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November 07, 1986 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-11-07
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Books
give wings 9"-
to your
imagination

::

Afterwords
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996-2808 219 S. Main Ann Arbor, MI .. "

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JAPAN
Continued from Page 7
By now I had guaranteed myself
almost every good and proper thing
in life for an insignificant amount
of money. But the most important
thing remained-getting rich. I
gave this a try at the shrine by
scooping water from a water trough
and washing my bills and coins.
There is one catch-when I get rich
I have to donate a Shinto gate, or
"tori", in appreciation. But I wasn't
discouraged because there were
many lined up at the shrine's
entrance.
I thanked the Japanese gods,
"kamisama," before leaving. I threw
them some coins, clapped my hands
twice, bowed once again, then
prayed. After all, all my problems
and worries were solved in one day
and I had the kamisama, the
Kitamuras and their wonderful
country to thank for it.
After a day of ancient Japanese
traditions, the Kitamuras took me
out for dinner-at a French
resturant.
Only in Japan can you expeience
delicious French food and modemn
discos as well as the tradition of the
temples and shrines, traditions that
have stayed with the Japanese for
centuries.

CANADA
Continued from Page 8
province of Ontario, and the city of
Toronto," said Ernie Stapleton,
communication assistant at the
Toronto Tourist and Convention
Information Center. He said some
Americans have the impression that
Canada is all "winter, hockey, and
beer."
"Hockey is big, and we do have
snow, but there is more to Canada
and Toronto than this," said
Stapleton.
Went said the Conservative
Canadian government is trying to
attract a new type of tourist to
Canada, one who will go to
Canadian cities, eat in Canadian
restaurants, attend Canadian
museums-and spend American
money, as opposed to "the guy who
will drive the Winnebago up... and
spends little money except (to buy)
gas for the boat, maybe, and cans of
salmon."
Toronto has been the main
center for American tourists
looking for urban excitement.
According to local travel agents,
weekend packages to Toronto are
very popular with Americans.
"You can go to Toronto for
$100 by train per person, which
includes two .nights in a hotel ,
round trip railtrip, everything
except meals," said John Kosta,
president of Huron Valley Travel.

T~ou can't go to a major city- inth
U.S., like Chicago, at that price."
Toronto has been billed as a
modem, cultural city, and according
to Stapleton, only New York
attracts more theater.
"We're safe, and clean, there are
a lot of things to do in Toronto,
it's not just walking down the
streets at night," said Stapleton.
Indeed, Torontonians have much
about which to boast. It is
clean-very clean, for a city bigger
than Boston or Dallas. A spotless,
efficient subway, trolley, and
commuter train system makes
getting around easy, another rarity
in large North American cities.
Liberal Canadian immigration
laws have made the city attractive
to a wide range of ethnic groups.
Toronto's Chinatown is among the
largest such neighborhoods after
those in San Francisco and New
York; there are also communities of
Latvians, Lithuanians, Greeks,
Italians, and many others.
A twenty-year-old building
boom, still going strong, has given
Toronto a glittering, if not
especially varied, downtown
skyline. First Canadian Place is the
tallest office building outside of the
U.S., and the CN Tower, at over
1,800 feet, is the tallest free-
standing structure anywhere. The
view from above is, naturally,
spectacular, but so is the $6
(Canadian) admission price.
Continued on Page 13

Trains and buses

A,

Alternatives worth
some consideration

Experience
Ann Arbor's newest
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M A G A Z I N E E y day!

By Jeannine Freeman
WHEN WAS THE LAST time
you considered using a bus or train
as a means of transportation to and
from school? If you're like many
University students, your answer
was probably "never." Ellie
Routhenberg, manager of the
Boersma Travel Nickel's Arcade
office, says that more than 98
percent of their student customers
travel strictly by plane. But
depending on your destination,
trains and buses can be a great
bargain.
"Sure, I'd like to travel by by
train. It's much more scenic. But
travelling by Seattle bytrain or bus
would take at least three days," said
Liz Gravitz, an LSA junior from
Washington state. "Three days of
scenery through a bus or train
window isn't my idea of sight-
seeing."
With high competition in the
deregulated airline industry, it's
often as cheap or cheaper to fly than
to take a bus or train. An average
round trip train fare to Boston is
approximately $120. The average
plane fare to the same destination
runs around $118, according to a
Faber Travel agent. So why do
people choose to travel by train or
bus at all?
Engineering senior Perry
Holzknecht often rides the bus
between Ann Arbor and his home
in Akron, Ohio. He said there is
"nothing wrong" with bus
transportation but "if I lived any
further away, I would probably opt
for travelling by airplane."
Of the students asked, only a
small number who live near Ann
Arbor, use buses. Dan Kroll, a
driver for Greyhound bus lines,
echoed this. "Most students who
use the bus live within a 50 mile
radius of Ann Arbor. Unless it's
spring break time, you don't find
too many University of Michigan
students on the buses because it
just takes too. much time for
them... they're in a hurry." The
many stops that buses and trains
must make can become aggravating
during long trips. The 3-4 day
journey involved in lenghty
excursions like those from Ann
Arbor to Seattle can be covered in a
matter of hours by plane.]
Shorter distance train travel,
however, is much cheaper than
flying. Amtrak to Chicago costs
$25.50 one way, $37 Fridays and
Sundays between 10 a.m. and 4
p.m. To fly from Detroit Metro

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WEEKEND/JOHN MUNSON

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atitude
justmnent.
you down? Had it up to here with gray skies, snow
hill factors? Sounds like a little "latitude adjustment" is
Travel Agency arrange a special trip to your favorite
We could change your whole attitude toward winter.

Eat In Or Carry Out

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Round trip air fare
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ARCADE
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We carry:
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" Nexus
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665-7894

A defense
against cancer
can be Cooked up
in your kitchen.
There is evidence that diet and
cancer are related. Follow these
modifications in your daily diet to
reduce chances of getting cancer.
1. Eat more high-fiber foods such
as fruits and vegetables and whole-
grain cereals.
2. Include dark green and deep
yellow fruits and vegetables rich in
vitamins A and C.
3. Include cabbage, broccoli,
brussels sprouts, kohlrabi and
cauliflower.
4. Be moderate in consumption
of salt-cured, smoked and nitrite-
cured foods.
5. Cut down on total fat intake
from animal sources and fats and
oils.
6. Avoid obesity.
7. Be moderate in consumption
of alcoholic beverages.
No one faces cancer alone.
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'

Train travel is interesting, and often
cheaper than flying.
would be at least double-$98
round-trip-and that's with a
number of inconvenient
restrictions. Prices go up from
there.
Similarly, you can go to
Toronto on VIA Rail (the Canadian
system) for $43 U.S. round-trip.
Flying from Detroit starts at $112,
without taxes and with restrictions.
And don't forget to add about $10
and an hour for a limousine to the
airport if you don't have a ride.
While long-distance train travel
may be a luxury that not many can
afford, those students who can find
it a much for relaxing way to
travel. Library Science senior Brett
Nulf, an avid train-traveler, said,
"You'll spend as much time in an
airport, if not more. I hate waiting
forever in a crowded airport only to
have my plane delayed because of
fog or something. I find a long
train ride a fortunate opportunity to
sit back and relax."
Over 95 percent all train travel
by students is to Toronto or
Chicago. One Faber Travel agent
said, "The majority of all Ann
Arbor to Toronto or Ann Arbor to
Chicago tickets are weekend-type
packages... it is really a shame, but
long distance travel has become
quite unpopular. Students do not
want to spend time traveling when
they could be home instead."

Bill Street Forum
Celebration of Jewish Arts presents
Amos Oz & Tamir

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1.

PAGE 12

WEEKEND/NOVEMBER 7, 1986

WEEKEND/NOVEMBER 7, 1986

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