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October 30, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-30

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The Michigan Daily, Thursday, October 30, 1986- Page 3

Gould enthralls
Rackham crowd

By PHILIP I. LEVY
With his sleeves rolled up and
arms waving, Stephen Jay Gould
captivated an audience of hundreds
last night in Rackham Lecture Hall.
His speech, entitled "Advances in
Evolutionary Theory: The Current
Status of Darwinism," touched on
topics as diverse as laissez-faire
economics, coral reefs, and the
genitalia of spotted hyenas.
The Harvard paleontologist used
Charles Darwin as a vehicle to
expound on evolutionary theory. He
attacked Darwin's image as a "saint
of science," speculating that if
Darwin were a modem student, he
wouldn't get into a good graduate
school because he was unskilled in
math and languages.
HE DESCRIBED and then
critiqued Darwin's theory of evo-
lution. He said Darwin asserted that
small and undirected genetic vari-
ations are transformed into evo-

lutionary changes through natural
selection.
Darwin said natural selection
was the only source of change and
worked only on living organisms.
Gould said, however, that evo-
lutionary change could result from
other factors, such as chance.
Gould filled his speech with
analogies and illustrated it with
slides. Although the intricate ar-
guments were not always under-
standable to the layman, the speech
was lively and the audience-packed
into every corner of the auditorium
- was clearly appreciative.
GOULD GAINED fame from
his own theory of evolution- that
of "punctuated equilibria"- and
from his writing skills, according
to Charles Brace, curator of the
University's museum of anthro-
pology.
Because of his theory, Gould is a

Top SD]
By MARTIN FRANK
University officials do not
foresee any change in funding for
the Strategic Defense Initiative
research following the resignation
of President Reagan's top physicist
working on the "Star Wars"
program. But Stategic Defense
Initiative opponents say the move
is a blow to the program.
The physicist, Peter Hagelstein,
designed an X-ray laser, a nuclear
bomb that explodes in outer space
and directs X-rays in columns of
beams toward nuclear missiles. He
LONG ISLAND
ICE TEAS
AND
FREE
PIZZA
ONLY AT
THURSDAY
10 p.m.- close 338S.STATE
996-9191

[physicist
worked at the Lawrence Livermore
National Laboratory before leaving
to become a teacher and non-
military researcher at the
Massachuesetts Institute of
Technology. He gave no reasons for
his resignation.
THE SDI program has
allocated nearly $25 million to
universities nationwide to conduct
research for Reagan's Star Wars
program. The University has
received $1.2 million for seven
projects and has eight projects
worth $6.2 million still pending.

resigns
Physics Prof. Daniel Axelrod,
one of 49 professors to sign a
petition against accepting SDI
funding, thinks Hagelstein's
departure will have impact upon the
public because it shows that most
physicists think Star Wars won't
work.
The SDI program will face some
short term problems, according to
Axelrod, because a replacement
must be found.
FORMER Michigan Student
Assembly military research advisor
See 'U', Page 5

Gould...
speaks on evolution
very controversial figure, Brace
said. He represents "a good-sized
branch" of thought on evolution.
The theory of punctuated equilibria
asserts that evolution occurs in
distinct spurts, rather than through
a continual, gradual process. Brace
said many scientists are skeptical of
Gould's work, though, favoring a
concept of more gradual evolution.
Gould writes a monthly column
in Natural History magazine and
has authored books including Hen's
Teeth and Horse's Toes, and The
Panda's Thumb.

Students interested in attending
THE MICHIGAN/
SARAH LAWRENCE PROGRAM
IN FLORENCE, ITALY
are invited to attend an informational meeting and
to meet the program director, Prof. Judith
Serafini-Sauli of Sarah Lawrence College.
THURSDAY, OCT. 30
4:00p.m.
ROOM 180 TAPPAN HALL

11

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M04

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Campus Cinema
Never Cry Wolf (Carroll Ballard,
1983), CG, 7 & 9 p.m., Angell Aud
rA.
Charles Martin Smith plays a wolf
nut who tries to live alone among the
wild wolves of the north. From the
director of The Black Stallion.
Performances
Passion Field and The Missiles
- UAC, Soundstage, and Special
Events, 9 p.m., U-Club (763-1107).
Come join the fun at the Halloween
Bash tonight at the U-Club.
David Copperfield - Prism Pro -
ductions, 5:30 & 8:30 p.m., Michigan
Theater, (665-4755).
Be amazed by the man who made the
Statue of Liberty disappear, as he
performs in two special Halloween
shows.
Oedipus by Sophocles - Project
Theatre, 8 p.m., Mendelssohn Theater.:
The Project Theater players, under
the direction of John Brown, perform
athis classic play.
Ferron - Major Events, 7:30 p.m.,
Power Center (763-8587).
Don't miss this great show as
Ferron rocks the power center.
Top. Girls - The Brecht Co., 8
p.m., Residential College Aud. (995-
0532).
F Speakers
Winfred Lampert - "Testing
Hypothese Proposing a Metabolic
Advantage for Vertically Migrating
Zooplankton," Dept. of Biology, 7
p.m., 3056 Natural Science Bldg.
David Finkel - "Poland: Rev -
olutionary Socialist Opposition from
1964 to Today," Against the Current,
7:30 p.m., First Unitarian Universalist
Church, 4605 Cass, at Forest, Rohm
200.
Yun Lee - "The Koobi Fora Field
School," Museum of Anthropology,
noon, 2009 Exhibit Museum Bldg.
Robert Kelly - "Investment Strat -
- egies for Independent Options Traders,
Finance Club, 4:15 p.m., Wolverine
Room, Business School.
K. Zinn - "The Use of Personal

Computers for Preparing Classroom
Materials," CRLT, 7 p.m., 3001
School of Education Bldg.
R. Rivlin - "Dietary Fiber and
Cancer," Human Growth &
Developement, 4 p.m., MLB 3.
P. Blumenfeld - "Research,"
CTPS, 11:10 p.m., Tribute Room,
1322 SEB.
S. Grand -"The Shear Structure of
the Mantle Beneath the North
American Plate," Geological Science, 4
p.m., 4001 CC Little Bldg.
Wallace Stegner - "Consequences:
Western Society, Western Character,
Western Myth," Law School, 4 p.m.,
120 Hutchins Hall.
Michael MacQeen-"The Comm -
unist Seizure of Power in Poland:
Social or National Revolution," Center
for Russian and East European Studies,
7:30 p.m., Lane Hall Commons
Room.
I. Singh - "Agricultural Household
Models: Extensions, Applications and
Policy," Res. on Econ. Devel., 12:30
pm., CRED Conf. Rm., 361 Lorch.
Hall.
L. Maloney - "Distributional Ass-
umptions and the Theory of Signal
Detectability," Mental Health Res.
Inst., 12:15 p.m., 2055 MHRI.
Hope Palmer - "Overnight Sen -
sations - The Passing of Beauty in the
1980s," School of Art, 7 p.m., Art &
Architecture Aud.
C. Dolan-Green- "Taking Charge
of Your Future," Mich. Commission
for Women, 4 p.m., Rackham Aud.
Marc Ellis - "Faith & Social
Justice: Faithfulness in an Age of
Holocaust," Ethics & Religion, noon,
Guild House, 802 Monroe.
G. Was - "Metastable Phase For -
mation by Ion Beam Mixing," Dept. of
Chemistry, 4 p.m., 1200 Chem. Bldg.
B. Blue - "Record Handling with
*COMBINE," Computing Center., 7
p.m., 1013 NUBS.
Meetings
His House Christian Fellow-
ship - 7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann.
Dickens Fellowship - 8 p.m.,
Canterbury House, 218 N. Division.
Ann Arbor Brewers Guild - 7
p.m., 117 E. Ann.

Democratic Socialists of Amer -
ica - 7:30 p.m., 4307 Union.
The Barbaric Yawp, Literary
Magazine, & the Undergraduate
English Assoc. - 7 p.m., 7th
floor, Haven Hall.
Hebrew Speaking Club - 4
p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Adopt a Political Prisoner of
Apartheid - 6:30 p.m., 111 West
Engineering Bldg.
United Farm Workers Support
Group - 6:30 p.m., 3909 Union.
Furthermore
In Appreciation: Robert Sluss-
er - Center for Russian & East Euro -
pean Studies, 4 p.m., Room 200, Lane
Hall (764-0351).
Star Wars: Hope or Hoax -
Coalition for Arms Control Second
District, 8 p.m., Rackham Amphi-
theatre (663-4897).
Second Annual Sexual Assault
Awareness Days - U-M Sexual
Assault Pryerition & Awareness
Center, 11-1 p.m., 2-3:30 p.m., Mich.
Union Pond Rm. (763-5865).
Taking Charge of Your Future:
Career Developement at the
University of M i c h i g a n -
Comm. for Women, 4 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheatre (764-3423).
Impact Jazz-Dance Workshop --
UAC, 7- 8:30 p.m., Union Ballroom.
Career Planning and Placement
- "Introductory Practice Interviewing,"
3:10 p.m., 3200 SAB; "Businesp Week
Careers-Career Search Workshop," 4:10
p.m. and 7 p.m., Angell Hall Aud. B;
Library Tour, 4:10 p.m., 3200 SAB.
Send announcements of up-
coming events to "The List,"
c/o The Michigan Daily, 420
Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Mich., 48109. Include all per-
tinent information and a con-
tract phone number. We must
receive announcements for
Friday and Sunday events at
least two weeks before the
event, and announcements for
weekday events must be
received at least two days
before the event.

Anniversary Sale
Pre Christmas Savings
Four Days Only
Thurs., Oct. 30, Fri., Oct. 31, Sat., Nov. 1, Sun., Nov. 2

LET US MAKE-UP
YOUR FACE
FOR HALLOWEEN!

OCTOBER 31st .
NOON -7p.m.
MOST FACES-$9.95
DETAILED FACES-$19.95
20rng
r Ct+r+tA DI7CI

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