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September 29, 1986 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-29

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cl

Nete yt t
Ninety-seven years of editorial freedom

IaiI3

!oI. XCVII - No. 18

Copyright 1986, The Michigan Daily

Ann Arbor, Michigan - Monday, September 29, 1986

Ten Pages

Swallowing

hard,
wins ai
By MARK BOROWSKY
Wolverine fans who expected a
main course of Air Wolverine
last Saturday against Florida
State left hungry.
For those who ordered from the
ususal Michigan menu, i.e.
running and defense,
Michigan's 20-18 Homecoming
victory over the Seminoles was
just their bill of fare.
MICHIGAN running backs
served up 213 yards on 49 carries,
while controlling the ball 36
minutes to the Seminoles' 24.
Furthermore, the maligned
Wolverine defense allowed a
total of 285 yards. Fattening
indeed, but 100 yards under their
two game average of 387. The
defense also had one fumble
recovery and three interceptions,
two by Ivan Hicks, which is more
than gravy. Such play makes
Michigan head coach Bo
Schembechler want second
helpings.
"The most pleasing victory
we've had this year,"
Schembechler said after
Michigan had cooked up its third
victory against no defeats. "I'm
not saying we're a great team or
anything like that, but I feel good
about our ballclub..
"BETTER THAN I have after
the previous two games."
Michigan quarterback Jim
Harbaugh added food for thought.
, "Coach Schembechler said to us
s yesterday that we'll find out
d where this team's at," Harbaugh

M'

igain
said. "It gives us a lot of
confidence beating one of the best
teams in the country."
IT IS easier for Michigan to
feel better, as its first two victories
over Notre Dame and Oregon
State were rather hard to digest.
But in front of 105,507 at Michigan
Stadium, the Wolverines made
the Seminoles (now 1-2-1) look
like an appetizer before the main
meal - the Big Ten season which
starts next week at Wisconsin.
The opposition won't feast
much with the running of Jamie
Morris. The junior tailback ran
for 99 yards on 19 carries.
Gerald White added 37 yards
on 10 carries. One went for a
first-quarter. touchdown that gave
theWolverines an early 7-0 lead.
Although Morris didn't play
most of the fourth quarter due to a
bruised knee, his replacement,
Thomas Wilcher, ran for 54
yards on nine carries (all in the
fourth quarter), including a
seven-yard touchdown scoot with
1:27 remaining in the game to put
the Wolverines ahead, 20-10, and
the icing on the cake.
INSTEAD of replacing Morris
with White at tailback,
Schembchler opted for a fresh pair
of legs in the fourth quarter.
"Wilcher came in and sparked
us," Schembechler said of the 5-10,
188 pound running back. "He's a
strong, hard-running kid."
"I thought Wilcher was a good
move for them," concurred
See~BLUE, Page 9

Bogus cheerleader
Business school senior Tom Pezzetti is lead away by officers Saturday
during the Michigan vs. Florida State football game. A cheerleader from
Florida State told officers that her uniform had been stolen from her hotel
room, and she pointed out Pezzetti in the crowd, according to Capt.

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY

Donald Carnahan of the Ann Arbor Police Department. Pezzetti was
released pending investigation, but he may face charges of larceny from
a building. The maximum penalty is up to five years imprisonment.

F

i

'U,

to discuss

By STEVE KNOPPER
A Committee formed last week to review the
University's policy of granting honorary
degrees may discuss discontinuing honorary
degrees altogether, according to a memo
committee members received from University
President Harold Shapiro.
The first meeting date of the new committee
has not been determined, according to John
. D'Arms, committee chairman and Dean of
Rackham Graduate School, but he is currently
"trying to get it established."
D'ARMS said the committee should be
"prepared to consider a number of options,
from a reaffirmation of current policy to
discontinuing the honorary degree policy."
The honorary degree review committee was
created due to controversy last April when

jailed South A
was not consi
University c
honorary degre
degree due to
Mandela was
life sentence.
LSA senior
review comm:
honorary deg
alternative,"
people" to Ann
HE SAID,h
"a lot of thing
going into the
Kraus woul
requiring ho
person to be be

African leader Nelson Mandela go so far with the Mandela degree (last April),
dered for an honorary degree. then run into the policy," He said. Krau.
officials said recipients of denounced the "bureaucracy" which blocke
ees must be present to obtain the the University from granting Mandela the
of a Board of Regents bylaw. degree.
jailed in 1962, and is serving a Students and faculty protesteded the bylaw
and many later gave- Mandela a degree o
Joseph Kraus, a member of the their own in a ceremony on the Diag before las
ittee, said getting rid of the year's commencement ceremonies.
trees would be "an unsavory THE REVIEW committee's purpose
because it brought "exciting according to Shapiro's memo, will be "tc
Arbor. conduct a careful and comprehensive
however, the committee will have examination of the objectives, policies, an<
s to discuss" and that he is not procedures surrounding the awarding of
meetings with a set agenda. honorary degrees at The University of
d have liked the regental bylaw Michigan and to offer recommendations
norees to receive degrees in concerning future University policy anc
tter publicized. "It was a shame to See 'U', Page 5

V
F
fI
5t

Christian militiamen
defeat former chief

BEIRUT, Lebanon (AP)-
Christian militia hardliners
crushed a comeback attempt by an
ousted, pro-Syrian commander
yesterday in 24 hours of street
battles in Christian east Beirut,

.People' s Food Co-op
offers unusual food

By JYOTSNA
SREENIVASAN
Where can you find four
different kinds of brown rice,
whole-grain noodles flavored
with spinach and tomatoes,
*sesame butter, and more herbs
and spices than you've ever heard
of- all in bulk? Try one of the
two stores of the People's Food
Cooperative.
"A co-operative is a member-
owned or worker-owned
business," explains Kirsten
Jensen, member services director
of the People's Food Co-op. The co-
op started in 1971 as a small store
on State Street carrying "about
eight products," according to
Jensen. By 1975 the store was so
successful it moved to a larger
building on Packard Street and
opened a second store on Fourth
Avenue.
JENSEN CALLS the People's.
Food Co-op a "new-wave" co-op.
"It started as a continuation of the
radicalism of the late '60s, when
people didn't trust big
establishments and wanted to
take things into their own hands,"

she said. A co-op's purpose is to
serve the people, not to make a
profit, Jensen added.
The People's Food Co-op is a
retail store which buys from
several main suppliers,
including a warehouse called the
Michigan Federation of Food
Cooperatives.
"We try to support local
growers," says Jensen, "and we
try to focus on 'clean' foods-
things that don't contain
preservatives pesticides, and
artificial ingredients." In
addition to bulk food, the stores
also carry produce, dairy
products, and time-saving mixes
of natural foods.
WHILE ANYONE can shop at.
the co-op, members are entitled to
a discount on food and a vote in
electing the board of directors and
establishing policies.
Over the summer the co-op
changed its method of
membership from an annual $10
fee to a $60 lifetime, refundable
deposit. Members automatically
get a 5 percent discount, but if they
See CO-OP, Page 5

which police said killed 62 people
and wounded 198.
Fighting began at dawn
Saturday when about 600
supporters of Elie Hobeika,
former commander of the
Lebanese Forces Christian
militia, stormed across the Green
Line dividing east Beirut from
the Moslem western sector.
"The last pocket of resistance
was mopped up at daybreak, when
12 infiltrators from Elie
Hobeika's supporters
surrendered," said a
communique issued by the
Lebanese Forces, the nation's
largest Christian militia.
POLICE confirmed that
loyalists of Lebanese Forces
commander Samir Geagea
defeated the pro-Hobeika
attackers.
There was no word on the
whereabouts of Hobeika, who was
ousted from the command of the
Lebanese Forces by Geagea's
hardliners Jan. 15 for signing a
Syrian-sponsored peace pact with
Moslem militia leaders.
President Amin Gemayel,
himself a Maronite Catholic, was
among the Christians who felt the
accord's power-sharing
provisions conceded too much to
the Moslems.
ONE report yesterday, not
confirmed, said Hobeika was in
Chtaura, the Bekaa Valley town
which houses command
headquarters of 25,000 Syrian
troops stationed in Lebanon under
a 1976 peacekeeping mandate
from the Arab League.
The collapse of Hobeika's
See BEIRUT, Page 5

Building dedicatepdDaily Photo by SCOTT UTUCHY
University President Harold Shapiro (standing at podium) speaks at Friday's dedication of the new Electrical
Engineering and Computer Science Building on North Campus. The $30 million classroom and laboratory
building opened this term and is part of the College of Engineering's move to North Campus, expected to be
completed Winter Term.

TODAY
Go home, Ron

appearance. Eighteen percent said they were
more likely to vote for Lucas after Reagan'sj
visit, 33 percent said they weren't swayed
either way, and 10 percent said they were.
unsure. The poll also showed that Blanchard'
was maintaining a 2-1 margin over Lucas.:
I-**~ ."1+.. 1.. .~ 4r ... ,. ..a..Ata./t r c a hP

concern about the increasing amounts of illegal
garlic flooding the market, President Suharto
ordered the destruction of smuggled garlic.
Indonesia produces aboput 53,00 tons of garlic a year
and consumes about 63,000 tons annually, according
to government officials. The government fears the

-INSIDE-
PIRGIM: Opinion calls on the Board of Regents
to recognize the student's voice. See Page 4.

I

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