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October 02, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-02

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, October 2, 1986 -Page 3

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'Up in the air Daily Photo by CHRIS wG
In what has become a common sight in recent weeks, umbrellas filled the Diag yesterday, due to continuing
rains.
Rains, floods plaguue Midwest
By The Asoiated Press Montana. and southern Missouri got 5
More rain fell yesterday h One man died yesterday when inches. Heavy rain also fell in
gross the Midwest and Plains, his car was swept off a bridge in Indiana and Ohio. The National
hiere flooding has left more than Oklahoma, and another was Weather Service reported three-
500 people homeless, and missing and presumed dead in day totals of up to 15 inches in
klahoma's National Guard was Illinois. One person died last parts of northeastern Oklahoma,
ked to help in one county where week in Montana. nearly half the usual annual
sme people are cut off and One Kansas man spent the precipitation.
"apped." might in a tree after his car was The earthern portion of a dam
A partially ruptured dam in washed away. on Lawrence, Lake near
Tisconsin remained standing Flood-ravaged northeastern Westfield, Wis., was washed'
ut leaking, and hundreds were Illinois got gentle rain yesterday,, away Tuesday and 200 to 300
elieved still away from their but 2 to 3 inches fell during the people were evacuated from the
tmes in flooded northeastern morning in hard-hit Oklahoma, town of about 1,000 people.

Lucas outlines plans
for reforming welfare
L ucas: No more free Iunc lies

.ti

By STEPHEN GREGORY
Republican gubernatorial
candidate William Lucas
yesterday outlined his plans for
reforming the state's welfare
system, saying that, if elected, he
would give every welfare
recipient either an education or
job training to get them off
welfare.I
"There will be no more free
lunches for the employable," he
said.
LUCAS also alleged Gov.
James Blanchard is purposely
doing nothing to get Michigan
residents off welfare, a move
which he feels is politically
expedient for Blanchard.
"When you keep people
dependent on you, you maintain a
significant amount of influence
over them," Lucas said in a
prepared statement.
"Under Blanchard, welfare
has become a permanent trap.. .
Paternalistic policies have made
it economically unwise to get off
and stay off welfare. Recipients
just can't afford to take an entry-
level job."
ACCORDING to Lucas, most

welfare recipients should be
working because they are able to
hold down a job.
"There is no excuse for
allowing 14,000 people, most of
them who are single, able-bodied
adults, to receive this payment.
Under my administration, they
will go to school or they will go to
work, and in two years they will
be off welfare," Lucas said.
A spokesman for Blanchard,
however, said Michigan
currently has the lowest number
of people on welfare in six years.
Steve Weiss said that from March
1983 to August 1986, over 230,000
people have gotten off welfare.
LUCAS said if he is elected,
"welfare will become a temporary
way-station on the road to
something better." lie said that he
would fund a mandatory
education and job training
program.
Lucas attacked the Blanchard
administration's "Project Self-
Reliance" because he says job
training and education are not
requirements for welfare
recipients, and it "has a terrible
record of placing individuals in

real jobs, and it costs the
taxpayers of Michigan $4,480 per
placement."
Weiss said, however, that there
are provisions in Project Self-
Reliance that require welfare
recipients to sign up for training.
He said Lucas must be
misinformed.
LUCAS also challenged the
Youth Corps, a program that
creates public service jobs for 18-
to 20-year-old welfare recipients,
saying it creates too many "dead-
end, non-challenging
government 'make work' jobs."
Weiss also disputed this. He
said that more than two-thirds of
the Youth Corps members have
either found full-time jobs or
attended vocational school after
their public service jobs had
ended.
The Blanchard
administration is offering state
businesses six months of
financial assistance if they agree
to hire welfare recipients and
train them, Weiss added.

