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April 23, 1986 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-04-23

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STUDEN TS
LEAVING ANN ARBOR!

SPORTS

The Michigan Daily

Vednesday, April 23, 1986

Page 12

-he
MA L
hoppe

The
MAIL SHOPPE
323 E. William
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
(between 5th Ave. and Division)
next to U-M Credit Union
665-6676

I

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By Phil Nussel

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your clothes, typewriters, TV's,
stereo components, computers,
framed pictures, books, housewares.
" Professional, experienced packing specialists
" Handling UPS, Federal Express, and US Mail
(foreign and domestic)
{ We also ship to all foreign countries
" Packing supplies available: boxes and tape
" We also ship pre-wrapped parcels
" Package pick-up service available
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Mon.- Fri. 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Sunday Noon - 5 p.m.
Our boxes and shipping costs are
the lowest in Ann Arbor!

S PRING FOOTBALL is over. Wow.
Now that these over-publicized workout
sessions are over, we can finally talk about some
real football - fall football.
The Wolverines came out of the spring drills
with no major injuries. They are all set to build
upon the 10-1-1 mark set in 1985. Head coach Bo
Schembechler refused to say who the new faces
would be in the starting lineup next fall, but as
you might expect, he has some hunches.
Unfortunately, he won't reveal those either. So
I'm going to do it for him. Here is my prediction
for the starting lineup (barring injuries) in Sep-
tember:
The defense will be a hotbed of competition in
the fall with five spots opening up. Don't worry,
though, there's plenty of experience back to plug
those holes.
* Outside linebacker - Look for fifth-year
seniors Dieter Heren and Steve Thibert to take
over these two open spots. Nobody remembers
that these two guys started last year's season
opener against Notre Dame. Juniors Carlitos
Bostic and Tim Schulte will get a good amount of
playing time, but will have to wait another year
before they get to start.
* Inside linebacker - Yes, Andy Moeller is
back for his fifth year and, unless he disappears,
he will lead the team in tackling for the second
straight year. Mike Mallory's spot will be filled
by Andree McIntyre, a quick,hard-hitting player
who could have started last year.

" Tackle - Mark Messner wi
way to becoming an All-America
who will fill Mike Hammerstein
Dave Folkertsma. Nobody else is
" Center -It's the toughest pos
endurance-wise. That's why B
Mike Reinhold will split the dut
again. Harris will be the officials
* Cornerback - The opening h
grabs between Dave Arnold and
ned wide receiver turned corner
pbell. Arnold will be the man. C
has injury trouble. Garland Rive
Playboy All-American, will obvi
for a banner year at his end. He 1o
ever in the spring game.
* Safety - Ivan Hicks and To
say more?
On offense, almost everybody i
the way Schembechler has juggl
line, it makes me wonder what t
to look like in September.
" Offensive line - I'm not eve.
name the specific positions yet.
what is going to happen here u:
merstein puts on his pads and st
crap out of people. If he ends
alright, he will play guard al
Husar. John Vitale looks like the
ter what. John "Jumbo" Elli
Quaerna should be the other twos
" Tight End - Another confusin

Starters in the fall...
...here's a good bet
11 be well on his se. Let's put it this way, ex-quarterback Bob
an next year, but Cernak will not be the starter. But since I'm
's shoes? It'll be picking starters, I'll take Keith Mitchell, only
s close. because he looked tough in the spring game.
sition on defense " Quarterback - It's nice to have this position
illy Harris and taken care of for a change. Harbaugh is healthy
ies nearly 50/50 and ready to be one of the nation's top quarter-
starter. backs in '86. Chris Zurbrugg will remain the
ere will be up for backup. Look for Demetrius Brown in '87..
cornerback tur- " Runningback - Jamie Morris and Gerald
neback rikram-White should better their success of '85. They
back Erik Cam- have a solid corps of backups behind them in the
ampbell usually likes of Thomas Wilcher, Phil Webb, Ernie
rs, a pre-season Holloway, and Bob Perryman.
ously be looking . Wide Receiver - At 6-8, people are saying
ooked as good as now that Paul Jokisch will be the Big Ten's best
receiver in '86. I agree. It gets pretty hilarious
ny Gant, need I seeing 5-9 guys try to stop him. On the wide side
is John Kolesar, the only player on the team who
is back, but with calls Schembechler "Bo" to his face. That's
led the offensive pretty sly for a frosh, but with the kind of season
things are going he had, I'm sure he doesn't get yelled at too
n going to try to loudly.
. Nobody knows " Kicking - I saved the best for last. After
.ntil Mark Ham- going 4-4 kicking field goals in the spring game,
arts beating the Schembechler admitted Pat Moons has the edge.
up recovering Rick Sutkiewicz still looks like the man for kick
ong with Mike offs, though. Mike Gillette, the regular kicker for
center no mat- most of last year, has been in Schembechler's
iott and Jerry doghouse since his suspension last fall and his
starters. playing baseball this spring, I'm sure, isn't
nig spot on offen- helping his prospects for the fall.

