100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 04, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


.
A

get
By MARTIN FRANK
The University was awarded three
major Department of Defense projec-
ts this summer that could significan-
tly increase the amount of research
money the University receives from
the Pentagon.
University officials currently
negotiating with the defense
department predict researchers
will receive between $20 and $25
million, although the amount could be
as high as $32 million.
The contracts, which are part of the
University Research Initiative - a-
federal program designed to:
revitalize the nation's research"
universities - have raised fears that
this research would "militarize"
the University.
Raises objections
Defense funding totalled $7.7
million in 1984-85, about 5 percent
of the University's research budget.
The URI contracts could more than
double that amount.
"Those projects are shaping the
dependence of the University towards
accepting military contracts which
will tie up the University with the
Pentagon," said Ingrid Kock, former
military research advisor for the
Michigan Student Assembly.
Thirty students held a brief
picket outside the laboratory of Elec-
trical Engineering and Computer
Science Prof. George Haddad in July
after the awards were announced.
Haddad, whose $14.6 million project
was the largest of the University's
URI projects, will study methods of
increasing the speed of computer
microchips.
Researchers happy
"This is one of the best projects
available," he said. "It is badly
needed as I will be working with
graduate students who will definitely
help with such a highly competitive
program."

'These projects are shaping the indepen-
dence of the University towards accep-
ting military contracts, which will tie up
the University with the Pentagon.'
-Ingrid Kock, former MSA
military research advisor

- The Michigan Daily - Thursday, September 4, 1986 - Page 3
s defense contracts

of the University's total federal
research funds.
Naval Architecture Prof. Robert
Beck is supervising another URI
project, a $9.9 million endeavor that
will study the problem of fluid
movement around ships, with the goal
of improving hull designs.
The other project, supervised by
Metallurgical and Materials
Engineering Prof. Ronald Gibala,
will focus on improving lightweight
materials that are reliable for high
temperatures for aircraft engines,
frames, and skins. Gibala's project
will cost $8.4 million.

Haddad was not present at the
protest.
Despite the opposition, University
officials support the research and are
optimistic about the grants. Only 71 of
the more than 1000 proposals submit-
ted nationwide were selected, and the
University won three of the largest.
"I'm very excited about these
awards," said Engineering Dean
Charles Vest, "URI is very important
to research universitiesslike ours
because it provides funds for
graduate students as well as equip-
ping our new laboratories with
modern equipment."
Vest added that he does not con-
sider the URI a military endeavor,
though it is funded through the defen-
se department.
"The URI deals with areas impor-
tant to us and we are not using it for
weapons development," he said.
Vest and University Vice President
for Research Linda Wilson could not
estimate how much the new projects
would increase the Universities per-
centage of defense funding, but they
did say it would be by "some
amount."
Increases called significant
Wilson says the increases will not
be significant compared to research
funding increased from other federal
sources. She noted that the National
Science Foundation (NSF) programs

and National Institute of Health
(NIH) programs rose 25 percent last
year, compared to a 16 percent defen-
se increase. NIH provides 41 percent

c3Solutions

Amo

(t

I1

S
Tmw

(EL COME
ACK
TUDENTS!!!