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Fords blast U.S. auto industry

E Q udBy LAURA BISCILOF"
:University officials are
keeping quiet about a criminal
case against a former East Quad
employee that was dismissed last
Wmonth.
East Quad Building Director
Deba Patnaik, Ruth Addis and
;John Heidke of Housing, and
Armnando Lopez of personnel all
declined to comment on the case.
DISTRICT court records
indicate that Rina Nydahl, who,,
worked at the East Quad: front

f i cials quif
desk, was arrested in July on
charges of embezzlement
(through falsifying time cards)
and false pretenses, but the case
was dismissed at the preliminary
hearing on Sept. 3.
Assistant prosecuting attorney
David Lady said, "The
University of Michigan agreed to
accept restitution in lieu of
prosecution." Nydahl, who
reported'ly left the state, agreed to
pay back the estimated $4,600,
according to Lady.

on case

Lady said he thought Nydahl
had paid most of it back already.
NEWS of the case came as a
shock to East Quad staff
members. "I didn't believe it
when I first heard about it," said
one resident fellow who did not
want to be identified. "I was
shocked to hear this because I
always felt that Rina was a very
honest and trustworthy person,"
she said., She added that she heard
about the case through the
grapevine,,

DETROIT (AP)-Former Ford
Motor Co. Chairman Henry Ford
II says U.S. automakers
contributed to their recent
financial problems by taking
their success for granted.
But Edsel Ford II, Ford's son,
predicted that Detroit would
remain the center of the world's
auto industry in the long run.
The Fords made their com-
ments in a rare joint public
appearance yesterday during the
75th anniversary dinner of the
Detroit section of the Society of
Automotive Engineers.
"Our industry's foot-dragging
on safety and emissions concerns
swung open the door for
government regulation of our
industry," the elder Ford said.
"But we can't blame government
for all of our problems. We really
had lost our way through much of

that period. We were so suc-
cessful for a long time following
World War II that we took our
home market for granted.
"We began to believe our own
propaganda that we had all the
answers .. .that all we had to do to
win was show up for the game," he
said. "We forgot how much any
challenger wants to knock off the
champ."
Edsel Ford II, often referring to
his father as "Daddy," said U.S.
automakers would continue to be
the industry's world leaders.
Although he said high tech-
nology was changing the U.S.
auto industry, it primarily was
being revived by a renewed
commitment to quality and a
fresh approach to leadership that
emphasizes teamwork rather

than hierarchy and authority,
said the younger Ford, an
executive with Ford's Lincoln
Mercury division.
GO LUE
rom All Of Us At
ASOLA STYLISTS

OPPOSITE .JACOBSONS
668-9329

MAAPLE VILLAGE
761-2733

WEEKEND,
MAGAZINE
Fridays in The Daily
763-0379

I

Taco Bob's leaves,
replaced by chain

Campus Cinema
'McCabe And Mrs. Miller
(Robert Altman, 1971), CG, 7 &
9:15 p.m., Aud A.
Warren Beatty is a second-rate
gambler and Julie Christie is an
opium-tokin' prostitute in this
gritty look at the Old West.
Modern Times (Charles Chaplin,
1936), MTF, 7:45 p.m., Mich.
See Charlie Chaplin get wired on
coke and go absolutely hog-wild in
his last silent film!
Performances
1705 - Soundstage, 9:30 p.m.,
U-Club.
The U-Club will rock when
this pop-rock band hits the
stage.
-Arts at Midday - Michigan
-Union Arts Program, 12:15
p.m., Pendleton -Room,
Michigan Union.
Ted Wyman will play Bach's
"Well-Tempered Clavier" on
the piano.
Peter '?vadcat" Ruth Concert-
Iyladcat, The Ark, (761-1451).
Guitarist/singer Spencer
Bohren will accompany.
Meetings
Hebrew Speaking Club - 4
pam, 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Study Abroad 101, Part 4:
Credit Transfer for Non U-M
Study Abroad Programs -
International Center, noon,
Lecture Rm. 1, MLB.
Women's Okinawan Karate
&'Self-Defense Club - 7:15
p~m., Martial Arts Rm., IM
Sports Bldg.
University Alchoholics Anon-
ymj~ous - noon, 3200 Union.
United Farm Workers Support
Group Mass Meeting - 6:30

