didn't want to teach."
"I'm not interested in taking all
Studeta
*draw up
draft of
'U'code
(Continued from Page )'
Ruchnagel criticized the
students' proposal because it lacked
sanctions against not only students,
but also administrators and faculty.
'Keeping the enforcement within
the system would bring the
administration under a common
pressure," Rucknagel said. "If
someone in the administration
would overstep our procedure, I
would expect that would set him up
for a legal suit."
Detmining how offenders of a
code would be punished has been
the key issue the council has faced
since beginning its work in October
1984. The University
administration has insisted that a
code is needed to control student
behavior outside the classroon and
to supplement what they see as an
inadequate criminal justice system.
But student members of the
bboard have repeatedly argued that by
imposing academic sanctions of
suspension or expulsion, the
University could infringe upon the
rights of free expression and
dissent.
Read

classes in the School of Music,"
she said.
THOUGH THE
ORCHESTRA members are
amateurs, they still take their work
seriously. Members practice once a
week for two hours under
Conductor Yves Cohen, a doctoral
candidate in conducting, in addition
to practicing on their own.
The Campus Orchestra has
improved in recent years, according
to LSA senior Lisa Sasaki, a fourth
year member. She and other
members attribute much of this
success to the second-year
conductor.
"The quality has improved quite
a bit," Sasaki said. "The first year I
was in orchestra it was more laid
back and not meticulous. As the
years went on, it got better. When
Yves came, the quality improved.
"The conductor in part is
responsible for discipline. The
rehearsals are now more structured
and the conductor expects more."
ORCHESTRA MEMBERS
say Cohen possesses an attitude
essential for producing a quality
sound. Though there is a wide range
of ability and talent among the
members, Cohen challenges each of
them to improve and perform to
their highest potential.
Cohen sets high expectations for
the group. Acccording to members,
his rehearsals are serious, organized,
and enjoyable.
Dusin describes Cohen as a
conductor who "doesn't nag. He
gets people to work, but not in a
condescending way. He gently
pushes people and they respond
naturally."
COHEN HAS IMPOSED
more stringent requirements for
orchestra members. This year, he
turned down 10 students who had
auditioned and last year he turned
down three. In the past, all students

who could play the orchestra's
music were accepted.
Cohen said he wants the
orchestra to play two concerts each
semester instead of one. He also
hopes to encourage more students
to audition, as well as drawing a
larger audience.
Members feel that the orchestra's
last two years have been extremely
productive. Last week the orchestra
performed selections from
Mendelssohn, Mozart, and Respighi
at Hill Auditorium.
GUSTAV MEYER,
conductor of the University
Symphony Orchestra, was
impressed with the Campus
Orchestra's performance. "Their
progress is tremendous," he said.
David Aderente, general manager
for University music ensembles,
describes the Campus Orchestra as a
"provider." "It's a two-way street.
It provides students with an outlet
for their musical interest. At the
same time it offers a learning
experience for the conductor as
well. It continues the educational
process for everyone."
Students in the Campus
Orchestra find playing their
instruments an emotional outlet to
escape college pressures. They get
completely absorbed in their work,
and forget other tensions.
"Playing the clarinet is relaxing
and satisfying. It's a big release.
People of all abilities can get the
same satisfaction. After rehearsal,
I'm relaxed. I don't go to the library
to do homework. I go out and talk
to people," Dustin said.
Practicing is a demanding time
commitment for Campus Orchestra
members. Out of the 85 members,
53 take the orchestra for one credit
and a grade based on attendance and
personal performance. They may
re-audition each semester to move
up in difficulty level.

ItA'i GEOFKA KEPASOTE S COMOPATK)N

I

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The Michigan Union

Dr. Wu's Super Stir

U.S. SENATOR
DONALDW.
RIEGLE, JR.
Speaking on:
"THE SENATE REALIGNMENT
AND OTHER ISSUES"

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