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April 03, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-04-03

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, April 3, 1986 - Page 3

I

IRS expects smooth year

What's happening
around Ann Arbor

UCampus Cinema
Vertigo (Alfred Hitchcock, 1958)
MTF,7 p.m., Mich.
Slow moving but nevertheless, one
of Hitchcock's best. Kim Novak
plays the woman hired to fool Jim-
my Stewart. Unfortunately, love
gets in the way.
The Trouble With Harry (Alfred
Hitchcock, 1955) MTF, 9:30 p.m.,
Poor Harry . . . he's been buried
and unburied more times than
necessary in one day. It seems that
almost everybody in this small town
where Harry got murdered is admit-
ting to the crime. This hilarious
black comedy stars Shirley MacLaine
and John Forsythe.
Performances
Impact Jazz Dance Concert - UAC,
8p.m., Slauson Intermediate School,
1019 W. Washington at Eighth St.,
(763-1107).
University dance and non-dance
majors will perform their own
pieces including all types of dan-
ce-modern, jazz, ballet, tap, and
breakdancing.
Javanese Gamelan Ensemble -
University School of Music, 8 p.m.,
RackhamAuditorium, (763-4726).
Guest-artist-in-residence Aloysius
Suwardi will direct the ensemble in
an evening of traditional Javanese
music and dance.
The Merry Widow-University
School of Music Opera Theater, 8
p.m., Power Center, (764-0450).
Jay Lesenger directs a cast of
vocal performance majors and
Gustav Meier conducts the Univer-
sity Philharmonia in this opera
about turn-of-the-century Parisian
hooplah.
What the Butler Saw - Suspension
Theater, 8 p.m., Performance Net-
work, 408 W. Washington, (665-1400).
Andy Mennick directs Joe Orton's
controversial bedroom farce. A lurid
comedy-
r Bars and Clubs
THE ARK (761-1451) - Tony Bird,
blues and African pastorals.
BIRD OF PARADISE (662-8310)
- Ron Brooks Trio, jazz.
THE BLIND PIG; (996-8555) -
Frank Allison and the Odd Sox, rock
'n' roll.
THE EARLE (994-0211) - Larry
Manderville.
MR. FLOOD'S PARTY (995-2132)
- Jim Tate Band, Jeanne and the
Dreams, Los Chickens.
MAIN STREET COMEDY
SHOWCASE (995-9080) - Jeff Jen-
na.
THE NECTARINE BALLROOM
(994-5436) - DJ, dance music.
RICK'S AMERICAN CAFE (996-
2747) - Steve Nardella Rock 'n' Roll
Trio.
U-CLUB (763-2236) - Soundstage.
Speakers
D. C. Sun - "Hydrodynamic
Lubrication in Hemispherical Punch
Stretch Forming," Mechanical
Engineering and Applied
Mechanics, 3 p.m., 2233 G. G.
Brown.

Pin-Pin Wu - "The
Nonequilibrium Behavior of
Polymer Glasses," Chemistry, 4
p.m., 1200 Chemistry Bldg.
Tsuneo Atana - "Japanese Corn-
prehensive National Security: The
Maritime Dimension," Japanese
Studies, noon, Commons Room,
Lane Hall.
Tesse Gellrich - "Textuality and
the Sensual Appetite in Dant&'%
Purgatory and Chacicer's Troilus, 8
p.m., West Conf. Room, Rackham.