p.m., East Conference Room,
Rackh am.
Roger M inear - "The Role of
Humic Substances in Aquatic
Chemisty," Chemistry Depart-
ment, 4 p.m., Room 1200,
Chemistry Bldg.
T. Leith-'"Wall Street - The
Real World," Investment Club,
4:15 p.m., Michigan Room,
Assembly Hall Bldg, Business
Administration.
R. Kozma -"Preparing and
Using Microcomputer-Based
Tutorials," 7 p.m., Room 3001,
School of Education Bldg.
H. Cooper - "Moving Beyond
Meta-Analysis: Knowledge
and Synthesis Activities in
Education & Psychology,"
Program in Education &
Psychology, 4 p.m., Tribute
Room, School of Education.
M. Osawa - "Occupational
Transformation: Japan & the
United States," Japanese
Studies, noon, Commons
Room, Lane Hall.
P. Berry - "Lipstick on the
Rim: Reflections on the
Aesthetics of Japanese
Ceramics," School of Art, 7
p.m., Art & Architecture
Auditorium.
L. Valdes - "Isolation of
Biologically Active Diterpenes
from Salvia Divinorum,"
Interdepartment Program in
Medical Chemistry, 4 p.m.,
Room 3354, C.C. Little.
Dean Baker- Michigan Econ -
omic Society Meeting, 5 p.m.,
Lorch Auditorium.
"The Job Search" - Career
Planning & Placement
Lecture, 4:10 p.m., 429 Mason
Hall.
Furthermore

By DOV COHEN
Taco Bob's is dead.
The epitaph was written on a
cardboard pizza platter that stood
in' its window yesterday
morning. It read: "Sorry, but
that's all folks! Taco Bob's is no
more. Thanx for your patronage,
ya' all."
IT WAS two years old. Taco
Bob's opened in October 1984,
according to Bob Cranson, owner
of Pizza Bob's and, until last
December, part owner of Taco
Bob's.
One mourner lamented:
"That's a drag. I loved their
chocalate shakes. Bob makes the
best shakes ...Taco Bob' s is an
institution."
Taco Bob's owner, Garth
Jackson, said, "There really isn't
any comment. The place fell on
bad times"
THE BUILDING at 8105S. State

Street, home of the Taco Bob's, was
also the former dwelling of Pizza
Bob's Uptown and Tijuana Bob's.
Taco Bob's - belqved deliverer
of late-night tacos, nachos, and
tostadas - will be replaced by Mr.
Spot's.
The new store will specialize
in Philadelphia steak
sandwiches, buffalo-style
chicken wings, and hoagies, say
its new owners.
MR. SPOT'S is owned by three
twenty-three-year-old Bowling
Green State University
graduates. Friends of theirs
opened the first Mr. Spot's in
Bowling Green and have been
very successful.
"The future is so bright, we
have to wear shades," said Steve
Strobel, manager of the new store.
Spot's hopes to be open for
business in two to three weeks,
said owner Keith McKendry.

................. .... *................ .. ...............
The English Composition
" ~ ACADEMIC WRITING SERIESX%
"OVERCOMING WRITER' S
2...BLOCK"
~' z Do you have trouble sitting
,., ~ down to begin an essay? When:.
you finally do begin, do you '"
-N have, nothing to write? Are
XXX Mp you unable to fill a page? ::
."; ;. Francelia Clark and Emily Jessup
":.:"of the English Composition
Board examine the anxieties
of the blank page and offer
""" techniques for overcoming
writer's block.
- -THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2
:;:" 4:00 -5:15
229 Angell Hall
.:
................. ...~**... . ......................
LONDON
I NTERNSHIPS
" Art/Architecture
" Business/Economics
" Engineering
" Human/Health Services
" Journalism/Communications
" Performing Arts
* Politics
All programmes include: 16 semester hour credits, 10-eek
internship, apartment; British faculty. Offered fall. sprlig and

Kresge
recieved
(Continued from Page 1)

funds

for

theater

according to Dr. Harold Moss.
program officer at the foundation.
EACH year the Troy-based
Kresge Foundation grants money
worldwide. The money is a
"challenge grant," in which the
foundation pledges money to a

group if it can reach a certain
funding goal.
"We are very pleased with all
the community support. We urge
the community to come take a
look, and maybe they will wish to
contribute to the project," Hewett
said.

i
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( i

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