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September 10, 1986 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-09-10

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, September 10, 1986 - Page 5
by Berke Breathed

Plane air spurs danger

BLOOM COUNTY

By NAOMI WAX
"Poor air circulation in
airplanes may be life-
threatening to some people," said
Harriet Burge, a University
researcher.
"Most at risk are people with
immune systems that are
compromised, such as AIDS
sufferers and people undergoing
chemotherapy and radiation
therapy," she said.
BURGE WAS among 11
scientists on a committee of the
National Academy of Sciences
which studied air quality in
commercial airplanes.
Burge said, "Most of the
airlines were reluctant to allow
us on the planes." This was
largely owing to fear of alarming
passengers at a time when the
airlines are financially
unstable.
Burge said her panel had to
rely on documentation rather
than first hand experience. The
University had prepared a
laboratory and a procedure to
study the bacteria and mold, but
their facilities were not used.

A specialist in finding,
identifying and removing
airborne molds, bacterias and
viruses, Burge said residue from
tobacco smoke accounts for most
of the dirt buildup in airplane
cabins.
"AIR EXCHANGE rates in
airplanes are already in the
minimum level recommended
for other interiors in a
presumably smoke-free
environment," she said. "With
Pthe addition of smoke, there's
no way an aircraft can meet the
ventilation standards set by the
American Society for Heating,
Refrigeration, and Air
Conditioning Engineers."
The committee recommended
that all smoking be banned on
commercial flights.
At present there are no
ventilation standards set for
commercial airplanes.
BURGE SAID an investigation
of an influenza outbreak among
passengers on an airplane in
Alaska showed that they were kept
in an unventilated plane for four

hours.
"Seventy-two percent of the
people came down with the flu,'
she said, adding that just one
passenger had the flu at the
beginning of the flight.
The committee recommended
that existing standards for other
interiors be implemented on
airplanes.
I THE COMMITTEE also
requested that further research on
airplane ventilation be done.
They recommended that
airliner cabins be ventilated at
all times and if an airplane is
grounded for more than 30
minutes without ventilation, the
passengers should leave the
aircraft.
The committee's report was
recently given to the Federal
Aviation Administration (FAA).
The FAA will submit it to
Congress.
BURGE IS optimistic that
further research will be funded
and says University laboratories
will be used if further research is
done.

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BLOOM COUNTY

by Berke Breathed

Research on AIDS increases

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(Continued from Page 1)
modifying their sexual behavior.
Conversely, the belief that peers
were changing their behavior
influenced the participants to curb
their sexual habits.
UNIVERSITY health officials
say that research projects such as
Joseph's will pick up in popularity
in an effort to help educate the
public about the danger of AIDS.
The University Health Service
is one organization on campus that
is trying to educate students and
faculty alike about the epidemic.
Health service representatives
are available upon request to speak
to campus and faculty groups, as
well as dormitory residents. They
also distribute a brochure entitled,
"What Everyone Ought to Know
about AIDS."
MARK ERICHSON, student
service assisstant in the
Department of Health Promotion

said, "Education is a big thrust in
controlling AIDS, and we expect to
increase our programs to educate
the community about AIDS."
Osborn added, "If we are able to
communicate properly with the
community, we can control the
spread of AIDS."
Osborn has no doubt that as the
number of AIDS cases rises, which
it is expected to do, the amount of
money the government spends on
AIDS research- currently $200
million-will also rise. These
increases, Osborn said, will lead to
more research done on the subject.
SHE TINKS there is a definite
need for research in health care
because "an age group that
normally doesn't get sick is now
dying."
She also sees a need for research
on drug use and abuse because

intravenous drug use is a way to
acquire AIDS. Osborn said
researchers should examine the
psychological aspects of those with
AIDS or those who may contract the
disease.
The number diagnosed cases of
AIDS is expected to increase
drastically from 16,000 in 1986 to
74,b00 by 1991, according to a report
from a national public -health
organization. The number of
deaths is predicted to increase from
9,000 to 54,000 during that period.
"THERE DEFINATELYwill
not be a cure for AIDS in the next 10
years, but maybe we can develop
treatments in the future that can
help slow (AIDS) down. With
education, we can avoid (AIDS),
which is a much better situation
than the Plague," Osborn said.

BLOOM COUNTY

by Berke Breathed

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Local Dems. want student rep.

(Continued from Page 1)
should to be heard in Lansing. "
Although she said she is
disappointed with the results at the
state convention, she predicted the
resolution will fare better at the
next state convention in
February.
Cumberworth thinks the
resolution failed on the state level
for several reasons: the county
delegates lobbying for student
regents are inexperienced, people
at the state level knew it was
coming and did not want to deal
with it, and it is a new and
controversial idea.
BUT SHE SAID In February
the delegates will have lobbying
experience behind them and the
idea won't be so new to the state.
"If it doesn't go away people will
become aware of it and consider
its value," she said.
Asher feels that students

should be involved in the
governing processes because they
contribute to the University.
"Tuition provides 40 percent of the
revenues, and we're only asking
for one-ninth of the
representation."
Although the resolution had
considerable support within the
county, there is some county
opposition to the issue.
A MEMBER of the League of
Women Voters, who asked not to
be identified, said that the idea of
electing students as regents is a'
grave mistake. "Students
wouldn't have time to do anything
but harbor complaints," she said.
She added that their grades
would suffer because the position
is a full-time job, and therefore
they could never make the time
commitment that is demanded by

the position. And she noted,
"Students are never barred, they
already have access to the
regents." Because students can
tell regents of their concerns,
there is no need for a student
regent, the woman said.

Phone 764-0558

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Lucas proposes cost cuts

ROYAL OAK, Mich. (AP) --
Republican gubernatorial
nominee William Lucas
introduced proposals yesterday
that he said woiuld make
Michigan's unemployment
insurance and workers'
compensation systems fairer and
less costly.
The changes are necessary
because the high costs of the state
programs are forcing businesses
to leave the state, Lucas said at a
news conference.
"Michigan employers pay
close to the highest workers'
compensation and
yunemployment insurance rates
in any state in this nation," Lucas
said with the metal stamping
equipment of Hawthorne Metal
Products Co. pounding behind
him. "Now it is time to turn those
costs around.
"According to the current

he would:
-Increase unemployment
benefits only after a periodic
review by the Legislature. that
would replace the current
program that indexes and
automatically increases benefits
annually.
-Create a one-week waiting
period between the time a worker
leaves a job and the time he is
eligible for benefits. He said this
change would save Michigan
employers $40 million to $60
million and encourage workers
to find new jobs quickly.
-Allow companies to hire
summer workers who would not
be eligible for unemployment
benefits after completing their
seasonal work. Many people
come to work in the state during
the summer, and after their
seasonal job ends, they collect
unemployment benefits for the

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