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January 08, 1986 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

--

The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, January 8, 1986- Page 5
University replacement hospital
delays opening until February

By EVE BECKER
Fire code violations and delays in
equipment shipments forced the can-
cellation of last week's scheduled
opening of the new University
Hospital, which is now slated to open
the first week of February.
"There were a number of problems
(with the new hospital)," said Ken
Trester, the hospital's director of
planning and merchandising.
"Primarily, we didn't have all of the
equipment needed."
LINDA AYERS, public relations
manager for the Replacement
Hospital Project, cited problems in
the medical gas system which is used
for performing tests on patients as
one of the causes of the delayed grand
opening.

The new hospital has run into
problems with officials who have
cited fire safety violations. Several
fire officials have been involved in the
planning of the new hospital, said
Ayers, and they have all cited dif-
ferent problems, a result of varying
interpretations of fire code
regulations.
Workers are making corrections in
the design of a fire wall and testing
the fire alarm system in an attempt to
comply with the law.
DIFFICULTIES in receiving
equipment were unexpected. For
example, the company from which
the hospital ordered its radiology
equipment went bankrupt, Ayers

said, and other equipment has simply
been late in arriving.
Everything in the old University
hospital will be moved to the new site
by the end of 1986. February is the
starting date to move patients,
although some units, like the burn
center, will be moved later in the yeah
as their facilities are completed.
Ayers expects a slight cutback in
the number of patients accepted to the
hospital because of the move,
although she said they will be running
up to capacity until the move.
The new hospital is connected to the
old hospital, and patients willbe
moved through covered and insulated
walkways to the new site, she said.

rII ' a

Throwing in the towel
Agriculture Secretary John Block raises his hands yesterday after announcing that he will leave his post
sometime in mid-February. Block said he has accomplished his primary objective for farmers by pushing a
new five-year farm bill through Congress.
NRC to hold private meetings

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WASHINGTON (AP) - Despite
widespread opposition, the Nuclear
Regulatory Commission is planning to
take more of its discussions about how
it deals with atomic safety problems
behind closed doors in what it calls
"non-meeting gatherings."
In a proposed final regulation that
could be approved formally next
week, a majority of the five commis-

sioners already has signaled it will
change the agency's definition of a
"meeting," under the federal Sun-
shine Act to exclude "big picture"
discussions.
According to an NRC memo
released yesterday by a congressional
critic of the agency, the change also
would allow the commissioners to
hold nonpublic gatherings to discuss

the agency's relations with Congress,
the news media, the nuclear industry,
nuclear opponents, and "the public as
a whole."
The commission has scheduled a
public meeting for Jan. 17 to discuss
and possibly vote formally on the
changes, which triggered an out-
pouring of more than 50 opposing
editorials and 32 formal comments.

Cleveland Pneumatic Company is seeking two persons for its newly established
Manufacturing Engineering Technology Scholarship Program.
To qualify, you must:
"*be completing second year studies;
" be an Engineering (Mechanical or Industrial) major;
" have top academic credentials including strong mathematics studies;
" be a permanent resident of the Greater Cleveland area (family residence within 30
miles of Cleveland);
" have an interest in the Manufacturing Engineering field.
Additional desirable credentials include:
" demonstrated skills or experience in Manufacturing Engineering;
" manufacturing work experience;
" knowledge of the aerospace industry.
We are offering a scholarship for up to $9,000 plus summer employment for students
who qualify for third and fourth year studies in the Manufacturing Engineering
Programs at Boston University (Boston, MA) or Weber State (Ogden, UT).
To apply, send a letter of interest to:
Linda Urmetz, Cleveland Pneumatic Company, 3781 East 77th Street, Cleveland,
Ohio 44105. An Equal Opportunity Employer, M/F/H.

Freshmen pool tops last year's level

(Continued from Page 1)
According to Sjogren, this may reveal how the in-
creased statistics are deceiving. "It could he students are
jhst applying earlier this year," he said. "We can't say
there will be a substantial increase overall."
K The statistics are also deceiving because of an across-
(the-board increase in applications to state schools.
ACCORDING to John Alexander, a counselor at
4highland Park High School in Illinois, "As private school
costs are rising, students are applying more to public
state schools. As a result, those numbers are all in-
,creasing."
j1 Students in many areas are also applying to a larger
number of schools. Larry Stern, counselor at Huron High
School in Ann Arbor, recommends that each of his stud-
+nts apply to 10 schools. "You should apply to a lot of

schools," he said. "The decision is yours only after you've
been accepted."
Jenny Tan, a senior at Lyons Township High School in
Illinois, adheres to this belief. "I've applied to University
of Michigan, University of Illinois, University of Chicago,
Northwestern, Johns Hopkins, Brown, Princeton, Har-
vard, University of Wisconsin, and Boston University,"
Tan said.
"'I was unsure, and all of those schools are basically the
same academically," she added. "I figured it was safer -
I'd at least get accepted at one."
The University intends to accept between 8,000 and 9,000
applicants from the pool which, as estimated by Erickson,
now numbers over 10,000 applications. This large pool of
applicants will ensure that the 4,400 slots are filled, he
said.

Cleveland
Pneumatic
Landing Gear

. u
An IC Industries Company

- _ _

I

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