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September 26, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-26

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 26, 1986 -Page 3
Bracelets weave friends, trends

By ELIZABETH ATKINS
"Friendship bracelets," thin,
thick, and every imaginable
combination of colors, are a hot
trend on campus this fall. The
decorative creations adorn
students' wrists and ankles,
symbolizing friendship or
trendiness.
The bracelets seem to be just a
trend, but Nancy Elias of Orchid
Lane, a State Street shop
specializing in South American
clothing and goods, says they're
often worn for a more "powerful"
reason.
"A LOT of people now wear
them to show American support
for Central American people, "
she said. Elias , who has lived
and studied in South America,
said Guatemalan children make
and sell the bracelets.
The bracelets probably
originated in remote areasof
South America, Elias said. She
said an isolated culture in the
jungle of Peru on the Amazon
River was discovered in the late
1940s in which the men made the
bracelets and wore them for
decoration.
Others claim the bracelets
mark the wearer as a "dead-
head," a follower of the Grateful
Dead rock group. An anonymous
East Quad resident said she could
only find a dark-colored bracelet
she had been looking for at a
Grateful Dead concert. She said
she likes the group's music, but
would not call herself a "dead-
head."
LSA FRESHMAN Marybeth
Reavis calls the bracelets
"friendship bracelets." She said
&tt31 U09

friends in high school taught her
how to make them using
embroidery floss, so now she
makes them herself. They're
made like macrame, she said,
while other students reported
making them from telephone
wire.
Reavis said friends who
exchange the bracelets make a
wish and tie them onto their
wrists with a knot. When the
bracelets break or fall off, Reavis
said, the wish is supposed to come
true.
Wearing five pastel-colored
bracelets on her wrist and two
more on her ankle, LSA

freshman Jennifer Meyer
admitted the bracelets are simply
a fad, but said it's special to her
when a friend puts the time and
energy into giving her one.
Many students, saying they
are just following the trend,
sported the colorful bracelets for
no particular reason.
Others are skeptical of the
trend. Engineering sophomores'
Steve Woroniecki and Corey,
Erickson agreed wrist bracelets
are "alright," but that ankle
bracelets are strictly for strange
people on the beach.

r

m

Tuesday Lunch Lectures
CURRENT WORLD ISSUES: AN UPDATE
12 Noon '
At The
International Center - 603 E. Madison St.
September 30: "Israel and the Palestinians"
Speaker: DR. ANTHONY SULLIVAN, Director, Near East Support Services

Sponsored by the.
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER

Don't
Forget

Daily Photo by JAE KIM

Bible reading 101
.Waving a Bible, "Preacher Mike" lectures to students lounging on the grad
haven for voicing moral messages.

steps. ' tie Diag is his afternoon

,,,

'T-bear bi
By LYNNE CHAPMAN
Julie Lightenon, LSA
(sophomore, innocently strolled
,dwn the Mosher-Jordan halls
l'uesday wearing a ruffled floral
flannel nightgown and a pink
-bow in her hair. She carried a
ather whip and a teddy bear.
heryl Williamson, engineering
sophomore, was at her heels
equipped with cookies and milk.
)The two women then went to
,tuck in the men of third Jordan.'
The students were
:participating in a "tuck-in"
;organized by their resident
advisers as a way to meet-new
people. The women of fourth
osher's end and wing brought
everything from popcorn and
.coolers to whips and stuffed frogs
to entertain the men, who reported
,that they slept well that evening.
,To determine their "tuckees," the
women had picked names at
random from sign-up sheets
posted i-the bathrooms.
Upon arriving at third end and

" "
r igade tucks In MoJo0
wing, around 11:30 p.m., the sported sunglasses and held a
women were greeted with dim beer can. "This is an experience
lights, soft music - including that may change my political
George Winston and 'Pillow views," joked Vostal with a big
Talk'- the scent of Polo cologne, grin.
and smiling young men clad in
robes. Nursing sophomores Cheryl
Lightenon greeted LSA junior Drongowski and Laura Stuckey
John Simms, a resident adviser, treated engineering freshman
by snapping her whip, saying Jeff Jakubowicz and his
"John, it's bedtime," and roommates to, milk, cookies,
ordering the wide-eyed student to "awesome" backrubs, and
get into his loft. Simms complied. bedtime stories.
Once in the room, Lightenon
and Williamson lent Simms It was an interesting night for
their teddy bears, fed him cookies everyone involved. According to
and milk, and talked for several Resident Adviser Kristine Yu,
minutes. Simms later said, "It "Everyone was eager and
hurt so good." cooperative. And everyone agreed
In another room, Julie Brown, that it was a unique and good way
LSA sophomore and her partner, to meet new people."
LSA fres man Nora
McLaughlin, tucked in LSA Th of Jordan's third d
freshmen Pat Vostal and Dave Te menoend
Pinelli. The room was dark as and wing vowed to return the
the couples sat on the floor favor next week by serenading
relaxing with Mrs. Peabody's the women of fourth Mosher's end
Cookies and J&B Coolers, while a and wing with a song written by
teddy bear wired to the stereo freshman Rich Freysinger.

