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September 19, 1986 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-19

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, September 19, 1986 - Page 3

- I

Football and alcohol still mix

By LISA GREEN
Beer and football. For many
students, they create unforgettable
fall Saturdays. But for the
University Athletic Department,
they may lead to serious security
problems tomorrow when
Michigan takes on Oregon State.
According to Assistant Athletic
Director Will Perry, the problem
of alcohol-related rowdiness and
bottle-throwing has inspired
football security to continue its
recent "crackdown" against
alcohol use at the games.
"The rule is you can't drink on
University property, and we're
here to enforce that," Perry said.
He conceded, however, that "there
are obvious limitations- you just
can't search 100,000 people."
INCLUDED in the anti-
alchohol campaign has been a
reduction in the size of beverage
containers or coolers allowed into
the stadium, and the enclosure of
flyers with season tickets
describing the University's
prohibition of alcohol in the
stadium. For the last two seasons
these regulations have been
printed on every ticket.
But Nuel Smock, the gate
superintendent who supervises the
160 ticket-takers responsible for
checking fans for alcohol, said
the rules are "difficult to enforce."
"I try to gear them (the ticket
takers) to do what's written. The
law says you're not allowed to
search the containers or coolers,
but on the other hand the
university rule says, 'no alcohol,
period.' So if it's visible at the gate,
we confiscate it.
"THAT'S THE best we can

do," Smock said, adding that
"people can hide all sorts of things
in their coats, and besides a lot of
them are pretty well greased before
they even enter the stadium."
Bud Stein, who supervises the
stadium ushers, was more
optimistic.
"This is my 53rd year working
at the U of M football games, and
in my opinion the problem with
alcohol has steadily gone down
over the years. People are just
getting more sensible," Stein
said.
STEIN and Smock agreed that
the brunt of the alcohol problem at
football games lies with the
students.
"Mainly the difficulty is in the
student section. It's not the season
ticket holders who cause the
problem," Stein said. Smock
reiterated this point, saying that
"During the first couple of games
of the season it's the 18 or 19 year-
old students who are in school for
the first time. Maybe they're in a
frat or they're trying to keep up
with their peers, so they drink a lot
and get rowdy. After a couple of
episodes of that, it generally cools
down," Smock said.
LSA freshman Bob Henry has
heard about this phenomenon.
Henry said he plans to attend the
game tomorrow and that he also
intends to bring alcohol.
"I've heard that they're
cracking down on alcohol use on
campus- it's stricter in the
dorms, so I'm sure that'll carry
over into the games," Henry said,
adding that "I'll probably bring
hard liquor because it's easier to
hide."

Helmut Osorio, an LSA junior
said that, he has never had a
problem with security while
bringing alcohol into the
stadium.
"We usually take apple cider
spiked with alcohol to the games.
Cans of beer hidden in jackets are
also pretty easy to get in," he said.
Osorio said he thinks the
prohibition of alcohol in the
stadium actually,"makes you
want to take in more because it's
against the rule."
LSA senior Lisa Hurd said she
"didn't even know (alchohol) was
against the rules." "I don't think

drinking at the games is a
problem as long as people don't get
carried away and let it get in the
way of other people trying to watch
the game and have fun," she said.
Geoff Garver, a third year Law
School student said he has "never
had any trouble getting a six-pack
of beer into the game."
"Beer and football just go hand
in hand," he said.
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-I

