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October 01, 1986 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-10-01

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Page 5- The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, October 1, 1986

MSA dismisses two
reps, another resigns

By WENDY SHARP
Two Michigan Student
Assembly representatives were
kicked off the assembly last night
because of their poor attendance
record, and one representative
resigned due to other time
commitments.
Brian Burt, a Rackham
Student Government rep-
resentative, and Brian Drabik, a
fifth year College of Pharmacy
representative, violated the
assembly's constitution by
missing 12 consecutive roll calls
at six MSA meetings, so they were
formally dismissed.
BURT IS in Germany and not
a University student this year,
according to Gus Teschke,
another RSG representative.
Drabik said he attended two
assembly meetings since he was
elected, but cannot commit the
time to attend meetings. "It's a
combination of a lot of things, but
mostly schoolwork," Drabik said.

RSG representative Thea Lee
officially resigned from the
assembly due to other time
commitments. Lee is working on
graduate student Dean Baker's

final decision on the
nominations.
Bruce Belcher, chair of Rules
and Elections Committee, said it
is not unusual for representatives

Associated Press

Puddle popper
Fifteen-year-old Scott Garcia of Saginaw creates a totally awesome fan as he skids his bike through a 25-foot
puddle.

'The attendance is about the same this year.
We're just watching it more closely now.'
-Bruce Belcher
Rules and Elections chair
campaign to unseat to leave the assembly during the
Congressman Carl Pursell. first few meetings. "The
Replacement procedures attendance is about the same this
require that RSG and the College year. We're just watching it
of Pharmacy nominate Students more closely now," he said.
to the assembly. MSA makes the
THERE'S STILL TIME TO PREPARE
CLASSES STARTING
IN OCTOBER
203 E. Hoover 662-3149
.CALL DAYS, EVENINGS & WEEKENDS
EDUCATONAL CENTER LTD.
TEST PREPARAION SPECIALISTS SINCE 1938

Blood and Gore

Study says
PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Rock videos,
under fire for their blood, gore and slow-
motion mayhem, have yet to rival the
violence on prime-time television,
according to a study published by the
University of Pennsylvania's School of
Communications.
"Nothing is as violent as prime-time
TV," said George Gerbner, dean of the
Anneberg School of' Communications,
-'which published the report.
"I ThINK the concernsabout rock videos
have been exaggerated. There does not
seem to be a scientific reason for focusing
ion music videos per se."
The researchers stopped far short of
endorsing music videos, however. They
said their analysis of 42 hours of videos led
to the conclusion that they are violent, male-
oriented and laden with sexual content -
criticisms voiced by feminists and the
National Coalition on Television Violence.
About 75 percent of all prime-time shows
'contain violence, compared with 56 percent
of all "concept videos," which dramatize the
,music, according to the study's authors,
Barry L. Sherman and Joseph R. Dominick
of the School of Journalism and Mass
Communication at the University of
eorgia.

videos less violent than TV

THE STUDY covered the 1985-86 prime-
time season. Gerbner said this week he
wouldn't discuss the new TV season
because, he said, impressions usually are
misleading.
'Violence is the cheapest,
most active thing going. Not
that it's popular- it's cheap
to produce.'
-George Gerber
Journal of Communications
editor
The study found that music videos don't
have as much sex as prime-time televison
-1.4 sexual episodes per minute versus 1.6
on prime time - but the sex is more graphic.
However, most of the sexual involvement
consisted of non-intimate touching, such as
handshaking.
"It's well-charged, with a lot of sexual
implications," Gerbner said.
SEX IN videos has a distinctively
adolescent slant that is "long on titillation
and physical activity but devoid of

emotional involvement," the researchers
said. "Violence is the cheapest, most active
thing going. Not that it's popular - it's
cheap to produce."
Videos on the MTV network and on such
shows as "Friday Night Videos" and "Night
Tracks" rely less on action and more on the
performers and their music," he said.
The researchers found several key
differences between videos, which
aredirected at teen-agers and young adults,
and conventional TV, which is aimed at 25-
to 49-year-old consumers:
Women in videos are more likely to be
aggressors than victims, often appearing as
"predatory females."
On conventional television, non-whites
are more apt to be victims than aggressors.
In videos, non-whites are equally likely to
be either.
On televison, children, teen-agers and
adults all get abused. In videos, older
adults, especially mother figures, are the
predominant aggressors. The young are
regularly persecuted on video by their
"establishment elders" and also by their
non-white peers.
to the
ce and
denied I
ge and
pt. 16 he
icholas
Moscow Normandie Flowers
2for 1Carnations
* WITH THIS COUPON
(Good until 10/8/86) I
one customer per week
ssion is 1104 S. University
ome of 996-1811
posal to
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Zakharov pleads no contes
(ContinuedfromPage1) when the 39 year-old Zakharov affairs officer assigned
was arrested on a subway U.N.'s Center for Scien
The no-contest plea means he platform as he allegedly tried to Technology. He c
neither pleaded guilty nor pay an FBI informant $1,000 for involvement in espiona
nnocent to the charges. U.S. classified documents on military told a news conference Sep
Attorney Andrew Maloney jet engines. The informant said had been set up by the FBI.
outlined the terms of the plea he was recruited by Zakharov in American journalist N
agreement. 1983. Daniloff was arrested in
The spy case began Aug. 23, Zakharov is a scientific a week after Zakharov.

