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April 04, 1986 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-04-04

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Impact Jazz troupe
dance bop and pop

The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 4, 1986 - Page 7
Film depicts Holocaust misery

By Kristen A rdel
SPRINGTIME is finally here, and
the members of the University's
Impact Jazz Dance company are put-
ting on their dancing shoes to
celebrate this weekend, April 3, 4, and
5, with three performances that will
showcase the talents they have been
honing over the winter.
The 18-member Impact Jazz Dan-
ce company is composed of nondance
majors chosen in fall auditions, and
like all University Acitvities Center
(UAC) groups, the organization is
completely student-run. The members
of the company claim full respon-
sibility for the choreography, lighting
and execution of its performances.
Contrary to what its name might im-
ply, the group does not dance to solely
the genre of music the average person
recognizes as "jazz," but rather to a
wide range of popular contemporary
music. This weekend's performance
will feature a variety of upbeat tunes,
THE DAILY
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ranging from Aretha Franklin and
Chaka Kahn to the Thompson Twins
and Split Enz. The shows this
weekend are the highlight of the
group's 1985-86 year. Their other ac-
tivities include weekly practices, and
dance workshops put on in the
Michigan Union for varying levels of
dance proficiency.
One factor that might hinder atten-
dance for this weekend's shows is the
way-off-campus location of the per-
formances, namely at Slauson Inter-
mediate School, the whereabouts of
which a vast majority of students are
probably oblivious. Usually the group
stages its spring show on campus, and
according to Kristi Davis, co-
directors of the group, this year's per-
formance was originally scheduled at
the University's Mendelssohn
Theater. However, this slating fell
during final exam week, so the group
decided to opt for an off-campus
location at a more convenient date.
The location of the Slauson School
auditorium, at Ninth and Washington,
way on the other side of Main Street,
makes the performances less ac-
cessible to students, but Davis says
that the company hopes to alleviate
low attendance problems with a
more-extensive-than-usual publicity
campaign.-
Tickets for the performances are
$3.00 in advance, or $3.50 at thedoor,
and are now available at the
Michigan Union Ticket World.

(Continued from Page 5)
does not edit out many segments that
neither show action nor tell part of a
testimony. Lanzmann gives the
audience time to reflect on the
testimony. Even with the slow pace,
the nine and a half hour film does not
drag.
Shoah reveals many crucial aspects
of the Holocaust. It demonstrates,
almost by accident, the thorough
German deception. The Germans
used code words for the extermination
of the Jews, calling it "the final
solution to the Jewish problem."
"Relocation" was really the depor-
tation of Jews to the camps, and
"resettlement" was their exter-
mination. The Jews were
"processed" in the concentration and
death camps, and when they arrived,
the sick, aged, and young were taken
to the "infirmary" where they were
"cured with one pill."
The infirmary was a pit where
Jews were taken and shot in the back
of the neck and fall into the pit, which
was usually filled with already bur-
ning bodies.
Former SS men relay the exact
conditions and occurences to the
audience. One former SS man said of
various death camps, "Treblinka was
a prison, but Auschwitz was an ef-
ficient production line of death.
Belzac was a laboratory."
One overriding question that sur-
faces during the testimony of the
Polish peasants is; how could they
stand by and watch the destruction of
the Jews? How could they watch
fellow human beings being an-
nihilated? Although the film may not
offer any obvious answer to this
question, Holocaust Historian Raul
Hilberg presents a possibility.
Hilberg describes the Holocaust as
a natural step in the long history of
European anti-semitic action. First,
he said, was conversion to
Christianity, then expulsion (ghet-
toization), and finally, territorial
solution (extermination). The only
thing the Nazis invented, said
Hilberg, was the methodology of the
final step.
Hilberg's point is substantiated by
the Polish peasants' use of historical

