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September 15, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-15

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The Michigan Daily- Monday, September 15, 1986 - Page 3

Reagan
WASHINGTON (AP) -
President Reagan joined by his
wife, Nancy, in appealing for a
a"great new, national crusade,"
pledged aggresive government
action against drug abuse
yesterday but said the key to its
success will be the courage of
individual Americans.
"I will announce tommorow a
series of new proposals for a drug-
.
a
4

wants national a

free America," the president said
in a joint address with the first
lady from their living room in the
White House.
Reagan said the proposals
would bring federal spending on
combatting illegal drugs to $3
billion.
"AS MUCH financing as we
commit, however, we would be
fooling ourselves if we thought

that massive new amounts of
money alone will provide the
solution" he said in the prepared
text of his speech.
"Your government will
continue to act agressively, but
nothing would be more effective
than for Americans simply to quit
using illegal drugs," the
president said.
"I'm mindful that drugs are a

ction against
constant temptation for asked.
millions," Reagan said. "Please The speech clima
remember this when your courage focus by both the a
is tested: you are Americans. No and Congress on
one ever has the right to destroy menace.
your dreams and shatter your THE PRESIDEN
life." proposals to Congre
MRS. REAGAN spoke House has alreadyp
especially of the effect of drugs on abuse bill, "will toug
young people, saying, "For the against drug
sake of our children, I implore encourage more r
each of you to be unyielding and treatment and insu
inflexible in your opposition to drugs will not be to]
drugs." schools or in our wo
"Won't you join us in this But, he added, "Le
great new national crusade?" she that in America,;
problems and n

xe
Id
n
N7
ass
pa
gh
re,
ire
lei
irk
et i
no

drug abuse
crusade has ever succeeded
d a week of without human investment.
ministration Winning the crusade against
the drug drugs will not achieved by just
throwing money at the problem."
T said his "What an insult it will be to what
S, where the we are and whence we came if we
ssed a drug do not rise up together in defiance
en our laws against this cancer of drugs."
criminals, Reagan began the joint
search and address with introductory
that illegal remarks in which he said, "Drugs
rated in our are menacing our society...
k places." They're killing our children."
us not forget Of drug dealers, Mrs. Reagan
eople solve said, "For every door we close,
national they open a new door to death."

- ......... ......... -l--Z=

1!9 1

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's Annual
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, September 21, 1986
3 p.m. - 6 p.m.
AACT Building - 338 S. Main St.

MN I

AA

"

All are invited to Ann Arbor Civic Theatre's Annual OPEN HOUSE to
discover the creative opportunities that abound in the various areas that
combine to create "another opening, another show." The Ann Arbor Civic
Theatre is a theatre dedicated to the community, in the truest sense - A
THEATRE FOR YOU. AACT is a non-profit organization
comprised of all volunteer-members from the community.

THIS
THE
UNIVERSITY
ACTIVITIES
CENTER

w

So come and share with us as a new season
begins. Refreshments will be provided. For
further information call 662-7282, Mon. - Fri.
between 1 p.m and 4 p.m.

99

L4JX

'W

ANN ARBOR'S OWN
COMEDY THEATER TROUPE

Daily Photo by CHRIS TWIGG
(foreground) and junior Paul Thomas stock their cart during a recent

LSA senior Mitch Rudnick,
"Krogering" spree.

Students stake out markets

By EDWARD KLEINE
Food. If you live in a dormitory it's easy to find.
Just go to any University cafeteria, present the
checker with your meal card, and eat away. No
hassle at all.
Students living off-campus, however, have a
tougher time finding their next meal. Some solve
the problem of eating by buying residence hall meal
plans, ranging from $100 to $1,554. Others eat all
their meals in restaurants. But most go
"Krogering," a clever advertising slogan that has
become the generic term for grocery shopping.,
LSA junior Adam Hakim and his friends, LSA
Junior Adam Moskowitz and Wayne Cohen, a
business school junior, shop at Kroger's on South
Industrial once a week.
Mostly, Hakim said, they buy food they can cook
themselves and rotate cooking duties for the four or
five hot meals they eat each week. Lunch is usually
"grab what you can," and breakfast is "either
skipped or just a banana," he said.
HAKIM said last year he lived in a house and ate
out every day. This year, by going to the
supermarket, Hakim figures he saves around $60 a
week and also eats better. "Roy Rogers and
McDonald's just don't cut it ," he said.
But for some students, buying groceries doesn't
mean they're eating well. LSA Junior Dina Pienta
said she and roommate Christine Townsend, an
engineering junior, live on Dannon vanilla
yogurt, Koepplinger's bread, Grape Nuts cereal,
brown eggs, .and wheat pilaf, with a calcium
supplement of soft ice cream from McDonald's.
When shopping for food, students prize
convenience. Between classes, studying, or a job,

