100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 24, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 24, 1986 -Page 3

Levin blasts
*U.S. tax reform

Fall Specials:
convertible desk bed & student bed rolls
A GREAT LAKES FUTON
" comfortable for knees and elbows
" firm, all cotton support
" no squeaky springs - portable
" folds into a couch - covers available
205 N. Main St. " Ann Arbor.
663-2202

By MANALI DESAI
U.S. Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich)
blasted the tax reform bill
yesterday, saying that it is
senseless legislation.
Speaking before an audience of
about 100 students at Lorch Hall,
Levin said, "It makes no sense to
me to raise taxes on folks here by
closing tax loopholes, raising
corporate taxes, and using it for
anything other than the largest
deficit we have had in history."
LEVIN SAID he opposes the
tax bill for several reasons. He
accused the government of
collecting revenue from people who
pay the minimum taxes and then
"using the revenue for uneven tax
cuts instead of deficit cuts."
He also said the new bill raises
taxes for one out of five people
while cutting funds. for food aid
programs and education. "We
cannot justify, in my good
conscience, tax cuts in this kind of
deficit environment," Levin said.
Levin also feels that raising
corporate taxes is "going to make
us less competitive in the world
where we already have a huge trade
deficit."
Levin, who was elected in1978
and re-elected in 1984, is known for
his aggressive stand on opposing
the tax reform law and the Strategic
Defense Initiative.
DURING HIS 90-minute talk

sponsored by the Michigan
Economic Society, Levin supported
the Gramm-Rudman-Hollings Act
and limited drug testing laws, but
advocated trading SDI for an arms
control agreement with the Soviet
Union.
In defense of the Gramm-
Rudman-Hollings Act, Levin said
voting for anything less "than
across-the-board cuts is doing
nothing." The Senator said
Congress and President Ronald
Reagan were deadlocked on the
issues of protecting domestic
programs and the defense build-up
and voting for Gramm-Rudman
"was the best way to get out of it."
Levin advocated spending more
money on domestic programs,
closing tax loopholes, and
imposing duty on imported
products to reduce the $2.3 trillion
deficit.
In a talk given earlier yesterday
to Political Science 417, The
Legislative Process, Levin said that
the Iceland summit meeting
between Reagan and Soviet Leader
Mikhail Gorbachev brought
disarmament talks to a new level,
where the possibility of eliminating
nuclear arms is becoming a reality.
He said that although he is pleased
with the progress, he would
compromise SDI to eliminate
nuclear weapons.

/e$44

- apparel
" jewelry
- accessories

- - - 325 e. liberty - ann arbor, michigan - 995.4222
1st Anniversary Celebration!

f

DAILY Photo by JAE KIM

U.S. Senator Carl Levin speaks at a meeting of the Michigan Economic
Society yesterday.

Professors debate freedom of research

V.

'-

I

By MARTIN FRANK
The proposed guidelines for
classified research should make all
research results publishable and
available for public inspection,
proponents of tighter guidelines
said yesterday at the second of three
forums on the University's research
policies.
Dissenters said, however, that
such a limitation would impinge
upon academic freedom for
researchers who would like access
to- classified material. Those
researchers could not do the research
because the sponsor does not want
it published, they said.
UNDER THE proposed

guidelines, researchers cannot
engage in research that would allow
the sponsor to classify material.
Students, faculty, and the public
participated the debate, called "The
Responsibility and Openness of
Research," held last night at
Rackham amphitheater.
Thomas Juster, director of the
Institute for Social Research,
maintained that openness, which
would require publishing research
results, would not hinder academic
freedom because sponsors who want
projects done at the University
would not require results to be
classified. The Univerity does not
want sponsors that cannot adjust

their policies to meet the
Univerity's standards, he said.
OPENNESS also ensures that
researchers would not engage in
projects that can kill or maim
humans, said Juster. This clause is
in the current guidelines, but has
been omitted from the proposed
guidelines.'
Philosophy Prof. Carl Cohen
disagreed with this view.
Researchers are denied their
opportunity to do research because
either the sponsor requires them to
classify some material or their
results cannot be published within
one year's time, as required by the
proposed guidelines, Cohen said.

An example of the such a
scenario is political science Prof.
Raymond Tanter's project, which
would have studied alternative
methods to arms control. It was
rejected because he needed access to
classified information and the
results could not be published
within one year after the funding
period has expired.
UNFAIR JOB
ADVANTAGE:
A KINKO'S
RESUME.
Stand apart from the crowd
with a sharp-looking profes-
sional resume from Kinko's.
kink's
Open 24 Hours
540 E. LIBERTY
761-4839

i~'U~IENJOY THI'
CELEBRATION SPECIAL
CHICKEN $8.95 LUNCH OR DINNE
BEEF 8.95 BEGINNING SEPTEMBER 26t
SHRIMP 9.95 THRU OCTOBER

1S
L.
R
A

RESTAURANT & BAR
326 South Main Street . Ann A bo M ichign 48104 * 663 ssss

e

MARC dep't boasts flexibility

r

(C
or school.

Continued from Page 1)

MARC courses are cross-listed
with other departments. The
program encourages students to take
courses in the various LSA
departments and University schools
such as music, art, and law. The
only requirement is that students
take courses relating to the
medieval period or the Renaissance.
"I love it," says MARC major
Leslie Bodden. She added, however,
that one drawback of the program is
the small selection of relevant
courses.
BODDEN, an LSA junior, said
the program's plusses include a trip
to the Newberry Library for
Renaissance Studies in Chicago, a

with another concentration,
according to Mermier. "I am the
one who encouraged them. One
major gives them a solid
background, and a MARC
background gives them the ability
to focus on an avocation simply for
their interest."
The MARC department received
a grant in 1975, a year after it
began, from the National
Endowment for the Humanities.
One hundred fifty students enrolled
in the program that year and many
lived in a 'MARC house' in the
Law Quad.
BUT TIMES have changed for
MARC. When the grant expired,
the program's enrollment declined.
Last year five students were declared

the new core courses will "give a
coherence to the other courses" that
concentrators take.
Concentrators would be required
to take four core courses, two on
medieval times and two on the
Renaissance. "The core courses will
vary constantly from year to year,"
Mermier said. "I want to keep the
flexibility, while still giving an
identity to the program."
Last week the LSA curriculum
committee approved the new
requirements. Mermier said the
proposal's final hurdle is to get
Steiner's approval. "Is the dean
willing to honor his committment?
I think he is a man of his word,"
Mermier said.
If the new requirements do take
effect, Mermier will be required to
find two senior professors to teach
the core courses each semester.
MARC is exclusively an
undergraduate program. According
to Mermier, the University is
probably the only college in the
nation that has an undergraduate
program on medieval and
Renaissance times without offering
a graduate program.
"It is bad because there is no
continuity in what we are doing,"
Mermier said. The University has
always been reluctant in considering
a grad program, Mermier said,
adding that failing to provide a
graduate program "is a grave
mistake."

n

'I hope no med. school looks at me and says, "Don't
let her in, she's a MARC major."...I don't think it
will mark against me, but if it does, I'd much rather
be a MARC major than a doctor.'
-Leslie Bodden, LSA junior

- - - $2 .A A "l Shows Befo -e
1214 S. UNIVERSITY 668-6098
COLOR OF MONEY (R)
Sat. & Sun. 2:00, 4:30, 7:00,.9:30
Fri. & Mon-Thurs. 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
r cOOiE KEP;ASOTES p~OAATKlilN
3020 WASHTENAW AVE. 4341630
COLOR OF MONEY (R)
Sat. & Sun. 2:00,.4:30,.7:00.9:30
Fri.: Mon.-Thurs. 4:30, 7:00,9:30
TRICK OR TREAT (R)
Sat. &Sun.1:15,315.515,7:15.9:15
Fri &Mon Thurs 515 715 915
T O GORGE KERkWOTES 0RA1PIK4
231 S. STATE 662-52%6
THAT'S LIFE (PG)
Daily at 2:30, 7:20,.9:30
A FINE MESS (PG).
Daily at 5:15 only
STAND BY ME (R)
Daily at 2:45, 7:30, 945
OUT OF BOUNDS (R)
Daily at 5:30 only
TRICK OR TREAT (R)
Daily at2:15.5:00,.7:00,9:00
SOUL MAN (PG-13)
Daily at 2:00, 5:00, 7:10, 9:20
9'2 WEEKS (R) STAND BY ME (R),
TRICK OR TREAT (R),
SOUL MAN (PG-13)
Midnight Fri. & Sat.

Toshiko Akiyoshi Trio
Saturday, November 8
7:30 and 10:00 pm
The Ark
Johnny Griffin Quartet
Saturday, November 22
7:30 and 10:00 pm
The Ark
Bobby McFerrin
Monday, December 8
Power Center 8:00 p.m.
SZ
eeise
Tickets available at PJ's
Records, Schoolkids
Records, The Michigan
Union Ticket Office and
all Ticket World locations.
Charge by phone 763-TKTS

tentative trip to Italy in the
summer, and that the program's
director is the concentration advisor
to all MARC majors.
"It's stuff like that you
probably couldn't get in a larger
major," Bodden said.
Although the major in
unconvential, Bodden doesn't think
her major will affect her chances for
admittance to medical school.
"I hope no med school looks at
me and says, 'Don't let her in,
she's a MARC major,"' Bodden
said. "I don't think it will mark
against me, but if it does, I'd much

as MARC majors.
As with many University
programs, budget constraints have
affected MARC. But MARC has a
unique problem because it must
rely on other departments for cross-
listed courses. "Fewer and fewer
courses on the medieval and
Renaissance periods exist in other
departments," Mermier said.
Last year Mermier and Fraser
asked LSA Dean Peter Steiner for
more funding. "We were a program
without significance," Mermier
said. "We were other people's
classes.
"I said to the dean- I need vou to

BLOOM COUNTY
OH NO-.
a'

Sponsored by Counseling Services
76-GUIDE
An anonymous, confidential.
peer counseling phone-line.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan