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October 03, 1986 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-03

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, October 3, 1986- Page 5
Imagainary 'sweetheart' inspired fraternity song

ALBION, MICH (AP)-She will ho
was the coolest coed, the frat's alums
meow, a mythic queen of the compos(
campus. and F.:
She supposedly inspired two them to
Sigma Chi brothers to pen perhaps in 1911
the most famous fraternity theme, A B
tapping out the tune on an Albion membE
College organ 75 years ago. "sweet]
BUT "The Sweetheart of Sigma chapter
Chi" may not have been a real attend
woman. She may not have even culmin
been a woman. "Sweet
"The author once said that the halftim
'sweetheart' was the fraternity football
itself," said Kim Strable, alumni The
director at Albion. "That kind of Stokes
burst the bubbles of some gals who mark
thought it was written for them." chapter
Albion College on Saturday other c
Reagan veto
(Continued from Page 1) bans n
intended to bring pressure to bear bank lc
to convince the Pretoria It al
government to dismantle its the Uni
apartheid system of racial steel,
separation. agricul
AS A First step, the legislation ammu

nor the song written by
Byron Stokes, who
ed the words during class,
Dudleigh Vernor, who put
omusic later that same day
OUT 200 fraternity
ers and a dozen
hearts" elected by the
r through the years are to
a series of gala events,
hating with a mass
theart" serenade at
ne of the homecoming
I game.
song had been composed by
and Vernor merely to
the local Sigma Chi
r's 25th anniversary. But
hapters nationwide began

clamoring for copies of the
swooning love tune, and it soon
was adopted by the national
fraternity.
"A lot of guys like to sing it to
their sweethearts. They take it
very seriously," said William T.
Bringham Sr., executive director
of the national Sigma Chi chapter
in Evansville, Ill. "The song
prompted the selection of chapter
sweethearts, and about 30 years
ago we began electing a national
sweetheart.
A LB I ON, appropriately
enough, was the first chapter to
elect a Seetheart of Sigma Chi,
Marjorie Hossfield of the class of
1946. She's now Marjorie Sliger,
a grandmother from Northville.

"The song brings back a lot of
warm memories," she said. "I-
was dating a Sigma Chi. In fact, I
think I was engaged to him.
"But I really can't remember
how I was selected."
Despite Vernor's contention
that the song was about the
fraternity, Strable said there
always has been dispute over the
inspiration. Vernor and Stokes:
both died in 1974.
"I'VE read that he (Stokes)
didn't have a particular girl in
mind, but wrote about what her
thought a Sigma sweetheart
should be," Erich Lines, a current
Sigma Chi member at Albion,
said Thursday.

fails
new investment an
oans.
so bars the importati
[ted States of South
iron, coal, ura
tural products, food
nition and mi

on S. African sanctions
d new vehicles. And it 'transfers the rights for South African aircraft
South African sugar quota to the and terminates the air services
ion into Philipinnes. agreement now in effect between

African
nium,
, arms,
litary

The measure puts an end to
direct air transportation between
South Africa and the United
States, abrogates U.S. landing

the two countries. Certain exports
to South Afric also are now
banned, including petroleum
products, nuclear material and
data and certain computers.

'U' Council debates protest

Associated Press'
Zaccaro indicted
John Zaccaro, left, walks through lower Manhattan with his wife, former
vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro, on Monday. Zaccaro has
been indicted following an investigation of birbery in the awarding of
'' cable television cont,-acts.

(Continued from Page 1)
consensus of action, the council
released a discussion draft of the
emergency procedures last April.
Student members of the council
don't feel that such pressure is
fair. "It's unrealistic for the
council to work under any
specific time frame or with any
specific requirement," said

Weine.
The council has been using the
Civil Liberties Board's
investigation of last October's
protest as a guide for its present
discussion of protest. The board
concluded that muchnmore should
have been done by the
administration and police to
uphold the rights of protesters.

/MUMEEEUUUUUUUMU COUPON UUUUUUUUEUUUUU
F F ., with this entire ad $1.00 off any adult evening
" U "M" admission, including Tues. - good thru 10/9/86 *
BLUE DAILY '
BLUE TWILIGHTK
VELVET SHOWS KARATE KID I
Call for show times

f

Pursell: All spending must be cut
(Continued from Page1) TOM BUTTS, the University's Baker, a graduate student in
osed the Gramm-Rudman act. financial aid lobbyist in economics, needs a strong student
kTe said, "It doesn't give Congress Washington, D.C., said that, turnout in his favor to have a
adequate discretion to make overall, Pursell has been "very chance for victory the November
budget decisions, particularly in supportive" of student financial election against the heavily
financial aid." Martin would not aid programs in general, despite favored Pursell. Baker argues
comment specifically on Pur- his support for the Gramm- cnat what he considers Pursell's
sell's record. Rudman act. turn to the right on a variety of
issues will cause voters to support
his candidacy. Baker agrees with
Butts, but said that Pursell "has
been supportive of student aid.

(

(

(

(Continued from Page 1)
s
and asked that the shanty be
allowed to stand indefinitely.
Johnson agreed.
Since then the shack has been
d'stroyed four times and dam-
aged on several occasions, but
FSACC members rebuilt it each
time.
"SOME STUDENTS think that
if we don't look at the pain of the
world, it will go away," Ransby
raid. "And it would be less
pinful for wealthy, white U of M
students, but not for the people who
are suffering under fascism in
South Africa."
The shanty parallels the
situation in South Africa on two
levels, said Anthony Vivasis, an
FSACC member. Physically, the
Diag shanty resembles those in
which South African blacks must
live. Made of discarded and
Wartially-burned boards, it has no
heat and no electricity.

Symbolically, the shanty is a
reminder of racism, according to
Vivasis. "Every time it is torn
down, it seems to people on
campus that racism is winning,"
he said.
At the dedication FSACC
members vowed to resume their
effort to win black South African
leader Nelson Mandela an
honorary degree from the
University. Last year's drive was
thwarted by the discovery of a
Regents' bylaw which requires
the recipient's attendance at the
ceremony.
Mandela, however, cannot
receive a degree this April either,
according to Roselle Wilson,
Johnson's assistant. A study
committee formed last year to
review the bylaws, but its
recommendations will not be
available in time to influence the
decision of this year's honorary
degree committee.

until the last few years, when he
has voted for budgets which cut
student loans."
Pursell contends that students
are concerned primarily with the
economy and their "future job
potential." He predicts that these
concerns will lead to a strong
Republican turnout in November.

mll

I-
*-
- 9/
"K.F
IJar
OKSOFF

R

AND WIN $3000.
The 1987 Honeywell Futurist Awards Competition
Here's your chance to stop us in our tracks: Power-up your imagination and make a 25-year leap into
the future. Turn your visions into two short essays, and you could win one of ten $3000 prizes plus a
Honeywell summer internship. Call toll-free 800-328-5111 (ext. 1581) for an entry form and
complete rules. Or write: Honeywell Futurist Awards Competition, MN12-4164 Honeywell
Plaza, Minneapolis.MN 55408. We'll even send you a pair of future socks for
practice. But don't drag your feet-you must request your entry form before
December 31,1986; and mail your entry by January 31,1987

s
.
Y
r
! r
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STogether, we can find the answers.
Honeywell

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