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April 04, 1986 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-04-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Last of protesters arraigned

The Michigan Daily - Friday, April 4, 1986-- Page 3

By STEVE HERZ
The final 40 of the 118 protesters
arrested last month for trespassing
outside Rep. Carl Pursell's (R-Ann
Arbor) office were arraigned yester-
day in city court.
Three of the protesters, all of them
members of the Latin American
Solidarity Committee, pleaded guilty
to the charges. Kate Young, an LSA
junior in the Residential College,
Maria Reinhart, an LSA junior, and
Jacqueline Hart, an LSA sophomore,

may face a maximum fine of $180 or
72 hours of community service.
THE three guilty pleas bring the
total number of guilty pleas to five in
this week's proceedings. One
protester, William Michael, changed
his not guilty plea Wednesday to 'no
contest,' which means he will be sen-
tenced as a guilty party.
The six demonstrators will be sen-
tenced April 30, following an inter-
view with each one.
"Because this is my first offense

they might lower the sentence," said
Hart, who said she was still not con-
cerned about what action the court
might take.
"I'm pleading guilty because I did
something wrong and I'm going to pay
the consequences. I'm not backing
down from what I believe in.
Basically they are pleading guilty to
make a statement," Hart said.
The pre trial hearing for those who
pleaded not guilty yesterday and
earlier this week will be held April 30.

DeVarti aims for 'U' student support

(Continued from Page 1)
ts' security deposits.
"It's the tenants' money and they
should not have to pursue the landlord
to get it back," he said. "One way of
insuring that will not happen is to put
it in an administrative fund."
THE CITY can put the security
deposit in an interest bearing fund,
said DeVarti, suggesting that some of
the interest pay the administrative
costs of the fund..
DeVarti is also concerned about
high rents students pay as a result of
the low vacancy rate. He said he may
consider rent control if rents keep
spiraling.
However, Jernighan, an investment
analyst for the University, is adamant-
tly opposed to rent control. He instead
favors building more housing to in-
crease the vacancy rate.
"The city is working hard in
the downtown area to develop all kin-
ds- of housing, of which a small per-
centage . will be the so-called affor-
dable (low income) housing," Jer-
nighan said.
ANOTHER issue which concerns
Jernighan is taxes, which he said he is
not in favor of raising. Jernighan said
he has spoken with real estate agents
who say property value will increase,
causing property owners to pay more.
Raising taxes will not be necessary,
he said, because.real estate agents he
consulted predict property value will
increase, forcing the owners to pay

more in taxes.
Anticipating this increased
revenue, Jernighan also rejects
Proposal B, which would allow the
city to sell $3 million in bonds to finan-
ce road repairs.
He also cited the fact that the city
would have to pay interest on money it
borrowed to finance the tax-bond
issues.
"So the city will only receive $3
million to pay for the road repair, but
it will.cost another $750,000 to pay
back the interest," said Jernighan.
BUT DeVARTI said there is not
enough money in the city's general

fund to provide adequate road repair
which is needed now. "Republicans
are near-sighted to think they can
wait."
The city currently spends around
$659,000 each year on road repairs, a
figure city officials have called insuf-
ficient.
The candidates also clash on
Proposal A, which would send a
message from the city to Washington
condemning the United States policy
of sending military aid to Central
America.

Associated Press
Fire brewing
A five-alarm fire broke out during demolition of the main building of the now-closed Stroh Brewery in Detroit
yesterday. No injuries were reported.

Letter against Tanter creates controversy

(Continued from Page 1)
of students," said Patrick Palis, an
LSA senior who wrote the petition.
The controversy culminated in
several shouting matches between st-
duents after class lectures this week.
SOME STUDENTS on both sides
think the underlying cause of the
problems may be the sensitive issues
raised in the course.
Denis Sullivan, the administrative
assistant in charge of the course's
TAs said, "I'm sure it's the nature of
the course. This is a highly
emotionally charged class. People
take sides on almost every issue.''
Richard Meints, an LSA junior who,
along with two other students, drafted
the initial letter of complaint, also

believes that the subject of the course
was one of the factors contributing to
the controversy.
"This class seems to draw out more
than usual people who are quite often
vocal about their opinions. It's the
people with firm beliefs who, when
those beliefs are challenged, attack,"
Meints said.
PALIS has taken 18 hours worth of
other, less controversial classes
taught by Tanter and said, "As far as
I'm aware there's never been any
other action like this in his other cour-
ses. The majority of students in the
class are probably moderate but we
.do have the extremes represented on

both sides."
Palis also noted that some students
in the class are citizens of Israel, Jor-
dan, and Quatar, including one
students who is a member of the
Israeli Defense Force.
Tanter said he believes that
"polarization is not necessarily bad.
If students shouting in the hall are
motivated by their interest to think
analytically, then the polarization has
served some useful function."
Meints believes that the letter has
had beneficial effects. "Everyone has
improved their attitude. A lot of
people have more respect for Tanter
and Tanter is more respectful to

students. That's a definite plus for the
class, Meints said.
Kingdon refused to comment.
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