and Student Comedians
JIM RHOADES
and
JON WEINSTEIN

Greeks face housing crunch

(Continued from Page 1)
"OUR PROBLEM is with frat
behavior, which in my opinion is
a direct, result of overuse of
alcohol," says Susan Hughes, who
lives two doors down from Sigma
:Alpha Mu and across the street
"from Sigma Chi. "The Sigma
Chis are really good neighbors;
P they are thoroughly thoughtful
with their parties."
The Sigma Alpha Mus are a
different story, according to
Hughes. "What I really don't
like is that they allow the minors
to drink, especially hundreds of
high school kids that come to their
parties and then relieve
themselves on our lawn."
"They just don't care," she
says-.
"I see it as a situation that is
much more out of hand than last
fall. There's no control. The
Sammies asked us to call if we
had a problem with the noise, and
when we did we got a very, very
obscene reply," says Hughes. "At
3:30 in the morning when you can
hear the words to a song in bed
clearly enough to sing along, it's
too loud!"
THE FRATERNITIES are not
the only Greeks having trouble
housing their members.
Sororities are finding it
increasingly difficult to cut
through neighborhood concerns
and the red tape of the Zoning
Commission.
"I think the sororities have a
reater problem with housing
"than the fraternities, because
there .are a lot more fraternities
I .and I don't think they see the

campus."
Sororities also experience
trouble with neighbors. "It's a
long, hard battle," Seiler says.
"The city council people and city
planning commission are under
a lot of pressure from neighbors. I
would think that people would
want group housing that .would
provide nice, safe, clean housing
at a cheap price."
"THE PROBLEM is just
finding a house in Ann Arbor that
will house a fraternity or a
sorority," says Omid Osanloo,
president of the Kappa Delta Rho
fraternity, which is currently on
Catherine Street, far from the
other Greek houses.
The Kappa Delta Rho house
had trouble with the residents of
the old Fourth Ward area when
house members moved in last
year. The residents were afraid
their neighborhood would become
saturated with other Greek
houses.
The IFC had intended that the
Rho house remain there, in hopes
that other Greeks with housing
problems might follow suit. "It is
a great location," said Osanloo,
"except it really hurts our rush.
We had to go to the dorms and
pick people up."
After a battle of their own, the
Alpha XiDeltassorority has
purchased a house. "When we
moved.in we changed occupancy.
It was owned by the University,"
explains House Manager Diane
Werner. "When we moved in we
got stung with every rule in the
book."
Xx~t".1 TTI

"The Task Force Commi
working on resolving s
these problems."
One problem is a pro
make it illegal to bui

as. r V. FrKUNI\ ERSITY
Sunday, Mon" ,aY Saturday C LUB
UNIVERSITY ACTIVITIES CENTE-A I
2105 MICHIGAN UNION u
ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN 46104 O, m,smI.~~a ~
763-1107- - - - ' - -

Greek houses in the area bounded
by Lincoln and Olivia streets.
Existing houses would be given
senior priority and could remain
there.
"EVERYBODY'S got an
opinion," Clark says. "Ten years
ago there was a decline in the
Greek system and neighbors were
worried about boarded up old
houses. Now there's just not
enough room. Neighbors worry
about acquiring new frats. It goes
in cycles."
As for solving the problems that
arise from housing disputes, "We
are looking at moderate changes,
rather than wholesale changes,
which is what the neighbors
want," says Clark. "I think we're
going to be busy for a long time."
No one faces cancer alone.
Call us.
AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

ja
Reserve a Micro!
What? Three hours of uninterrupted work.

BLOOM COUNTY
I OH A10,.
~0

Where?
When?

400 N. Ingalls Bldg., Rm. 4438.
Mon.-Fri., 8:00am-5:00pm.

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