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November 07, 1986 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-11-07

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, November 7, 1986 -Page 5

Honorary degree board releases minutes

By ROB EARLE
The committee examining the
'University's honorary degree policy
-has agreed to release minutes of its
meetings.
Committee members will not be
mentioned by name in the minutes,
and the committee has agreed that
no member will speak openly of
the committee's proceedings until
the final recommendations are
published.
T THE MINUTES OF the
committee's Oct. 28 meeting,

obtained by the Daily yesterday,
show the committee discussed the
objectives of honorary degrees and
the pros and cons of awarding them.
The committee also agreed to
hold an open forum Nov. 11.
The panel, chaired by Rackham
Dean John D'Arms, was ordered by
the Board of Regents last spring
after students protested against the
current policy, which forbids
awarding honorary degrees to those
who cannot accept them in person.
This rule kept jailed South African

leader Nelson Mandela from
receiving an honorary degree last
winter.
THE OCT 28 minutes say the
problems in awarding honorary
degrees may stem from using a
single set of criteria to judge
different candidates.
"It was noted that major
difficulties in outlining policies and
procedures stem from the
assumption that a single set of
guidelines should be developed to
select a slate of people who are

honored for very different reasons,"
the minutes say. "It was suggested
that it might be possible to develop
seperate sets of objectives, (each set
aimed at a different sort of case),
that collectively would serve to
guide the selection of the desired
slate of awareness."
"It was also noted that there are
awards other then honorary degrees
that meet many of the objectives
mentioned for honorary degrees."
The committee also discussed
arguments for and against awarding

r

Turnout
low in
.second
Sdistrict

(Continued from Page1)
in 1982-suggests that Baker was
successful in getting his supporters
out to vote in a low turnout year.
"If someone can organize well,
particularly in an off-year election,
that can have an effect," he said.
THROUGH TURNOUT
WAS low, local election workers
were surprised at the numbers of
voters. LSA senior Larry Mallon,
precinct captain at Markley, said, "I
was surprised turnout was so high.
The Baker campaign got a lot of

people out to vote, though in our
precinct they didn't all vote for
Baker."
Baker seems to have drawn out
the most voters throughout the
city, not just in student precincts.
Although Pursell has consistently
won Ann Arbor in the past, the city
went for Baker this year. With
notable exceptions, such as the
conservative Lansdowne
subdivision in southern Ann Arbor,
neighborhoods throughout the city

strongly favored Baker.
Traugott doubts that that Gov.
James Blanchard's landslide victory
over Republican challenger William
Lucas had much of a coattail effect
for Baker. He noted that
Republicans maintained control of
the State Senate and that no
incumbent U.S. Congressmen in
the state were defeated. The
overriding message of the election,
Traugott said, was satisfaction with
the status quo.

honorary degrees. Cornell, Berkeley, and M.I.T., do
"It was noted that some not award honorary degrees," the
institutions, notably Stanford, minutes said.
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Official doubts code's

power again!
(Continued from Page 1)
ecember, I feel that we will have
the president's version in January,"
said councilmember Howard
$rabson, a social work professor.
MARVIN PARNES,
University housing program
director, criticized the student
members of the council for
resisting any code. "There is no
excuse that the students at this
university who are victimized have
s little recourse, and I get irritated
4t the unwillingness of some
members " to think about other
concerns,." he said.
But students on the board still
hesitate to give the University the
authority to use academic sanctions
as a means of enforcement. "I am
hot unwilling to work on issues
such as assault, but I do not agree
with the method of enforcement
that the administration desires," said
Jennifer Faigel, a student
councilmember.
Although Faigel said students
who might participate in protests
would feel threatened by a code, she
said they should still participate in
the process of writing one.
"IF THERE IS going to be
one written, the person who is the
most against it should be a part of
the process to insure that all
interests will be balanced and
protected," said Faigel.
Heatley, in supporting a code to
cover violent crimes, expressed
dissatisfation with the way the civil
courts handle crimes ranging from
sexual assault to theft. He told the
council that campus security gets
24,300 calls a year, with about 100
physical assaults a month, and at
least one sexual assault a month.
i He said a code would help the
Victim of a crime such as
sharassment because it would
provide a way to separate and
punish the aggressor.
Under the civil courts system,

dissent

Heatley said, it often takes three
years to complete the process of an
injunction-during which time the
accused would remain in the
University community.
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Services daily, 5 p.m.; Midnight (exc.
Saturday).
All Are Welcome
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UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave. -663-5560
(Between Hill and South U.)
DR. PAUL FOELBER, Interim Pastor
Communion Service at 10:30 a.m.
Bible Study at 9:15 a.m.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH,
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between Hill and S. University St.)
William Hillegonds, Senior Minister
Sunday Worship Services at 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Church School, including nurseries at
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Sunday Bible Study 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Communion Service
7:00 p.m.
AMERICAN BAPTIST
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Huron St. (between State & Division)
Sundays: 9:55 Worship, 11:25 Bible
Study groups for both Undergrads
and Graduate Students.
Wednesday: 5:30 Supper (free) and
Fellowship.
CENTER OPEN EACH DAY
for information call 663-9376
ROBERT B. WALLACE, PASTOR

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