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September 22, 1986 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Flood victims

(AP)-Governor James
Blanchard labeled Michigan's
recent flooding as the worst
natural disaster in the state's
modern history, but residents
whose homes were inundated and
farmers whose crops were ruined
have vowed to rebuild.
Residents of the 22 central
Michigan counties swamped by up
to 13 inches of torrential rain that
pushed several rivers to record
levels have begun to clean up
from their once-in-a-lifetime
event.
"ABSOLUTELY, without a
doubt," it was the worst disaster
Midland County history, said
Mike Freer, director of the
county's Emergency Services.
"I'm confident I will never see
anything like this again in my
lifetime."

The four-day storm that started
with tornadoes and lightning
Sept. 10 and caused flooding
along a strip from Lake
Michigan to Lake Huron rang up
some big numbers: More than
$323 million in damage to
private, public and agricultural
property; six deaths; two people
presumed drowned; 89 injured;
4,000 people evacuated; eight
broken dams; 150 National
Guard troopers called to duty.
President Ronald Reagan
declared the 22 counties disaster
areas, making homeowners,
business owners, and farmers
eligible for federal grants and
low-interest loans.
EIGHTEEN d i s a s t e r
application centers are scheduled
to open Wednesday to accept
claims from the tens of thousands

itruggle
of people expected to seek federal
assistance, said Julie Phillips, a
spokeswoman for the state police
Emergency Management
Division.
She said more than 10,000
people already have contacted
state or local officials about
obtaining aid, and at least $228
million of the total damage will be
reimbursed through federal
assistance.
"But we can't replace
everything they lost," Phillips
said. "No one is going to be made
whole. You won't get 100 percent
back."
LESS than six percent of the
damages was covered by
insurance, she said.

to rebu
Local and state officials said
people living in the areas ravaged
by the high waters now are
considering flood insurance and
moving to higher ground.
But on Friday, most people
were thinking only about
cleaning up the mess created by
the flood and getting back to a
normal life. That could take
awhile.
"WE'RE saying at least two
weeks before all the people are
even back in their homes,"
Phillips said. "Cleanup could
take months. It's going to take a
long time."
In Vassar, a small town in the
Thumb that was one of the
communities hit hardest by the

The Michigan Daily - Monday, September 22, 1986 - Page 5
lid in Michigan
flood, scores of volunteers were from his hardware store. "People
picking up garbage and debris are just coming from all over to
and pumping out basements give us a hand."

Friday, village spokeswoman
Marcia Warner said.
About 350 of the town's 900
homes and half of its 80
businesses were damaged
severely during the storm,
Warner said.
BUT people have vowed to
rebuild.
"It's going to be a long process,"
said Bob Atkins, standing by a
few items he was able to salvage

GRATIOT County sustained
$59 million damage, including
$15 to agricultural land and $30
million in public land-all three
highest among the 22 counties,
Freer said.
On the west side of the state,
more than 500 homes along the
Muskegon River south of
Newaygo were damaged severely.

,Aquino tours old U.S.

ha nts and
NEW YORK (AP)-Philippine
President Corazon Aquino
returned yesterday to her alma
mater after visiting the suburban
Boston house she shared with her
husband before he returned to the
Philippines and was
assassinated.
Mrs. Aquino was taken to the
College of Mount St. Vincent,
from which she graduated in 1953,
and was awarded the school's
highest honor, the Elizabeth Seton
Medal.
She and her former classmates
met for about 20 minutes, posing
for a class photo and discussing
children, careers, and school
memories, including her
'Freshman
Connection'
paves way
for students
Due to a foul-up on The Daily's
"new-and-improved" computer
system, an unedited story
appeared in Friday's paper. We
are reprinting the article below as
it should have appeared.
By MITZI LAWRENCE
Many freshmen may think
their Orientation to the University
consists only of three frenzied
days in the summer highlighted
by 8 a.m. placement tests, but the
Michigan Freshman Connection
helps orient new students
throughout their first year.
The organization, created last
year by the University's Student
Organization and Development
Genter(SDOC), tries to help
freshmen get used to the
University without being
overwhelmed by its size.
THE FRESHMAN Connection
is designed to be a social,
educational, and campus
connection for newly-admitted
freshmen. The group
concentrates on developing
leadership and communication
skills so members will be ready to
participate in other campus
organizations.
Freshmen organize all the
group's activities, although the
SDOC provided support in getting
the Freshman Connection off the
ground.
The founders of the
organization see it as an ongoing
orientation process to the
University.
"THE GROUP is a student
organization that functions, to
address the needs and concerns of
freshmen," said LSA senior
Dave Watters, the group's student
advisor.,
Freshmen are often faced with
confusing situations-even the
relatively simple task of
registering for classes can cause
plenty of headaches-but the
Freshman Connection tries to
make it easier to deal with those
situations.