U U

PARSONS
SCHOOL OF DESIGN
Special Summer Programs
Parsons in Paris: 6-week program July 1-August 13, 1986
Painting, drawing, art history and the liberal arts. Paris, and the Dordogne
countryside or Siena, Italy.
Fashion in Paris July 1-July 30, 1986
Fashion illustration, a history of European design and contemporary trends
in French fashion. Slide presentations, museums, studio and retail outlets,
guest lectures.
Photography in Paris July 1-July 30, 1986
The aesthetics and craft of photography. Lectures, gallery visits and shooting
assignments.
Architecture and Design in Paris July 1- July 30, 1986
European decorative arts and the history of French architecture. Parsons
faculty and staff members of the Musee des Arts De'coratifs.
Parsons in Italy June 30-July 29, 1986
Contemporary Italian design and the history of Italian architecture. Rome,
Florence and Venice.
Ceramics and Fibers in Japan July 17-August 17, 1986
Ceramics, fibers and the history of Japanese crafts. Cultural background in
Tokyo and Kyoto, and studio experiences at Bunka University (fibers) or the
small village of Inbe (ceramics).
Fashion in Japan July 17-August 17, 1986
Traditional and contemporary interpretations of classic clothing. Tokyo and
Kyoto. Wbrkshops, visits to studios, museums and retail outlets, and presen-
tations by well-known Japanese designers.
Graphic Design In Japan July 17-August 17, 1986
Survey of contemporary Japanese graphic design and traditional influences
in Tokyo and Kyoto. Workshops, gallery and studio visits and presentations.
Parsons in West Africa July 6-August 2, 1986
Ceramics, fibers, metalsmithing, photography, archaeology or traditional
African art and architecture. The Ivory Coast and/or Mali (8/6-8125/86).
Parsons at Lake Placid June 29-August 8, 1986
One and two-week workshops in ceramics, metals, surface design, fibers
and printmaking. A small upper N.Y. state village-and ultra-modern Center
for the Arts-with a long artistic history.
Bank Street/Parsons June 30-July 30, 1986
A joint three-summer Master's degree program with the prestigious Bank
Street College of Education. The curriculum examines educational supervi-
sion and administration with a visual arts focus.
College in New York June 23-July 24, 1986
Full-time study in a specified art and design area. Drawing, painting, com-
munication design, photography, environmental design, illustration, fashion
illustration or fashion design.
Pre-College in New York June 23-July 24, 1986
A full-time opportunity. For high school students considering college majors
in drawing, painting, communication design, photography, environmental
design, illustration, fashion illustration, fashion merchandising or fashion
design. Introduction to art and design also available.
Pre-College in France July 16-August 13, 1986
High school students of artistic promise visit Paris and the Dordogne region.
College-level drawing, painting and prehistoric archaeology.
Pre-College in Greece August, 1986
Promising high school students are introduced to ancient Greek culture. In-
tensive drawing and painting projects in Athens, the Pelopponese and the
Greek Islands. Focus also includes Greek art and architecture.
All foreign programs include air transportation, land transfers and accom-
modations. Dormitory arrangements for New York prdgrams-and hotel
lodgings for Lake Placid-are available. Selected programs are offered with
undergraduate credit, graduate credit and non-credit options. For additional
information, please return the coupon below or call (212) 741-8975.