most students don't have the time to prepare a sit-
down meal, so easily prepared foods usually beat out
nutrition for a place onthe dinner table.
Rackham graduate student Sue Havstad said she
and her roommate
mostly buy foods they can microwave and
"whatever you can eat real fast."
MORE fastidious is Rackham graduate student
Stuart Kaufman, who sits down for breakfast every
morning and cooks dinner each evening. "It takes
more time", he said, "but, then, I like to cook."
"Krogering" is the way many describe shopping,
but not everybody shops at Krogers grocery store.
Some do their shopping at Meijer's, which has a
larger selection as well as clothing, pet supplies, and
home furnishings.
Others, such as LSA Sophomore Cherie
Morganroth, found shopping at White Market on
East Liberty, go to smaller grocery stores closer to
campus because they don't have transportation.
Do the advantages of buying and cooking one's
own food outweigh the hassles, such as time and
money spent shopping and cooking?
"A dormitory's easier," said Engineering
freshman Steve Smith, who lives off-campus but
visited friends in dorms last year. "But in the
apartment, the food's better. It's just more difficult.
You have to do it yourself."
Some, though, remain partial to cafeteria food
long after they've left the dorms.
"I loved dorm food," Townsend said. "I'd walk
all the way across campus for beef pot pie."
But can student cooked meals beat the ultimate
standard: home cooking?
"No way," one student declared. "Mom make
good food."

COLLEGE BOWL
COMEDY COMPANY
DEBATE
HOMECOMING
IMPACT JAZZ DANCE
LAUGHTRACK
MEDIATRICS
MICHIGRAS
MINI COURSES
MUSKET
SOPH SHOW
SOUNDSTAGE
SPECIAL EVENTS
STARBOUND
TECH CREW
TICKET CENTRAL
VIEWPOINT LECTURES
UAC Mass Meeting

MassMeeting
MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 15
8:30 P.M.
MICHIGAN UNION
BALLROOM
ACTORS, WRITERS,
TECHNICAL & PRODUCTION
ASSISTANTS NEEDED '

J
-

Mon. Sept.15

7p.m.

Michigan Union Ballroom
call: 763-1107

for more info, call 763-1107

ml

L

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6
{
K
R
t
M
6
k
i
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i
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Cafeteria may violate health laws
(Continued from Page 1)

Juniors,Seniors &Grads...
YE YOURSELF
IME CREDIT'l

reached the areas where workers
were standing, according to the
employee. She said Reviere told
the employees not to speak about
what had happened.

Reviere refused to comment
about the incident.
Barry Johnson of the
Washtenaw Health Department
said that if food service employees

T

I

What's happening
around Ann Arbor

Campus1

Cinema

Blow-Up (Michelangelo
Antonioni,1966), CG, 7:00 & 9:05
p.m., Aud
A.
A mod 60's fashion photographer
gets caught up in a murder. Stars
David Hemmings and Vanessa
Redgrave.
Volcano (D. Brittain & J.
Kramer, 1977), Eye, 8:00 p.m., 214
N.4th.
The life and death of British
novelist Malcolm Lawrey, author
of Under The Volcano.
Documentary.

Meetings
Michigan Freshman Connection-
-7 p.m., Anderson Room, Union.
United Campus Against Nuclear
War (UCAM)--7 p.m., Room 3909,
Union.
Free South Africa Coordinating
Committee--8 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheater.
Michigan Daily Arts Staff-7
p.m., Student Publications Bldg.,
second floor, new writers
welcome.
Speakers

walk through sewage, it is a
public health risk.
Kevin Besey of the University
Occupational Safety and
Environmental Health Services
said that operating with sewage in
a food preparation area violates
Michigan Food Service Law act
no. 368. He added, however, that
Stockwell's food service license
would not be revoked because "one
food service matter was
mishandled."
Besey said that the University
would be prosecuted only if it was
a repeated offense, and if the
University refused to clean up or
close the cafeteria. He added that
his department would investigate
to find out what happened and
make sure that it did not happen
again.
When a sewage leak occured
in West Quad's cafeteria a few
years ago, the cafeteria was
closed immediately, according to
Besey.
Such incidents are rare and the
University generally does an
excellent job of keeping its food
service kitchens clean, according
to Ken Schaltzle of the University
Occupational Safety and
Environmental Health Services.

" Just bring a copy of
your school I.D.
" No cos igner required
APPLY NOW ON CAMPUS!I

f

- mm m ~ --- m

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