Doily rnoto by ANDI SCHREIBER
LSA freshmat 'isanna Gerneth, left, and Michelle Binienda stand in the
Butler Loung in Mary Markley residence hall. They are among 11
freshmen lip * in temporary rooms because of a shortage of spaces in
residence hails.
Housing crunch in
dorms easesslightly
By EVE BECKER lounges are equipped with stan-
and EUGENE PAK dard dorm furniture and are
A record number of freshmen shared by two to four women.
admitted to the University this fall Williams said the Housing Office
has forced housing officials to push was prepared to move students in
available space in residence halls with resident advisors as a last
to the limit in c:der to guarantee step, but the lounge space is suf-
freshmen housing. ficient. Last year a few students
But the crunch for dorm space is did live with R.A.s temporarily.
a little better than expected, ac The women were given T-shirts
cording to Director of Housing In- embelished with, "I wanted a
formation Leroy Williams, room but all I got was this darn tee
because of a large number of "no- shirt," on the back.
shows" and lease cancellations. LSA FRESHMAN Michelle
Two weeks ago 200 students still Binienda, who is living in a conver-
had not been assigned housing, ted lounge in Markley, said she
Williams said. These students feels comfortable in the lounge
were sent notices instructing them, because it has a lot of space.
to check in at the housing office "I don't really care. I like it.
when they arrived to receive a We'll be placed (in permanent
housing assignment. rooms) by September 12," she
BY AUGUST 30, only 11 women said. "I was really mad, but I got
were assigned temporary housing, here and it was nice."
but sufficient housing was found Two of the four students
for the men. Spaces became assigned to the Markley lounge
available because of a large num- have not moved in yet, so Binienda
ber of "no-shows," conversions of and roommate Lisanne Gerneth
double rooms to economy triples, have moved out the extra beds and
and . allowing students in taken over the extra bureaus and
traditional residence halls to can- portable wardrobe closets in the
cel their leases. room.
The dislocated students are Although the space is adequate,
living in lounges in Mary Markley, the women complained that there
Stockwell, and Bursley. The See HOUSING, Page 8
'U'.Concs work on coe
reaches virtual standstill

Complete Computer Center is Ann Arbor's
oldest and most experienced computer dealer.
Located just two blocks from campus, we offer a
full line of computer supplies, accessories,
peripherals and software. Our Service Department
and Technical Support Department are fully
equipped and trained to service all your computing
needs. Come in and see what Complete Computer
Center can do for you!! !
eMacintoshTMUpgrades
*Software at discounted prices

J.RIGGINGS*
"Our FAMOUS Backroom Clearance Sale"
Shorts ..... $3.97 & up Pants......$6.97 & up
Shirts.....$6.97 & up Suits.....$19.97 & up
Briarwood Mall - AnnArbor, MI 48104 . 313/663-3106

*Full line of Supplies
and Accessories
*Authorized AppleTM
Service Center

Authorized Dealer

*1985 Apple Computer, Inc. Apple and the Apple logo are registered trademarks of Apple Computer.
Inc. Macintosh is a trademark of McIntosh Laboratory, Inc. and is being used with its expiespermissawn.

Ani
oi

An nigthree ki d
f eyeglass Ienst
ode kin d of pride.
a W
TBAFOCAL
tas~SBIFLENSES
to 30sj*41

nds
at

Complete

a
'

HT,. X-I -l0

r
"F

Hours; 9-6 Mon.-Wed. & Fri.
12-8 Thurs., 10-5 Sat.
Free on-site parking C
Financing Available
413 EAST HURON-ANN ARBOR, MI 48104
313/994-6344.OUTSDE SALES STAFF: 994-6404

,q% oop

W Ve are pleased to announce the following graduates of the University of Michigan
Business School have recently become associated with our Firm.

This is one kind of price that means a savings of up to $40. Right now
selected bifocal, trifocal and all single vision clear plastic eyeglass lenses are
$44.95 when you purchase a frame from our selection of hundreds of styles

And here are two low prices on contact lenses
Clear Daily Wear Coacts11 Clear Extended Wear Contacts1
These low prices also include eye exam. trial wearing plan and follow-up visits.