Residential College sophomore
Anne Hoogart, who was last
year's Publicity Director, said her
experience was positive. "I
thought it was a great leadership
* experience. but that seemed to be a

home
performances of Filipino dances
on the same stage from which she
spoke yesterday.
She said that when her
husband, Benigno "Ninoy"
Aquino was jailed in 1972 by
President Ferdinand Marcos, she
recalled what she was told when
one of her college classmates died
during their junior year: "Thy
will be done."
"Perhaps no less than the
sacrifice of a man was needed to
give freedom to a people," she said
at a Mass at St. Ignatius Roman
Catholic Church in Newton,
Mass., where she and her slain
husband worshipped during his
self-imposed exile.

Cornerstone
Come Celebrate With- Us!
Sunday Worship Service- lOam
Angell Elementary School
(1608 S. University -1 block east of Washtenaw)
Come Learn With Us!
Tuesday Night- 7pm
Angell Elementary School
Worship and in depth Bilblical teaching
Come Fellowship With Us!
Thursday Night Home Groups- 7pm
Small fellowship groups
designed to meet personal needs

- Aerobic Dance
" Ballroom Dance
" Bartending
" Beer Appreciation
" CPR
" Entertainment
Tonight
" FInancial
Planning
" Massage
" MacIntosh Magic

- Pool
* Sign Language
" Speed Reading
" Study Skills
" Vegetarian
Cooking
* Winetasting
" Your Colorful
Image
" Yoga
" Yoga Philosophy

Pastor Mike Caulk

971-9150

Registration begins Monday, September 22
and runs through September 26 at the
Michigan Union Ticket Office.
763-1107 _

Students Dedicated to Knowing
and Communicating Jesus Christ

STUDENTS INTERESTED
* in the University's*
JUNIOR YEAR ABROAD PROGRAM *
AT THE *
UNIVERSITY OF ST. ANDREWS
SCOTLAND,
. *
* '*--. ..
. are invited to meet DR. CHRIS CAREY,
* ~ AMERICAN ENROLLMENT ADVISOR, UNIVERSITY *
* OF ST. ANDREWS, ON TUESDAY, SEPT. 23,*
*P -
* ~Please Contact The Center for Western European Studies for Details, 764-431 1 *
REGISTRA R'S BULLETIN BOA RD
With this edition the Registrar will periodically publish important
information and key dates affecting students.
DATES TO REMEMBER
Last Day to:

NEED MONEY?
WORK FOR
HOUSING!
Jobs with Housing Division's
Food Service offer
$4.20/hr. starting wages
FLEXIBLE HOURS
NO EXPERIENCE NECESSARY
Phone or stop by the Food Service
Office of any Hall.
Alice Lloyd ..... 764-1183
Bursley ........763-1121
East Quad..... .764-0136
Couzens Hall ... 764-2142
Law Quad..... .764-1115
P. ' . V ..._/f0%% A

WED., SEPT. 24
WED., OCT. 15
Beginning
THURS., SEPT. 25

WITHDRAW FROM FALL TERM - with payment of the $50
disenroliment fee and $20 registration fee.
DROP CLASSES - with a reduction in tuition and no 'W'
grade or $10 change of election fee.
WITHDRAW FROM FALL TERM - with payment of half
tuition and $20 registration fee.

WITHDRAWING FROM FALL TERM - pay full tuition and

fees assessed.
$10 CHANGE OF ELECTION FEE - payable in advance, at
the Cashier's Office for drops, adds or modifications to Fall
term schedule.
'W' GRADES - assigned for courses dropped for all units
except College of Engineering.
SPECIAL NOTICES - Effective October 1, 1986, charges for the
following services are:

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