CANTERBURY HOUSE
ESPISCOPAL CHURCH AT U-M
218 N. Division St.
Services daily, 5 p.m.; Midnight (exc.
Saturday).
All Are Welcome
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.-662-4466
(between Hill and S. University St.)
William Hillegonds, Senior Minister
Sunday Worship Services at 9:30 and
11:00 a.m.
Church School, including nurseries at
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Sunday Bible Study 11:00 a.m.
Wednesday Communion Service
7:00 p.m.
* * *
AMERICAN BAPTIST
CAMPUS CENTER
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Huron St. (between State & Division)
Sundays: 9:55 Worship, 11:25 Bible
Study groups for both Undergrads
and Graduate Students..
Wednesday: 5:30 Supper (free) and
Fellowship.
CENTER OPEN EACH DAY
for information call 663-9376
ROBERT B. WALLACE, PASTOR

NEED MONEY?
WORK FOR
HOUSING!
Jobs with Housing Division's
Food Service offer
$4 .2O/hr. starting wages
FLEXIBLE HOURS
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
Phone or stop by the Food Service
Office of any Hall.
Alice Lloyd ..... 764-1183
Bursley ....... .763-1121
East Quad..... .764-0136
Couzens Hall ... 764-2142
Law Quad..... .764-1115
Mosher Jordan . 763-9946

,Storms cause mental, dental distress

t _ ..

s

From The Associated Press
'Thunderstorms continued
their wet onslaught on Michigan
yesterday, this time picking on
th southwest part of the state.
Van Buren County received
more than five inches of rain,
washing out several roads, while
other areas of southern Michigan
received one to four inches of
ain, officials at the National
Weather Service in Ann Arbor
said.
ONE PERSON died and five
were injured in the storm,
'authorities said. It also knocked
ut power to about 2,500 electricity
customers, officials said.
Central Michigan and the
Saginaw River basin, devastated
vw6 weeks ago by what some have
a'Rd Michigan's worst flood in
;nodern history, received about an
inch of rain yesterday, too little to
cause more flooding, said Gary
Clihrson, a hydrologist with the.
weather service.
But the future doesn't look
fright.
THUNDERSTORMS accom-
panied by heavy rain-possibly
Ws -much as five inches in some
areas-were expected to invade
:the Lower Peninsula today and
:tomorrow, Charson said.
-'They could cause more
:flY'&ing, but nothing like what
occurred two weeks ago, he said.
:All rivers were receding
yesterday except for the Saginaw
at Saginaw and the Geand at
Ionie.
Tanspat ei
(Continued from Page 1)
;apparently denied a heart
:,transplant because available
infant hearts are rare and
:officials at a California hospital
'believed her unmarried parents
:cold not provide adequate care
r the child. Only after the
41.. . 1 1- 1

Michigan's two weeks of rain
have done more than flood
basements, wash out roads, and
drown farm crops. The weather
also put some people in a blue funk
and sent others to the dentist.
THE DREARY days that have
been a daily occurrence since
high waters began pouring over
central and southern Michigan
Sept. 10 can contribute to de-
pression in many people, au-
thorities said.
Some people also have been
grinding their teeth over the
dreadful weather, and that's
costing them a lot in dental bills,
dentists say.
Bob Rankin, a psychology
professor at Central Michigan
University in Mount Pleasant,
said a study he completed about
five years ago showed moods
changed with the weather.
"WE DID find there was a
fairly clear difference," Rankin
said. "People experienced a little
more unhappiness and sour
moods" when it was cloudy.
"A certain percentage (of
people) are weather sensitive, and
they are more likely to experience
depression" when it rains, he
said.
Recent studies have supported
the notion that some people suffer
from a lack of sunshine and
become depressed during long
stretches of gloomy days, said
Frederick Gault, a psychology
professor at Western Michigan
Univrsity in Kalamazoo.
"KEEPING someone indoors is
duesexplored
when someone dies, a
professional with appropriate
training must approach family
members with a formal request
for organ donation," he said.
"Currently, family members are
frequently not approached with
such requests." Caplan said

I

going to add to the stress factor,"
Gault said, adding that parents
with children are especially at
danger.
Meanwhile, three Saginaw
dentists said they have had an
unusual number of patients with
chipped or loosened teeth, broken
dentures, and lost fillings since
the rains started pushing area
rivers to record levels.
Dr. Leonard Sarosi said he has
treated five patients this week
with chipped teeth and lost
fillings, more than double his
normal caseload.
"They're all worried. Their
house is on the line," he said.

k

Markley Hall
south Quad
Stockwell . .

L ... 764-1151
... 764-0169

764-1194

. .. .

West Quad . .

..764-1111

MONO

.I

Jaan
exclud es
Amnerican
suppliers
WASHINGTON (AP)-Cozy
ties between Japanese carmakers
and their traditional suppliers
are keeping American auto parts
companies out of Japan and
threatening jobs in the United
States, a Senate subcommittee was
told yesterday.
Bruce Smart, U.S. commerce
undersecretary for international
trade, testified that unlike other
areas of trade where U.S. access
to Japan's markets is limited by
governmental barriers, the
problem in auto parts stems from
private agreements between
Japanese manufacturers and
suppliers.
"They don't really consider
qualified competitors from
outside that tight family circle,"
Smart told the Senate sub-
committee on employment and
productivity.

The English Composition
Board Announces .
ACADEMIC
WRITING SERIES

k4 4
i
"4

The Academic Writing Series is a series of active work-
shops designed especially for undergraduates; the sessions
will explore and explain some of the problems, forms, fea-
tures, and demands of writing required at the University.
Overcoming Writer's Block
Thursday, 2 October 4:00-5:15
Francelia Clark, Emily Jessup
ECB Lecturers
Writing An In-Class Mid-Term Essay Exam
Thursday, 16 October 4:00-5:15
Michael Marx
ECB Lecturer
Everything You Always Wanted to Know About
Grammar, Punctuation and Mechanics*
*But Didn't Know Whom to Ask
A Round Table Forum
Thursday, 30 October 4:00-5:15
Robert Carlisle, Michael Marx, Ele McKenna,
and Barbara Morris
ECB Lecturers
Documentation for the Research Paper
Thursday, 13 November 4:00-5:15
Helen Isaacson
ECB Lecturer

I I

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