I

Offer good at participating offices only Some restrictions apply. Not valid on state or federally funded
programs.
The science of better vision.
The art oflooking good.
Briarwood Mall " 769-5777

By REBECCA BLUMENSTEIN
and KERY MURAKAMI
The University Council has made'
virtually no progress in its version of
a code of non-academic student con-
duct this summer, making it more.
likely that the University's ad-
ministration may implement its
much-opposed version of the code this
fall.
Student leaders have opposed the
administration's code, saying it
violates civil rights. And its im-
plementation would ignore the
Michigan Student Assembly's
authority to approve any rules gover-
ning student behavior.
According to Virginia Nordby,
special assistant to University
President Harold Shapiro, the ad-
ministration will have to assess the
likelihood of the council finishing its
work in the near future. She did not
say whether this assessment has
already begun.
Administration impatient
The council has been at work for
nearly two years, but has drawn
criticism from the administration for
its lack of progress, and charges that
students on the committee are
stalling.

last fall, saying that he may ignore
Michigan Student Assembly's power
to veto, and propose the ad-
,ee 'U,' Page 18

ATLANTA OFFICE
Stephen Balengee, MBA
Consulting
Deborah Frye, MBA
Consulting
BOSTON OFFICE
Stephen Fletcher, MBA
Consulting
Jeffrey Silver, MBA
Tax,
CHICAGO OFFICE
John Anderluh, BA/ACCT
Audit
Karen Carr, BA/ACCT
Audit
Karen Falk, BA/ACCT
Tax
Jody Haber, BA/ACCT
Audit
Robert Herman, MBA
Consulting
Peter Murphy, MBA
Consulting
Carl Padding, BA/ENG
Tax
James Personius, MBA
Consulting
Hugo Vannispen, MBA
Consulting

PaulsWelch, MBA
Consulting
Christine Zamiara, BA/ACCT
Audit
CINCINNATI OFFICE
Jeffrey Smudski, BA/ACCT
Consulting
DENVER OFFICE
John Stukel, BA/ACCT
Audit
DETROIT OFFICE
Alfred Cambridge, III BA/CIS
Consulting
John Ewan, MBA
Consulting
Sharon Holman, BA/ACCT
Audit
Todd Hubbard, MBA
Consulting
Dawn McCloud, BA/ACCT
Audit
Michael Mead, BA/ACCT
Tax
Luke Meert, MBA
Consulting
David Micoff, BA/ACCT
Audit

Thomas Ogar, MBA
Consultin g
Donna Perry, BA/ACCT
Audit
Joseph Romzek. BA/ACCT
Audit
Cynthia Schelske, MBA
Aud(it
Catherine Schmidt, BA/ACCT
Audit
James Smith, BA/CIS
Consulting
Ken Smith. BA/ACCT
Audit
NEW YORK OFFICE
Todd Londa, BA/ACCT
Audit -
Daniel Solomon, MBA
Consulting
PHILADELPHIA OFFICE
Kenneth Larsen, BA/ACCT
Audit
SAN FRANCISCO OFFICE
James Highland, MS
Consulting
Ann Wagner. MBA
Consulting

SIZES TO FIT EVERY DORM ROOM

1

We are pleased to announce the following graduates of the University of Michigan
Public Health School have recently become associated with our Firm.

CHICAGO OFFICE
Rachael Frank, MBA
Consulting

DETROIT OFFICE
Bridget Boes, MBA
Consulting

We are pleased to announce the following graduates of the University of Michigan
Engineering School have recently become associated with our Firm.

Special GroupA
Special Group B
,IZ,9SIZES
12'x6' to 2 SIZES'. ยง

001

CHICAGO OFFICE
Brian Kim, BA/ENG
Consulting
Benjamin Yomtoob, BA/ENG
Consulting
DETROIT OFFICE
Clarke Anderson, BA/ENG
Consulting
Robert Baldwin, BA/ENG

Jeffrey Freeburg, BA/ENG
Consulting
Suzanne Gorte, BA/ENG
Consulting
Daniel Hamburger, MS/ENG
Consulting
Christopher Martin, BA/ENG
Consulting
Patricia Nawrot, BA/CS

Michael Sovel, BA/ENG
LOS ANGELES OFFICE
Gary Antonick, BA/ENG
Consulting
NEW YORK OFFICE
Paul Daugherty, BA/ENG

I - -

I

I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan