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March 31, 1986 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-31

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 31, 1986-- Page 7

YES,
YOU CAN LIVE AT:
1206 CAMBRIDGE CT.
-5 BEDROOMS
-MODERN KITCHEN
w/dishwasher
-2 NEW BATHS
-LAUNDRY FACILITIES
-FRONT PORCH
(great for parties!)
GREAT LOCATION
CALL
662-6017
No Student
Slum
4-BEDROOM HOUSE
Nicely Furnished
HILL STREET
Other great amenities:
* Free Parking
" Dishwasher
" Backyard
" Front Porch
" 5 minutes to Union
RENT NEGOTIABLE
761-1435

MAY - AUGUST
SUBLET
SPACIOUS
7-BEDROOM HOUSE
" Located 5 minutes
from diag. 3 minutes
from B-School
" Washer /dryer in
basement
" Reasonably Priced
* 720 Arbor
CALL
761-6408

EffiCIENCY
MAY-AUG.
Furnished, Carpeting,
Laundry, Utilities
included, except for
phone & electricity.
$225 /month
307 THOMPSON
APT. 204
994-8617
R1LEEL
3 BEDROOM
" Available Spring/
Summer
" Plenty of room
for 5
* Mocrowave, A/C,
Balcony
" 1 Minute from B-school
and Law school
" 911 Oakland,
Apt. No. 6
663-2346
" $550/mo. Negotiable
SPACIOUS
HOUSE
Spring /Summer Sublet
Very reasonable Rent,
4 large bedrooms,
Great location
(2 blocks from Charlies)
Full kitchen, 2 bathrooms,
front porch and
lawn for tanning,
GOOD FOR PARTIES!!!
If interested, Call
Alec
Dan
Mitch 665-4722
Greg
SUBLET
1 BEDROOM 2 PERSON
APT. IN HOUSE
5 min. from campus
Furnished, Lots of
Windows with
all utilities included,
many extras.
$200/month
Negotiable
CALL
994-0365

SUBLET
Ho etl Living
" 5 Bedroom
" 2 '/2 baths
" newly redecorated
"-laundry facilities
" cable
" private parking
. screen enclosed
porch
" dishwasher
* ultra-modern kitchen
523S5. FOURTH
price negotiable
CALL:
764-4963,
764-9 701
or 764-4925
SPRING /SUMMER
SUBIET
Forest Post Apts.
PREMIUM LOCATION
S. FOREST & HILL

Sublet
Available
MAY-AUG.
1 bedroom in a 4-
bedroom bi-level.
Rent will include
heat, water, dish-
washer. Laundry
facilities next door.
Convenient to Frieze
and Rackham.
PRICE NEGOTIABLE
663-2386

r

MAY-AUG.
et
3 bdrm., bi-level
on Oakland
AIR, PARKING
668-7816
after 5

Excellent Summer
Loeation on S. State
NEEDING 2 MORE
ROOMMATES
right next to
Campus Corner and
other stores.
Reasonable Rent
negotiable which includes
HOT AND COLD WATER,
AIR CONDITIONING.
Call Rob or Eric At
761-5556
For information
or appointments.
Spacious
Efficiency
* separate kitchen
" high ceiling
" lots of windows
" quiet and sunny
" bathtub w/feet!
" great for couple
" price negotiable
only one minute
from Union
CALL NOW
LOU
663-4708
SUMMER
SUBLET
HERITAGE HOUSE
APARTMENTS
" 2 Bedrooms
" Fully Furnished
" Air Conditioning
" 2 Balconies
* Dishwasher
" Washer/Dryer
" Carpeting
CALL STEPHANIE
763-2881
AUDREY
764-3853
SPRING /SUMMER
SUBILET
Large, Fully Furnished
4 Bedroom Apt.
Available
LOTS OF EXTRAS!
RENT NEGOTIABLE
CALL
764-9775

SPRING /SUMMER
SUBLET
HUGE 4 BEDROOM
BI-LEVEL HOUSE

BEST LOCATION.
Church Street
Beautiful two bedroom
APARTMENT
Close to.
B-School, Law-School, V.C.
Rick's, Charlies
INCLUDES:
Air Conditioning
Cable Ready
Good Security
Laundry
New Furniture
RENT IS NEGOTIABLE
711 Church
996-2641
North
Campus
Furnished Bedroom
In Comfortable
Huron Towers Apt.
SPRING SUMMER
OR MAY TO MAY
" Discounted Monthly Rent
" A/C, Free Parking and Pool
" Share Kitchen, Bath and
Thirty Foot Balcony
CALL
936-0231 WEEKDAYS
663-2041 EVENINGS
Spacious 6
Room House
PERFECT LOCATION
ON
CENTRAL CAMPUS
" Large Kitchen
420 S. DIVISION
CALL ANDY
761-7463
GREAT
Summer Sublet
WILLOW TREE
TOWERS
June 1- August 31
* 2 Bedroom, Lakefront Apt.
" Furnished w/couch, loveseat,
kitchen table, living room
table, queen size bed
" Swimming pool
" Tennis Courts
" Free Parking
" Just a short walk from Free
University Bus Service.
" $485 Monthly
994-5088