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By ANDREW KAPLAN
IRISPing, a necessary yet
o4en feared tradition at the
University, may be made easier
tls fall by the addition of a new
CRISP system on North Campus.
The North Campus CRISP is
open to all University students
wo want to drop or add classes.
It main purpose, however, is to
make CRISPing more convenient
students attending North
ampus classes.
THE NEW CRISP opened
September 2 for drop/add. And
beginning in December, students
in the schools of engineering, art
arjd architecture, urban
plgnding, "and music, and the
e gineering college will be
required to CRISP there.
;According to Douglas Woolley,
University's associate
Sistrar, students who attend
North Campus classes will be told
to IRISP at the new location when
th y receive their Student
Veification Forms this winter.
$Students who have used the new
CRISP were relieved to find there
were no lines. Parag Mody, an
engineering junior, said, "Two
w4eks ago there was a two hour
ire for drop/add at Central
74mpus so I went to North Campus
ar*l it took five minutes for me to
drip/add." He also said he will
beglad to go to the new CRISP next
semester "because now I don't
have to wait in line with all those
LSA people."
*SEVERAL students attending
North Campus classes said they
vlcome the new CRISP because
Sits, convenience. But
ocalS suppo
(Continued from Page 1)
;Caulk's husband Mike said
Robertson "has a lot more support
than people realize." He said he
upports the Reverend because he
Reresents a return to traditional
famnily values and the attitude
th'at "God is not a dirty word."
ACCORDING to LSA senior
Lit Swanberg, a member of U of
M. Students for Pat Robertson,
little support exists for Robertson
on campus. The group, associated
with the local Cornerstone
Clurch, set up tables on the Diag
*id in the Fishbowl last week to
solicit signatures.
Swanberg did not know how
many signatures of support for
Robertson the group collected, but
she did say she was pleased with
the minimal support expressed by
students.
' Robertson supporters ac-
knowledge he would have to
overcome certain obstacles to win
I& ace for the presidency, but they

engineering sophomore Joy
Meyers said, "It's too far to go
since I live here on Central
campus. I think its easier if I just
wait to drop/add after the lines
disappear."
According to Woolley, the new
CRISP location cost between
$18,000 and $20,000. He said most
of the money was donated by the
schools and colleges on North
Campus while the rest came from
the Office of the Vice-President
for Academic Affairs.
"CRISP, " Woolley said, "was
created in the seventieswwith the
idea that one day it would be
decentralized. We needed a
volume of students up there to
make the cost (of operation)
feasible. We now have 8500
students in total up north, which is
a fourth of the student body."
He said that the new location
was first tried last January when
the four North Campus schools
used it to drop/add. According to
the new CRISP Supervisor Mira
Mitra, the first week was busy
with more than 530 students
dropping and adding, but the
traffic has since slowed. Mitra
attributes the recent low turnout to
poor publicity. "I wonder if they
don't know or if they've just been
too busy attending classes," she
said.
Students can also CRISP at
some academic departments. At
the chemistry department, for
example, students may drop/add
for specific chemistry classes.
The new North Campus CRISP
center is open weekdays from 9:00
to11:45and12:30 to4:15.
rt Robertson
George Bush. She predicted that
Bush would lose because he has too
often "shown his loyalty to his
special interest groups."
ALTHOUGH Crandall said
Robertson has no allegience to
special interest groups, he does
feel that Robertson would have to
allay common fears that he will
establish a state religion if
elected. "He is opposed (to this),"
Crandall said. "He'll show' in
the coming year that's not in his
plan."
Other supporters pointed to
Robertson's showing in last
summer's Rebublican State
Convention as evidence of his
appeal. At that convention,
Robertson supporters made up 53
percent of Republican delegates.
Missy Caulk feels since
Robertson won Michigan, which
she considers a fairly liberal
state, he should have no trouble
winning more support in the
Sunbelt.

CROSS & RESURRECTION
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Welcomes students to worship with us this Sunday.
We meet in Cleary College on
Washtenaw at 9:00 a.m.
RIDES ARE AVAILABLE
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SEPTEMBER 25, 1986

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--- - -- -- -

MUSICIANS WANTED
TO PLAY AT SOUNDSTAGE
THURSDAYS IN THE U-CLUB
rock/jazz/blues/reggae
ALL TYPES OF BANDS and/or SOLOISTS WELCOME
AUDITIONS Sept. 21- 23
Call 763-1107 for info and audition time

JO STENS
A ME R IC A S C OL L E G E R iNG
Stop by and see a Jostens representative
this week to save on the gold ring of your choice.
Monday September 15th-Friday September 19th, 11a.m. to 4p.m.

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