David Engelke - "t-RNA Gene
Expression," Genetics, noon, 1139
Natural Science Bldg.
Mark Scriber - "Genetic Control
of Dispause, Color Polymorphism,
and Food Plant Use in the Eastern
Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly,"
Biology, noon, 3056 Natural Science
Bldg.
Maria Canino - "Ethnic Studies
Programs: Yesterday andToday."
Hispanic Lecture Series, 7 p.m.,
Kuenzel Room, Union.
Mike Schiffe - "Current Resear-
ch in the Laboratory of Traditional
Technology at the University of
Arizona," Anthropology, noon, 2009
Museums Bldg.
Gernot Windfuhr - Linguistics,
noon, 3050 Frieze Bldg.
D. G. Green - "Pooling of Adap-
tation in Turtle Cones,"
Ophthalmology/Psychology/Phy-
siology/Bioengineering, 12:15 p.m.,
2032 Neuroscience Bldg.
Irene George - "Recent
Developments in Angiotensin -
Converting Enzyme Inhibitors,"
Chemistry, 4 p.m., 3554 C. C. Little
Bldg.
Meetings
Campus Crusade for Christ - 7
p.m., Hutchins Hall.
University Council - 4 p.m., 3909
Union.
Hebrew Speaking Club - 4 p.m.,
206 Angell Hall.
GEO - 8 p.m., Pond Room, Union.
Intervarsity Christian Fellowship
- 7 p.m.
AIDS and the Worried Well -
Human Sexuality Office, 8 p.m., 3200
Union.
University Alcoholics Anonymous
- noon, 3200 Union.
Furthermore
Art Print Sale - Arts and
Programming, 9 a.m., Ground floor
mall, Union.
The Operation of Secondary
Communications Processors
(SCP's) - Computing course, 7
p.m.. 1013NUBS.
South African Liberation Struggle
panel - National Weeks of Action
Against Racism and Apartheid, 7
p.m., Pendleton Room, Union.
Muslim Coffee Hour - Muslim
Students Association, noon, Union.
The Message - Muslim Students
Association film, 7:30 p.m., Aud.s4,
MLB.
Tutoring in math, science, and
engineering - Tau Beta Pi, 7 p.m.,
307 Undergraduate Library: 8 p.m.,
2332 Bursley Hall.
A Scientific Laboratory Explosion
- Pathology/Curtin Matheson
Scientific, 9a.m., Ballroom, League.
Managing Your Office Records -
HRD workshop,1 p.m.
Scottish Country Dancing -
Beginners, 7 p.m.; Intermediates, 8
p.m., Forest Hills Community Cen-
ter.

Bible Study - His House Christian
Fellowship, 7:30 p.m., 925 E. Ann.
IBM RT PC Presentation-9 a.m.,
Chrysler Auditorium.
Africa - Michigan League Inter-
national Night, 5 p.m., cafeteria,
Michigan League (764-0446).
12th Annual Michigan Antiques
Show and Sale, 6 p.m., Crisler Arena
(662-9453).
Sky Rambles/Comet Halley: Once
in a Lifetime - University Exhibit
Planetarium, 7 & 8:15 p.m., Exhibit
Museum (764-0478).

WASHINGTON (UPI) - The Inter-
nal Revenue Service, shaking off last
year's horrors, said yesterday its
processing system has run smoothly
this tax season but about half of all
taxpayers-50 million all told - have
yet to file their returns.
Even that crush of last-minute filers
racing the April 15 deadline is not ex-
pected to knock the tax collectors off
the track, in part because it happens
every year, officials said.
IRS spokeswoman Johnnell Hunter
said the processing system has been
improved by a new 24-hour hotline for
the 10 IRS service centers to report

computer problems and more
workers to handle the annual avalan-
che of returns.
"Things are going better than last
year. There is nothing that has gotten
out of control," Hunter said.
Last year, the IRS processing
operation staggered to near collapse
under the curse of errors in its new
computer system and massive
backlogs of unprocessed paperwork.
As a result, taxpayers waiting for
refunds got stories of harried IRS
workers flushing tax forms down
toilets.

This year, Hunter said, the bugs
have been worked out of the system
and the IRS has increased its staff
nationwide to handle returns.
"I believe it's safe to say our com-
puter problems have been solved,"
said IRS spokeswoman Ann Carroll in
Jacksonville, Fla.
At the end of March, Hunter said,
the IRS had mailed out 45 percent
more refunds than for the same
period in 1985. New figures on the
agency's performance this year were
expected to be reported today by IRS
Commissioner Roscoe Egger.

SACUA elects new chairman

- (Continued from Page 1)
SACUA and the Senate Assembly to
enter the University's decision-
making process at an earlier stage,
and one important way of accom-
plishing it is to get Senate Assembly
members involved.
Stebbins started implementing this
idea last year, when as SACUA's vice
chairman, he established four ad-hoc
committees in the assembly. They
deal with faculty concerns, the
University's education programs,
scholarship and research, and the
University's influence on other in-
stitutions.
THE GROUPS are currently brain-
storming over the issues and will give
reports at the Senate Assembly
meetings beginning this month. After
the proposals are voted on in the
assembly, SACUA will pass them on
to the administration and the Board of
Regents.

Calling him a "solid citizen,"
SACUA member Charles Lehmann
said Stebbins will "bring a new kind of
dynamics to (the position)."
Stebbins received impressive sup-
port from all the members of SACUA,
according to Harris McClamroch,
engineering professor and SACUA
member.
Also elected at Monday's meeting
was vice chairman Jean Loup, head of
the Documents Center and Senior
Associate Librarian at the University
Library.
Loup, who will preside over SACUA
and Assembly meetings when Steb-
bins is absent, may be the first woman
ever elected an officer of SACUA.
"IT'S ALWAYS good to me to see
women doing things that they haven't
done before, because we are perfectly
capable of doing well," she said.
In addition to new officers, SACUA
will also have three new members

who were elected at last month's
Senate Assembly meeting.
The new members are: Phillip
Margolis, professor of psychiatry and
associate chief of clinical affairs at
University Hospitals; Beth Reed,
associate professor of social work and
women's studies; and Lorraine
Nadelman, associate. professor of
psychology.
While SACUA was regrouping with
new leadership and three new mem-
bers, its goal this year will be to
establish a working relationship with
the nominee for the vice president for
academic affairs, James Duderstadt,
McClamroch said.
"Duderstadt will no doubt have new
ideas and proposals that he will bring
to his position," McClamroch said,
adding that "SACUA expects to play
an important role in representing the
faculty's interest as they relate to
those new proposals."

S 'A

L. Amerwan panel debates policy
(Continued from Page 1)

dinistas take over, they produce
massive amounts of refugees. I ask
what it would take to make you leave
your country and your roots, like the
Nicaraguans have. I take it that they
have voted with their feet," Sorzano
said.
Campbell disagreed with Sorzano,
claiming that the Sandinistas are a
government of the people.

"NORTH Americans insist on
labeling our revolution, and seem in-
tent on repeating those labels they get
comfortable with. The real culprits in
the region are the Contras, because
they are a mercenary army supported
by the U.S., and they fulfill U.S.
foreign policy objectives," Campbell
said.
Smith, although not fully embracing

the Sandinistas, said they were a
relatively democratic government
and had wide support among its own
people.
"If the Contras had the support that
the administration says they do, then
this wouldn't be just a border war. It
is not the sort of totalitarian dungeon
that the administration claims it is,"
said Smith.

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School board approves disease policy

.
M4

(Continued from Page 1)
to the superintendent, who makes the
final decision.
BECAUSE of the recent controver-
sy over whether AIDS victims should
be allowed to remain in school, some
board members felt they had to
protect themselves from potential
lawsuits. A substitute teacher who
was diagnosed as having an AIDS
related-complex has not been called
back to work, nor has he sued the
FUJI RESTAURANT
Featuring:
Chicken Teriyaki - $ 7.50
Lobster Teriyaki - $11.50
We create our own delicate
teriyaki sauce from rare oriental
spices, soy sauce and wine.
Fuji Restaurant " 327 Braun Ct. "663-3111
Across from Kerrytown

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Errol Goldman,
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proposed policy after a March 5
the board's school board meeting when board
labor relations members discussed their reser-

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