SPRING-SUMMER
SUBLET
1320 S. Univ., No. 24
PARK PLAZA
1 bedroom, fully
furn. With air cond.
and extra large second
floor balcony.
Room for 2-3 people
Only 2 min.from campus.
RENT NEG.
Call
761-1308
MAY-AUG.
ALBERT TERRACE
1700 GEDDES

Spring break riots
end in, California

(Continued from Page 1)
subtenant and the landlord because landlords hold
tenants responsible for any damage or unpaid rent
during the summer.
Subtenants are "less likely to pay the rent and
more likely to cause damange," said Rumsey.
"From the landlord's point of view, he's already
got someone to go after, and that is the original
leaseholder."
Eric Lipson, an attorney for Student Legal Ser-
vices, said he has seen cases when either the
prime tenant or the subtenant-sometimes
both- fail to pay the entire month's rent.
"WE OFTEN see cases where a subtenant is
paying his portion of the rent to the prime tenant,
but the prime tenant is not paying his share to the
landlord," Lipson said.
In other cases, the subletter simply doesn't pay
his portion of th erent, and the landlord sues the
prime tenant. "The answer to these things is to
know who you are dealing with," Lipson said.
Rumsey recommends that tenants get
agreements in writing from their subletters,
although verbal agreements can be legally bin-
ding too. Students should also use an inventory
checklist and get a security deposit for up to 1':,
months rent, Rumsey said.

SOME CONTRACTS give landlords the right to
meet and approve any subletter, although they
cannot withhold approval unreasonably, Rumsey
said. Sublets are rented out at 50 to 75 percent of the
original rent, but prime tenants are still respon-
sible for making sure the landlord receives all
rent.
Rumsey added that it is important for prime
tenants to keep checking throughout the summer
to make sure that the rent and utilities are being
paid.
Ann Crowell of Spears and Woltersom realtors;
said her company does not screen subletters, but it
does ask for a copy of an inventory checklist.
Melanie Preston of Campus Management said
tenants should collect a security deposit and check
references because students are eager to find
subletters and "that's when the student gets_
stung. We check references. They should too."
Lipson suggests that students ask their landlor-
ds for an "assignment," which transfers all'
obligations to the subletter, rather than a
sublease.
Some landlords have assignments as a matter of
course, Lipson said, while others prefer subleases
so they don't have to conduct another credit check
on the subletter.

PALM SPRINGS, Calif. (AP) - Crowds of
restless students continued to roam this chic desert
resort yesterday, but many young people prepared
to return to school after a weekend of sometimes
violent spring revelry.
Police said the atmosphere was subdued com-
pared with Friday's rampage by beer-guzzling
youths who threw rocks and bottles and tore
clothing off women. "It appears today that
everyone is recuperating, laying around the parks a
and hotel pools," said police Sgt. David Goodwin.
Palm Springs, 110 miles east of Los Angeles, has
long been a popular spot for high school and college
students during spring break and this year an
estimated 10,000 converged on the city.

DeVarti fills up potholes

(Continued from Page 1)
DeVarti and Tom Marx, a
University student in the School
of Education, manned the
shovels and brooms and filled
the potholes. Rackham student
Ellen Rabinowitz drove the
light blue Ford pickup truck
that contained the equipment,
while LSA junior Sabra Brierea
and Social Work graduate
student Janny Huisman con-
trolled traffic with bright
orange flags.
Meanwhile, Ann Arbor
Resident Tim Kunin went from
house to house passing out
DeVarti campaign literature.
USING HALF a ton of gravel
that they purchased for $20-25
dollars, construction equipment
rented from. local manufac-
turers, and brooms provided by
Dominick's, the patrollers were
able to keep their cost below
$100 for their day on the streets.
Despite their efforts,
however, DeVarti does not feel
that Saturday's endeavor will
provide a long-term solution to