Pistons trip up Hawks

PONTIAC (UPI) - Isiah Thomas
made a basket and two free throws
early in the fourth quarter to turn
back an Atlanta comeback attempt
and keep the Detroit Pistons alive in
their NBA playoff with a 106-97 vic-
tory over the Hawks last night.
Atlanta entered the final period
trailing 84-68 but scored the first
seven points to make it 84-75 with 9:33
left.
BUT DETROIT'S sprarkplug
guard, playing with an ulcerated

urinary bladder, pumped in a shot
from near the top of the key at the 8:36
mark for the Pistons' first points of
the quarter and added two free throws
24 seconds later to restore his team's
lead at 88-75.
The Hawks, who had blown out the
Pistons at Atlanta in the first two
games of the best-of-five series, still
maintain a 2-1 lead with the fourth
game set for Friday night in the Pon-
tiac Silverdome.
Kelly Tripucka led Detroit with 33

SHADY TRAILS CAMP
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Colin A. MacPherson, Assistant Director
1111 E. Catherine, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109
(313) 764-4493
A Non-Discriminatory, Affirmative Action Employer

11

O0N SALE
20% off all Mias
Leather Loafers $26 -
2 pr. for $45

ii

points and combined with Earl
Cureton to hold Dominique Wilkins to
21 after the Atlanta star had bombed
the Pistons for 50 in Game 2.
WILKINS didn't score in the fourth
quarter until 3:49 remained, when his
free throws made it 96-84.
Guard Glenn Rivers was second for
Atlanta with 20 while Randy Wittman,
checked more closely by Thomas af-
ter a career best 35, had 14 and Tree
Rollins 10 for the Hawks.
Thomas added 20 points to Detroit's
attack and rookie Joe Dumars had 17
as the Pistons kept their record intact
of not having lost a game this season
in 11 in which they had held their op-
ponents under 100.
Detroit also paid more attention to
5-7 Spud Webb, who had four points,
and cut down its turnovers.
The Pistons only played eight men
in the game and one of them saw just
limited action. -
Detroit held a 76-64 edge with 2:34
left in the third quarter but Thomas,
who had 10 points in the period, hit a
trio of 14-footers plus a pair of free
throws.
Boston 6, Detroit 4
BOSTON (AP) - Don Baylor, Rich
Gedman and Tony Armas homered
off Jack Morris in the first five in-
nings to power the Boston Red Sox to a
6-4 victory over the Detroit Tigers last
night.
It was a doubly costly loss for
Detroit as right fielder Kirk Gibson
severely sprained his left ankle and
will be sidelined for four to six weeks.
MORRIS, 2-2, had given up four
homers in Detroit's 6-5 opening-day
victory over Boston. Winner Roger
Clemens, 3-0, struck out 10 Tigers
before leaving with two outs in the
seventh.
Baylor gave the Red Sox the lead
for good with his fourth homer of the
season, a two-run blast in the third in
ning after Wade Boggs singled. It
made the score 3-2.
Boston ripped Morris for two more
runs in the fourth on Gedman's
leadoff homer, his second, and Boggs'
double that drove in Dwight Evans.
Evans had walked, stolen second and
gone to third when catcher Lance
Parrish threw the ball into center
field.
Armas, who totaled 102 homers for
the past three seasons, hit his first of
the year in the sixth, giving Boston a
6-2 lead. Dave Collins singled in
Detroit's final run in the seventh.
-- ---- --.............-
i I
I I
I
I 4I
II
I Normandie
Flowers
1104 S. UNIVERSITY
. oQAx1Qt 1

In

six spring colors

1208 S. University
769-2088

ecials end 4-26

LI

TESTIMONY OF A

Parsons School of Design, Office of Special Programs
66 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10011
Please send me information on the following
special summer programs:

APR. 24
3:00 PM
UNION-POND
REV. BRICEI WILLIAMS

01
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Parsons/Paris
Fashion/Paris

0

Parsons/West Africa
Parsons/Lake Placid

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