anti-Semitic language. They spoke of
the Jews owning everything, of
beautiful Jewesses who "liked to
make love," and that the Jews spoke
"Jew," possibly refering to Yiddish.
Although Lanzmann does not use
any archival footage in this work, and
he does not show pictures of corpses
and other Nazi atrocities within the
camps, it is not necessary. The
testimony of the survivors and the
witnesses relays incidents from the
Holocaust that stir the audience's
emotions at least as effectively.
Filip Muller, a Czech Jew who sur-
vived five liquidations at Auschwitz,
and part of the "special detail", tells
many stories of the gassings and
burings he witnessed during his stay
in Auschwitz. He tells of the struggle
for like by the victims within the gas
chambers, of the crematoria, and of
the general conditions in the camp.
Throughout his testimony, Muller did
not stop to display any emotion. He
did not crack, he just told his story.
Then came his explanation of the fate
of the Czech family camp..

voice rose from the mass of people, as
they began to sing the Czech national
anthem, he said.
Muller then stopped. Tears welled
in his eyes, and he cried openly, con-
tinuing, "- and Hatikvac, "(the
hope) Hatikva at that time was the
song of the Zionist nationalist
movement, and is today the Israeli
national anthem. Translated from
Hebrew, it says, "As long as the
heart inside the Jewish soul beats,
And the eye looks eastward, for-
wrd to Zion, / Then our hope is
not lost. / The land of 2000 years,
/ To be a free people in our land, /
The land of Zion and Jerusalem."
At this point, Muller entered thegas
chamber with the Czech family group,
resolved to die with his countrymen.
He was recognized by a group of
women, who approached him and
said, "Your death is not going to give
us back our lives. You must get out
alive. You must bear witness to our
sufferings, to the injustices done to
us." Muller did not remain in the gas
chamber.

"We contributed to humanity. We
are humans. It never happened before
in history, what is happening to our
people. Perhaps it will shake the con-
science of the world. We have no
country. We have no government."
The Jewish political leaders then told
the courrier that they wanted "that it
become a part of (the Allies) overall
strategy in this war-not only the
defeat of Germany, but saving the
Jewish people."
Throughout the film, Lanzmann
uses all the sites shown as they appear
today, to demonstrate that history
does not die. It lives in the present
and in the future. Consequences
manifest themselves in today's and
tomorrow's worlds.
A man tells the story of how he
emerged fromthe sewers after the
Warsaw Ghetto uprising. "I had the
feeling I was the last Jew," he said. "I
waited for the morning, and I waited
for the Germans." This waiting:
makes the major point of Lanzmann's
documentary. Just as this man waited
in vain for the Germans, so the world
waits in vain for the conclusion of the
Holocaust. In the movie, the history is
incomplete. In reality, the event has
no end.
Shoah will be presented at the
Michigan Theatre April 6-17. Part
I will be shown Sun., April 6 and
13 at noon, and Mon.-Thurs.,
April 7-10 at 6:30 p.m. Part II willi
be shown. Sun., April 6 and 13 and
Mon.-Thurs., April 14-17, at
6:30 p.m. General admission
tickets are. $15, students $10, for
the entire showing, and are
available through Ticketworld, the
Michigan Theatre Box Office, and
at Hillel.For more information,
call Hillel, 663-3336.
USE DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

'The allies cannot treat this war only from
a purely military and strategic stan-
dpoint. .. They will win the war with such
an attitude, but what will it do to us? We
will not survive this war.'
-said to Polish courier
by Polish Jews

CJI I t4
Continued From Previous Page

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He told of how the entire B II B sec-
tion of Auschwitz, which housed a
good number of Czech families for six
months, was brought to Crematorium
III, to the undressing room, and how
they rebelled against the SS guards.
As he watched the struggle of his
fellow countrymen, he said he felt
"my life was becoming
meaningless." He continued to tell the
story of the struggle. Suddenly, one

From this incident, the film
progresses to a courrier for the Polish
govern ment in exile, who relays the
Jews' message to the audience.
"The Allies cannot treat this war
only from a purely military and
strategic standpoint," the courrier
says two Jewish political leaders told
him. "They will win the war with such
an attitude, but what will it do to us?
We will not survive this war."

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