Ann Arbor's pothole problem.
"We need complete recon-
struction from the base up and
an ongoing maintenance
program," DeVarti said. He
also cited elimination of the
city's drainage problem, as well
as the use of a new type of
asphalt known as seal coating, a
thin layer of asphalt with gravel
that constantly renews road
surface.
DeVarti said he intends to "go
a long way into making potholes
not as severe a problem."
VOLUNTEER Tim Kunin
sees the pothole patrol as "an
attempt to dramatize the
pothole problem. It's not a
solution because it just isn't
cost effective to patch up
potholes once every year."
Ann Arbor Director of Tran-
sportation John Robbins con-
firmed that potholes pose a
major problem to city main-
tenance crewstparticularly in
the spring months.
The potholes result from a
combination of rain and melting
snow that causes the clay base

of city roads to expand,'
creating cracks that eventually
develop into fissures in the:
streets.
ROBBINS attributes the road
problems to outdated construc-
tion material and a shortage of
city funding.
The city currently spends
about $650,000 annually on road
maintenance, Robbins said, a
figure he considers insufficient.
He urged city officials to con-
sider allocating more funds, but
would not estimate how much
more money is needed.
Because of this low funding,
Robbins said the numbers of
city workers fixing the roads
has been cut from 44 to 16 since
1969. Crews today work 10-hour
shifts.
Although DeVarti's crew only
worked four hours on Saturday,
group volunteers appeared
tired yet pleased with their ac-
complishments.
Said volunteer Sabra Briere:
"It was really quite an ex-
perience. I've got blisters, but I
was happy to help Dave."

Goodwin said police made 95 arrests from 7 a.m.
Saturday to 7 a.m. Sunday, mostly for public
drunkenness. Since March 21, officers had made 528
arrests, including 203 for public drunkenness, 18 for
battery and 14 for resisting arrest.
Last year, Goodwin said, police reported a total of
347 arrests during the weeklong Easter break, and
almost half of those were curfew violations.
There were no major outbreaks of chaos after
Friday's near-riot. Officers called for reinfor-
cements from nearby jurisdictions and used high-
visibility foot and car patrols to put a damper on
student exuberance.
An estimated 200 officers were kept in town
Saturday, Goodwin said.

Tenants look for subletters
for spring-summer leases

Students call Prof. unfair

SUBLT
AVAIIABLE
MAY thru AUG.
-Large efficiency
-E. Ann-
CLOSE TO CAMPUS
-Rent Negotiable
-offstreet Parking
-Furnished
-pets welcome
-Laundry facilities
CALL KRISTIN
996-1685
In the evenings
SPRING /SUMMER
SUBLET
LARGE BI-LEVEL APT.
(2 males needed)

(Continued from Page1)
the audience, reprimanding him for reading a
newspaper in class, and ending the discussion by
dismissing the class.
One Residential College junior in the class said,
"He made a big, big scene out of it. He singled the
guy out. Nobody needs to go to class to get
patronized."
The letter was signed by just under half the
class of 180 last Thursday, when Tanter was out of
town. It was drafted by LSA junior Jeffrey Per-
sson, LSA sophomore Richard Meints, and senior
Hassan Basha, with input from other students.
The letter also mentioned an incident that oc-
curred on March 20, when Tanter allegedly told

students who had not purchased a supplementary
coursepack that they should leave the lecture.
"Because of his inflexibility, the lecture hour was
wasted for all but a handful of the class when he
refused to work around the problem."
Although the majority of the students who were
at lecture last Thursday signed the letter, some
called the complaints unfounded. "There is a lot of
balance throughout the course," said Patrick
Palis, an LSA junior. "Tanter has been very fair."
Denis Sullivan, the admnistrative assistant in
charge of the teaching assistants in the course,
said he thinks the matter should be handled inter-
nally. "Every class has problems," he said.
"Maybe this has more than usual."

Shultz decries public diplomacy

WASHINGTON (AP) - Secretary of State
George Schultz said yesterday the U.S.-Soviet
stalemate on arms control will continue unless the
two sides resume the kind of private diplomacy
that led to last year's summit in Geneva.
"Until that happens, we're not going to get
anywhere," Shultz told reporters on a flight from
Rome to Washington.
Shultz arrived at Andrews Air Force Base out-
side Washington yesterday evening after a 10-day
trip to France, Turkey, Greece and Italy, where
he sought allied support for the United States' an-
ti-terrorism efforts.
Shultz's remarks were sparked by Soviet leader
Mikhail Gorbachev's announcement Saturday
that he was prepared to meet Reagan in western

Europe to discuss a ban on nuclear weapons tests.
Reagan has repeatedly rejected a test-ban
proposal on grounds the U.S. lags behind the
Soviet Union on testing and needs to catch up.
Shultz repeated the U.S. rejection of the latest-
offer and said Reagan is still seeking a summit in
the United States, not just on testing but on the
broad range of superpower issues.
He complained that both sides' proposals on
weapons reduction have been aired publicly
rather than in a secret atmosphere conducive to
making progress.
Shultz said he wanted "to get somewhere in our
relationship with the Soviets where we're able to
have some discussions that are relatively quiet
and direct.

E

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