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April 07, 1986 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-04-07

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, April 7, 1986 - Page 7

A2 candidates predict

close outcome in

0

4

(Continued from Page 1)
paign we figured we had a 40 percent
chance of winning the election," he
said.
But even Doris Preston, the
Democratic incumbant who has a
slight advantage, is not taking any
chances.
"KATHY Edgren (D-Fifth Ward)
won by 1,000 votes last year. I don't
think that will happen this year," she
said. "There are not enough in-
teresting issues on the ballot to bring
people out. With lower turnouts you
have to work a lot harder."
Huron Plaza hotel and conference

center, one of the most controversial
developments to reach the ocuncil,
would have been located in the Fifth
Ward, and Preston and Spear are split
on the issue.
Neighbors have opposed the 14-
story, 400-room hotel and conference
center which would have been
surrounded by Washington, First,
Huron, and Ashley streets. Most
businessmen in the area, however,
welcome the project.
Although the council defeated the
Huron Plaza cite plan last month, the
controversy is not over because the
developer, Richard Berger, sued the

city for not accepting the a legal site
plan.
PRESTON, a University librarian,
voted against the conference center
partly because the plan did not
provide enough parking spaces and
would have interfered with traffic
flow downtown. She also said the site
development agreement between the
city and the developer was too vague.
If the developer decided to build 100
hotel rooms instead of 400, she said,
the city couldn't do anything about it.
"The site development agreement
didn't give the city that much power
to negotiate with the developer," she

said.
Spear, however, adamantly suppor-
ts the conference center because it
would be an economic boon to down-
town Ann Arbor. He said he is not
worried about the center causing an
increased amount of traffic. "You
have to put up with a little incon-
venience," he said. Both candidates
agree that one way to revitalize and
bring more people downtown would be
to create more housing in the area.
"The city needs housing down-
town," Spear said. "I'm not in favor
of giving the land, we just have to
cooperate with developers."

:
ity counc
PRESTON also favors mor down-
town housing, but unlike Spear she
would liketo see more low-income
housing with some city involvement.
Spear and Preston also disagree on
Proposal B which would allow the city
to sell up to $3 million in tax bonds to
taxpayers and use the money for
repairing roads. Within five years the
city will return the money to tax-
payers with interest.
Spear opposes the proposal because
he considers roads a "basic" service
that should be paid from the city's
general fund.
"I don't believe that the party in
power (the Democrats), who have a 6-
5 majority in the council is showing
good fiscal responsibility," said
Spear. "They continually reject a con-
ference center which would bring in
$1.7 million in taxes."
THE DEMOCRATS also guaran-
teed another paid holiday for Martin
Luther King's birthday to city em-
ployees, which wil cost the city
$170,000, Spear said.
Spear believes the city could cut
back on such expenditures and spend
more money on roads.
Preston, however, will vote for the
tax-bond issue. "I hope it passes. I
know that Republicans think there is

il elections
money in the general fund to pay for
the resurfacing, but I seriously doubt
that," she said.
"If we do find the funds, we don't
have to sell as many bonds," Preston
said. 'Also, the money they are
looking for in the fund will only last
one year, and we need it for than that."
"I would have liked to see a five-
to ten-year millage, but since we had
no support from the Republicans, we
had to go with this," she said. "We
have to keep up our road program."
"THE REASON why our roads are
in bad shape now is because we have
not been doing that," Preston added.
The candidates also disagree on
Proposal A, which would send a
message to Washington that the city's
tax dollars should not support
military aid in Central America. The
proposal would also create a task for-
ce to establish a sister city
somewhere in Central America.
Spear will not support the proposal
because he said local politics should
only be involved with local issues, not
foreign policy.
"It has nothing to do with my per-
sonal feelings on it," he said. "It just
does not belong on the local ballot."
But Preston disagrees.
"It is a good way for local gover-
nment to have some impact on foreign
issues," she said.

Voters consider proposals in city elections

(Continued from Page 1)
they don't think the proposal can
change national policy, but they hope
it will educate people about the
situation in Central America.
The Rev. Don Coleman, a spokesman
for the coalition, said he doesn't ex-
pect much opposition to the proposal.
"As far as I can tell, the proposal will
sail right through," he said. "There
are no opponents that have become
public, or at least no organized op-
position."
Coleman said some people refused
to sign the petition to get the proposal
on the ballot because they didn't con-
sider U.S. foreign policy a "local
issue."
"OUR CONTENTION is that this is
a local issue because the young men in
S Ann Arbor will be killed if we have a

war in Central America," said
Coleman. He added that cutbacks in
federal social spending would be less
severe if military aid were reduced.
Most city council Democrats sup-
port the proposal because they con-
sider it an appropriate way to affect
national policy. Republicans on the
council, however, generally agree
that Ann Arbor should stay out of
national politics.
The council also splits along party
lines over Proposal B, which would
allow the city to sell $3 million in tax
bonds over a three-year period to
finance the repair and resurfacing of
residential streets.
UNLIKE A millage, which would
directly assess the taxpayers, a tax
bond means the city has to pay back
the $3 million with interest.

