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January 17, 1986 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'Action
Against
AIDS'
presents
resolution

(Continued from Page 1)
Saline).
VIRGINIA NORDBY, director of
Affirmative Action, heads the task
force with officials from personnel,
health services, and housing offices.
Although only a month old, the task
force hopes to form an effective policy
to deal with AIDS at the University.
Although Shapiro described the
University's task force as "taking;
initiative," the members of Action
Against AIDS said that such a task
force cannot meet. their concerns.
"Such a top level of management
can't deal with a problem without
more input," said Jeanette Shy, Ac-
tion Against AIDS member.
While "AIDS is definitely here in
Ann Arbor,"there is confusion over
who is fighting the battle, and from
where, according to Shy.

DESPITE the fact that Action
Against AIDS is demanding more
funding for AIDS research that it says
is "virtually non-existent" now,
University Vice Provost for Medical
Affairs George Zuidema said after the
meeeting that there is research on the
immune system being conducted at
the University. "The money allocated
at the federal level is very substan-
tial," Zuidema added.
Richard Kennedy, the University's
vice president for state relations, also
criticized Action Against AIDS's per-
ception of what is being done about
AIDS. '.'They are somewhat naive in
understanding what we are doing in
terms of education and research,"
said Kennedy.

U.S.

The Michigan Dily - Friday, January 17, 1986 -Page 5
AIDS cases rise 84%

ATLANTA (UPI) - The number of AIDS cases in the
United States jumped 84 percent in 1985, and the number
of AIDS cases linked to blood transfusions more than
tripled, federal health officials said yestery.
Along with the increase in AIDS infections, the national
Centers for Disease Control said the fatality rate from the
disease, for which there is no cure or effective treatment,
rose to 51 percent.
THE DEATH rate for AIDS victims dianosed before
July 1984 was even greater, increasing to 79 percent. The
CDC said 59 percent of the children who have AIDS die of
the infection.
Cases of AIDS related to blood transfusions increased
from 56 in 1984 to 171 last year, despite the implementaton
of a blood screening program that identifies those infected
with the AIDS virus.

The CDC said the impact of the blood screening
program and deferral of those at increased risk probably
weren't reflected in national AIDS reporting because of
the long period between infection with the virus and
development of the disease.
"We would hope to see a decrease in the next two to
three years," CDC said.
The incubation period for the disease can be as long as
seven years. the CDC said, and "the possibility of longer
incubation periods cannot be excluded."
Since June 1, 1981, there have been 16,458 AIDS cases
reported to the CDC, including 16,227 adults and 231
children. Of those, 8,361 have died.
"The number of cases reported each six-month period
continues to increase, although not exponentially, as
evidenced by the lengthening case-doublingInes," the
CDC said.

JU' Council continues work
on code, decides on jury

Dance Theatre Studio

(Continued from Page 1)
view code was ready to replace the,
University's current rules. Ad-
Wninistrators have said the current
rules are largely ineffective.
X'I DON'T feel close enough to the
day-to-day operations of the Univer-
sity to make that sort of judgement,"
she said. "I'd respect the recommen-
dations of the president."
Regent Thomas Roach (D-Saline)
agreed with Varner.
However, there is no guarantee that
the council's draft will be approved by
the regents.
REGENT Deane Baker (R-Ann Ar-
bor) objected to the council's plan to
leave much of the rule making for
non-violent actions up to the in-
dividual units of the University.
According to the council's plan, it
would set general guidelines by mid-
May and allow the various branches
of the University to set specific rules.
One such guideline "would probably
Sbe the right to due process," said
Prof. Ann Hartman, a member of the
council.
The council would also set rules
which pertain to "generic" non-
violent crimes - those which apply to
more than one unit of the University,
such as theft.
'BAKER SAID the council agreed to
draft an entire code and anything less
would mean "abdicating their
agreement." He refused to comment,
however, on what action he might
take.
Later yesterday, the University
Council continued to work on their
emergency procedures. So far, coun-
cilmembers have agreed that once a
violent crime, including arson, has
been committed, a faculty member or
adminstrator serving as the
University's central coordinator
would take some action.
For example, the coordinator might
* bar a student from a classroom. The
sanction, however, would be the
minimum necessary to make sure the
accused doesn't pose a threat to
others at the University.
THE COORDINATOR would not be
able to suspend or expel a student as
previous drafts of the code allowed.
And the student would have a right to
appeal the severity of the coor-
dinator's punishment.
Within a 10-day period, the Univer-
sity would have to hold a hearing or
the charges against the student would
be dropped.
Yesterday, councilmembers
decided the hearing board should be
made up of one faculty member, one
administrator, and one student. The
'administration, in its last code
proposal two years ago, would have
formed a hearing board comprised
completely of students. The students
would be selected by the University
'president.
ACCORDING to the council, MSA
would present a pool of students,
SACUA would offer a pool of faculty,
and the president would submit
names of administrators to the coun-
cil at the beginning of every year.
The council would then randomly
,elect a series of 3-member hearing
boards which would be alternately
used with every hearing.
The accused would have the right to
challenge any member of the board as
being biased.
Councilmembers also agreed
yesterday that a hearing could be
avoided if the University and the ac-
cused agreed, for example, that the
University would not pursue the case
if the accused agreed to counseling.
AT YESTERDAY'S regents
meeting, the board agreed to invest
about $5.8 million in the Common
Hello ... is that right?

The Daily?
The Michigan Daily?
'Carries Bloom County ...
THE BLOOM COUNTY?
(,'

Fund's South Africa-Free Equity
Fund.
The fund, said Norm Herbert, the
University's investment officer, is a
pool of investments in companies that
do not do business in South Africa.
The Common Fund, Herbert said, is
an organization which allows colleges
and universities to pool their resour-
ces. Previously, the money was in-
vested in the Common Fund's equity
pool. The pool, however, included in-
vestments in companies that do
business in South Africa.
The regents also yesterday voted to
observe Martin Luther King's birth-
day on campus and urged "all admin-
strators and faculty to be as thought-
ful as possible to those who wish to ob-
serve this day in some special way."
VAN DYCK DOBOS STUDIOS
VALENTINE
SPECIAL
2 - 3" x 5"s for $5.00
if taken before Jan. 31st.
663-6966
" Passport - Immigration
" Resume - Application
" Portraits
"Reasonable Rates"
407 E. WILLIAM
c. Division- Ann Arbor

Classes in ballet,
modern, jazz, tap,
and ballroom.
New Classes
beginning January 13

For current class
schedule and
more information
call 995-4242.

P "

FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES
CONSIDER THE BACHELOR
OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
DEGREE PROGRAM
REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION ARE:
1. Junior status - 55 transferable credit
hours by Fall Term 1986
2. English: English Composition (one term)
3. Principles of Economics (micro and macro)
4. Mathematics: Calculus (one term)
5. Principles of Accounting: (one term)
APPLICATION PREFERENCE DATE:
January through March 15, 1986
Applications can be picked up in The School of Business,
The Office of Admissions and Student Services - Room 158.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON THE BBA PROGRAM,
CALL THE OFFICE OF ADMISSIONS
AND STUDENT SERVICES - 763-5796
" OR
STOP BY TO SEE THE PRE-BUSINESS ADVISOR
IN 1213 ANGELL HALL

711 N. University (near State Street) * Ann Arbor

SORORITY WINTER RUSH 1986

Dates: Jan. 19 - Jan. 25

Dress Informal

CONTACT PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION FOR DETAILS
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