100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 26, 1986 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

ARTS

The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, March 26, 1986

Page 5

New World:

Old appeal

By Debra Shreve
IT has been said that a good string
quartet player is the musician's
musician, since the delicate art of
quartet playing requires that each
member displays the highest degree
of individual excellence, as well as a
sophisticated ability to fuse himself
into the unity of the group. This latter
phenomenon, the unity of the group,
comes only when a particular set of
four musicians has played and per-
formed together over a period of
time; they have become sensitive to
one another's styles, and found a way
to mold these individual styles into a
dynamic whole.
In their third season now with the
same personnel - Curtis Macomber
and Vahn Armstrong, violins; Robert
Dan, viola; and Ross Harbaugh, cello
- it was clear from Monday night's
performance that the New World
String Quarter has reached this level
of maturity as a group.
Performing to a sparse crowd in
Rackham Auditorium, the New World

String Quartet offered a program of
standard quartet repetoire as the
third and last concert for this season
in their "quartet-in-residence" series
at the University. After a day of
giving master classes and coaching
student quartets at the School of
Music, the quartet settled down in the
evening to perform works by Mozart,
Verdi, and Beethoven.
Opening the program with Mozart's
Quartet in A Major (K.464), gave the
quartet ample opportunity to excer-
cise their new maturity, Mozart's
works being always a merciless
challenge to the harmonic balance of
the group. Particularly in the Meneut-
to movement, where brief motifs are
passed around alternatively in unison,
duets, and solos, all in a quick tempo,
the quartet met the demands of the
piece beautifully, never faltering
musically or visually in their very
pleasing interpretation.
The Verdi Quartet in E Minor
represented the more unusual
category in string quartet repetoire.
The only string quarter composed by
this very popular opera composer,

this is a late work, and quite delight-
fully exhibits the composer's accom-
plished operatic style. It seems, in
fact, that Verdi managed to tran-
smute the standard features of
operatic drama into the string quartet
medium, filling the work with the
sticky-sweet romantic splendor of
solo arias, often shifting abruptly into
passages in which the four voices
more upward together in a flam-
boyantly passionate crescendo. The
quartet carried all this off with just
the right dose of melodrama, clearly
enjoying themselves in the process.
Probably the most complex and in-
tense work on the program was the C
Sharp Minor Quartet by Beethoven
(opus 131). In this work, composed in
1826, ( a year before Beethoven's
death), Beethoven ventured out of the
standard four-movement quartet
form and forged together a unified
work of seven sections. The ex-
periment, apparently, was successful,
since Beethoven considered this his
greatest quartet, and many now con-
sider it one of the greatest by any

composer. One can recognize many
of Beethoven's moods in this piece:
the urgent vigor of the Presto
movement, the intense pathos of
the Adagio, as well as frequent instan-
ces of Beethovian humor, which the
quartet executed with lively effec-
tiveness. The quartet maintained
their concentration throughout this
long and difficult work, reaching
several brief but exquisite moments,
and achieving overall an excellent
perfromance.
It is not difficult to understand why
this Grand Rapids-based group has
been receiving national recognition
and critical acclaim in the toughest
arenas of chamber performance. Af-
ter several troubled years, during
which the New World underwent three
successive changes in personnel
(Ross Harbaugh is the only original
member), it appears the New World
Quartet has now discovered a com-
bination of personalities and in-
dividual musical excellence which
they can mold into an outstanding
unity.

Company delivers stylish flair

By Malia Frey
T HE most unfortunate thing about
Monday's Bella Lewitzky concert
Was that not enough people were there
to see it. The Los Angeles-based Bella
Lewitzky Dance Company performed
their first Ann Arbor concert to a
barely half-full Power Center audien-
ce. Nevertheless, it was an excellent
show.
Costumes by Rudi Gernreich made
"Inscape" an intriguing piece.
Designer Gernreich created fantastic
headgear for one pair of dancers that
connected them at the head. The
result was hilarious. Dancers Ken-
neth Talley and John Pennington, who
wore the headpiece, fought from one
end of the stage to the other trying to
free themselves from their connec-
tedness.
Similar costumes dancers were
connected from hip to knee, instead of
at the head. Lewitzky's amusing

choreography was expertly perfor-
med by each enthusiatic duet.
Audience and dancers alike laughed
throughout the entire piece.
During one segment of the piece,
dancers wore unitards with one leg
and one arm cut out. These costumes,
along with intricate lighting patterns,
made the dancers bodies seem
strangely contorted while they danced
to the sounds of crying babies,
whispering voices and footsteps.
Throughout Lewitzky's concert, her
choreography focused on the
sometimes emotional, but usually
playful interaction between dancers.
In "Continuum," and "Inscape" the
focus was on duets. But in "Game
Plan' the interaction was throughout
the entire cast. The players in
"Game Plan" danced to carefully
constructed game rules which gover-
ned entering and exiting the game.
Players would call out one of five
movement patterns which the dan-
cers would perform until one dancer

broke a rule.
The endurance of the dancers was
remarkable. They remained as en-

thusiastic in this, Lewitzky's last
piece, as they did in "Inscape,"
Lewitzky's first.

Violinist Ruggiero Ricci will perform tonight at Rackham Auditorium.
The performance will be at 8 p.m. Mr. Ricci is an Ann Arbor resident and
teaches at U-M School of Music.

i.,.
Shov
Mid

POE

SI

w how you feel with ...
higan Daily Personals
764-0557

A

TED

Major anthology now seeks poems: love, nature, haiku,
song lyrics, reflective, free verse, religious - all types!
Beginners are welcome! Our editors will reply within 7 days.
Send ONE POEM ONLY, 21 lines or less, to:
WORLD OF POETRY PRESS
Dept. AP " 2431 Stockton Blvd. a Sacramento, Calif. 95817

says VOTE TODAY in the MSA ELECTION
to PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS
C FISHBOWL 9 AM-4 PM; MLB 9 AM-2 PM; MICHIGAN UNION (MUG) 11 AM-2 PM;
UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY 7 PM-9 PM; LAW SCHOOL, rm 100 1:30 PM-4:30 PM;
EAST ENGINEERING 9 AM-2 PM; FRIEZE 11 AM-1 PM; BUSINESS (lounge) 11 AM-2 PM;
DOW 9 AM-2 PM; MARKLEY 4:30 PM-B PM; ALICE LLOYD 4:30 PM-5:30 PM;
WEST QUAD 11:30 AM-1:30 PM; PUBLIC HEALTH 11 AM-2 PM; DENNISON 11 AM-1 PM;
ART 10 AM-2 PM; MED. LIBRARY 11 AM-2 PM
endorses the STUDENT RIGHTS PARTY
* Student Rights says No Compromise Code!
" Only Student Rights can be trusted to protect student rights
" Student Rights has the most experience fighting the code
" Student Rights best understands the code issue
says VOTE YES on BALLOT A
Should any code of non-academic conduct be approved by a vote of the
student body prior to ratification by the Michigan Student Assembly?
" YES on BALLOT A prevents the Meadow Party and Indispensable Party

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan