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November 06, 1986 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-11-06

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cl be

Ninety-seven years of editorial freedom

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Vol. XCVII -No. 46

Copyright 1986, The Michigan Doily

Ann Arbor, Michigan - Thursday, November 6, 1986

Ten Pages

Results
beats B
By STEPHEN GREGORY pressure if het
Incumbent Congressman Carl for these progra
Pursell defeated economics graduate GARY CA'
student Dean Baker with 59 percent for Pursell, sai
of the vote, according to unofficial pleased with ou
results released yesterday. declined to cor
Of Pursell's five bids for the Pursell could
second district congressional seat, comment.
only two have been closer. In 1980 More than
Pursell defeated challenger Kathleen worked on Ba]
O'Reilly by a margin of 57 percent cluding nume
to 41 percent. In 1976, in his first union laborers.I
race for Congress, Pursell upset to his support
current Ann Arbor Mayor Ed Pierce to these groups
by just 344 votes. Baker favor
Baker said that although he lost,
he feels that his campaign "accom-
plished an incredible amount. I
don't think anyone thought this
was possible.
"WE HAVE a strong organ-
ization developing out of this
the campaign united district Demo-
crats, mobilized a large number of WASHING
people, and improved contacts be-
tween the Baker campaign and the elections rejthat
Democratic Party district-wide. electin that
Baker said he is considering power in the Se'
running again in 1988. "We'll want majority in the
to keep this organization together," Reagan offre
he said. 100th Congrc
In a congratulatory letter to Pur- agena reman
sell, Baker said he hopes Pursell's final two years
"next term in Congress is a Paul Kirk de
productive one for the district and.Pauvid "
the nation." Baker also wrote that prlogical lift"
he expects Pursell to "keep his loicaift" y
commitment" to Medicare and landslids.
social security.
"He's going to feel a lot of See ELEC

in:
ak
tries to cut funding
ins," Baker said.
TES, a spokesman
d, "We were quite
ur performance." He
rmment further, and
not be reached for
1,000 volunteers
ker's campaign, in-
rous farmers and
Baker attributed this
of issues important
ed initiating legis-

t
tI

ursell

er 59-
lation to prevent industries from
closing a factory without giving
employees either 90 days notice, an
opportunity to help save the plant
from closing, or severance pay.
Baker also favored legislation
restricting amounts commodity
farmers could sell. This would
reduce total supply, raise the market
price of the commodity, and provide
farmers with more money.
BAKER SAID his campaign
drew a fair number of Republicans
to his campaign. He said Pursell's
support for increased funding for the

41%
Contra rebels in Nicaragua induced
many of the switch-overs.
"It's very clear that almost no
one supports him there," Baker
said, "and if he keeps voting the
way he's been voting, he's going to
,make the opposition even
stronger."
State voters were friendly to
incumbents in Michigan's congres-
sional elections Tuesday, as two
potential cliffhangers failed to
materialize and the state's U.S.
House delegation remained split 11-
See BAKER, Page 3

inocrats celebrate
ruse, Senate gains

TON (AP)-Dem-
yesterday in midterm
restored them to
nate and padded their
e House. President
cooperation with the
ess and said "our
s unchanged" in his
in the White House.
National Chairman
-clared the results
emendous psycho -
for a party twice
Reagan's presidential
TION, Page 5

SENATE HOUSE
_______Rep. Dem. Rep. Dem.
Old 53 47 182 253
New 45 55. 173 257
Undecided 5

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Daily Photo by JOHN MUNSON
Duck days
Engineering freshmen Monica Simpson and Robert Khami relax by the
Music School pond, feeding stale potato chips to the ducks.

Gain/ Loss

TL

8 G8

L2 |G2

~

Student had bright future, friends remember

By MELISSA BIRKS
Stephen Hannagan likedto lift weights with his
housemates at the Intramural Building, but when he
complained about being sore, they would tease him
with the phrase, "Argue for your limitations, and
soon they will be yours." According to friends of
Hannagan; that phrase embodied Hannagan's philo-
sophy toward life.
Hannagan, a first year business school student,
died early Saturday morning after falling off a bal-
cony.
"We used to kid him -it kind of stood for the
way he was. If he wanted to do something, he'd do
b it," said one of Hannagan's former housemates.

HANNAGAN WAS joking around with some
other people at a party on the 1700 block of Geddes.
He had lifted up another party-goer, Michigan
Technological University junior Todd Bengtsson,
around the legs, according to Sgt. John King of the
Ann Arbor Police Department.
"He kept backing up; I was looking over my
shoulder and beginning to get a little uncomfortable,"
Bengtsson said. At that point, Bengtsson said,
Hannagan backed up against a waist-high concrete
rail. He released Bengtsson, but lost balance and fell
to the pavement below. Bengtsson had grabbed onto
the railing and was helped up.
Bengtsson, Hannagan, and one of Hannagan's

housemates had gone to two other parties shortly
before arriving at the Geddes Street apartment com-
plex.
Hannagan entered the business school fall term to
study marketing. He wanted to be a "marketing wizard
in the entertainment industry," according to a data
sheet he submitted to his marketing professor.
BUT HIS OTHER activities stretched from
working on political campaigns to running mara-
thons. He was director of the University's
Entrepreneurs Club and a member of Delta Kappa
Epsilon fraternity. He started his own business last
year, called Creativtee Shirts, which, involved
producing t-shirts for organizations around campus.

U' to enact
smoking ban
By KELLY McNEIL
A University-wide smoking ban will probably be
adopted later this week, to be effective Jan. 1,
University officials say.
The University policy would be stiffer than the
recently passed Michigan Clean Air Act because
smoking sections would be designated only in areas
such as lobbies, not in offices or other closed areas.
The Clean Air Act will take effect Jan. 1.
University Personnel Representative Ron Dick and
other members of the University smoking policy
task force will present the policy to the Executive
Officers this week.
The more restrictive University policy will be
approved this week, according to Personnel Director
James Thiry.
SOME CAMPUS buildings have already
enforced new smoking policies. The Undergraduate
Library confined smoking to Room 8 in the
basement. Until last September, smokers were
entitled to use the entire basement.
See RULE, Page 2

Hannagan, a native of Birmingham, Mich., was
the campaign manager for Oakland County
Commissioner David Moffit. In 1983, he placed
eighth in the 1983 Free Press Marathon. -
One of his housemates remembers Hannagan
"always on the go." He studied in the early morning
hours, insisting that his housemates stay up and
watch "Late Night With David Letterman" with him.
Hannagan was pledging Delta Sigma Pi, the
business school fraternity, this fall. According to his
pledge supervisor, business school senior Steve Price,
Hannagan was enthusiastic about the fraternity. When
Hannagan had to interview the 34 active members as
a pledge activity, he videotaped each member.
City may ask
local churches to
house homeless
By KERY MURAKAMI
Coordinators of the city's two homeless shelters
hope an Ann Arbor City. Council resolution
unanimously passed Monday will lessen the number
of homeless people their shelters turn away each
night.
The resolution authorizes the city to ask local
churches to take on about 20 homeless people a night
during the winter. Under the plan, according to Arbor
Haven Shelter Director James Wilson, churches
would take turns housing the shelters' overflow
beginning in December, when colder weather
endangers the health of the homeless.
The resolution also sets up two new homeless
shelters that will house only women and families.
ACCORDING TO Kathy Zick, director of the
Ann Arbor Homeless Association, the Huron Street
shelter is always filled to its limit of 48 occupants,
and another 15 homeless people are turned away each
night. Because of the cold weather, that number
grows during the winter.
See CHURCH, Page 2
INSIDE
DEMOCRACY: Opinion comments on the state
of representative politics. See Page 4.

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
Peter Sharon, an LSA senior, smokes in the Undergraduate Library. The UGLi restricts smoking to a single
room in the basement.

TODAY-
Mets mania
T

manded the Mets apologize "for the begavior of their
security force fans" and that Koch "dress up in a
bunny outfit." Flynn spokesman Frank Costello
said Koch would get his flag back because the one
flying in Boston was bought by Boston to use
rather than Koch's flag, which reads, "I Love the

"but that doesn't mean that today's students are total
fashion conformists." Most students, including
those of us in the Midwest, prefer a casual look, the
survey said. One student at the University of
Minnesota in Minneapolis told surveyors that
although students are looking less preppV these

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