The six council Democrats
originally tried to put a millage
proposal on the ballot, but they had to
settle for a tax bond proposal when
they were unable to convince the
Republican caucus to go along.
Both parties agree that the roads
need to be resurfaced, but the
Republicans think it should be done
with money from the general fund.
They argue that because roads are a
"basic" service, the city should cut
from less important areas to get the

necessary funds.
If the proposal is approved by the
voters, the bonds will be sold this
year, according to Leigh Chizek, the
assistant city adminstrator for
engineering services. That means a
homeowner whose house is worth
$80,000 would pay approximately $20 a
year beginning in 1987.
The city administrator has
budgeted $600,000 for road repair next
year, but the council wants to add $1
million to that figure.

Kemp tells receptive crowd of Republican upswing

Continued From Previous Page

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(Continued from Page 1)
"There are two way to make people
equal: You can make the rich poor or
you can make the poor rich. I prefer the
latter," ne said. "The answer to
poverty is more investment and
economic growth."
After the speech, Kemp said the
deficits accumulated under the
Reagan administration "are no
issue." He said the deficits are
currently decreasing - not because of
the Gramm-Rudman deficit-
reduction law, which heopposes, but
because of Reagan's growth policies.
Existing deficits he said, are due to
high interest rates rather than low
taxes.
ON GLOBAL issues, Kemp said the
"Soviet colonial empire" is failing
because the Republicans and "a few
lonely Democrats" have provided
military support to rebels in Angola,
Nicaragua, and Afghanistan.
Kemp characterized as "madness"
the current doctrine of mutual
assured destruction, which dominated
U.S. nuclear arms policy during the
1960s and '70s. He strongly supported
Reagan's Strategic Defense Initiative
as an attempt to move away from the
notion that neither the United States
nor the Soviet Union can fire these
nuclear missiles without an assurance
of deadly retaliation.
"Everyone should demand that we
move away from a doctrine of
destruction to one of defense," he
said.
Kemp declared that the time had
come for the Republican Party to
assume leadership of the country.
Addressing what he called a belief
that the GOP is only concerned with
material wealth, he said, "Of course
man can't live by bread alone, but he
can't live without it either."
HE ASSERTED that the

Republican Party was becoming the
leading representative of the average
worker. He contrasted the Republican
slogan of opportunity and hope with
the Democratic theme that he sees as
preaching limits and inability.
Kemp closed his speech by saying,
"Welcome to the party of the people!"
He left to a standing ovation.
Kemp has not yet officially declared
himself a candidate for president, and
after the speech he said he would wait
until 1987 to make an announ-
cement. Yet his speech at the Univer-
sity, sandwiched between two other
Michigan speaking engagements,
resembled a campaign stop.
ACCORDING to University
Political Science Prof. George
Grassmuck, Kemp was here on a
presidential campaign swing. "Why
should he be in Michigan otherwise?"
he asked.
Grassmuck explained that the
Michigan Republican Party will not
be using an open primary to choose
the Presidential nominee in 1988. In-
stead, precinct delegates will be elec-
ted this fall who will select state
delegates from their ranks. These
state delegates will determine which
Republican candidate will get
Michigan's support in the 1988 elec-
tion.
Candidates such as Kemp and Bush,
said Grassmuck, are making frequent
visits to Michigan in order to win the
support of potential precinct
delegates. He said Kemp and others
will not declare their candidacy
because of other campaigns - Kemp
said he will run for re-election in New
York this fall - and in order to avoid
federal campaign laws.
Kemp was a professional football
quarterback for 13 years before he
became a Congressman in 1970.
Although he was introduced by two

According to newspaper accounts, his
receptions have been warm but he has
been hindered by poor campaign
organization.
Kemp was brought to the University
through the efforts of LSA senior Jef-
frey Evans, Executive Director of
College Republicans. According to
Evans, the College Republicans are
evenly split in their support between
Jack Kemp and George Bush, except
for a small percentage that supports
candidates such as Dole, Pat Rober-
tson, and former Sen. Howard
Baker.
Evans, who is "a Kemp supporter
all the way," said College
Republicans is attempting to bring
Dole to speak at the University in the
fall.

Kemp
...-charms students
former Detroit Lions teammates, he
is most often associated with the Buf-
falo Bills. Such a background can be
very helpful in a presidential race,
according to Grassmuck, since
"name identification is all-important
at the primary stage."
In recent months Kemp has been
traveling extensively, including a trip
to Western Europe during which he
met with such European leaders as
Helmut Kohl of Germany and
Margaret Thatcher of Great Britain.

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