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March 26, 1986 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-26

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The Michigan Daily - Wednesday, March 26, 1986- Page 3
AISA officials optimistic for high voter turnout
By MARY CHRIS JAKLEVIC plications. Election Director Marci Higer said candidates were outside cam- DESPITE much of the mudslinging County comic strip character. bu

t

Despite some last-minute problems,
Michigan Student Assembly election
officials espect a high turnout at this
year's election, which began yester-
day.
They say this year's students are
better informed about the assembly,
since the candidates have publicized
their campaigns extensively and
more students have been reading
about MSA activities owing to the
Daily's increased circulation.
LAST YEAR about 6000 students,
one fifth of the student population,
voted in the MSA elections. It was the
highest turnout in recent years.
This year MSA has tried to set up
more diverse polling sites - including
the Frieze Building, the Law School,
and University Towers.
But the attempt to make voting
more convenient has run into com-

MSA intended to place a polling site
in the basement of the Law Library
last night but was told by Law School
officials yesterday after the site was
publicized that they would not be able
to do so. To make up for the can-
cellation, a new site outside room 100
in the Law Quad will be open from
8:30 a.m. until 4:30 p.m. today.
STAFFING shortages forced the
late opening of the Union polling site
last night, and the cancellation of a
site in the School of Public Health
planned for today.
The house of the Union site for today
have been changed from the after-
noon until the evening although an
exact time was not available at press
time.
The last poll, at the Undergraduate
Library, will close tonight at nine
p.m.

the shortagees are partly owing to the
volunteer status election workers. In
past years, poll workers were paid.
ONE unexpected success was the
last-minute opening of a polling site
on theDiag which drew many of the
throngs of students who were outside
enjoying yesterday's sunshine. Higer
said there will be another poll on the
Diag today if there are volunteers to
staff it.
She said she thought the sunny day
may have attractred some people to
vote, especially since many of the

paigning.
Another change in this year's elec-
tions is that poll workers have been
instructed to ask students passing by
if they want to vote, which Higer said
may encourage more students to vote.
"Some people are shy and need to
be asked," Higer said.
Many students yesterday said they
were voting because they knew people
who were running, or were concerned
about a particular issue, such as the
code.

that has marked this year's cam-
paigning, many of the students voting
were unfamiliar with the issues.
"I think it's an inevitable part of
any political process, but as an infor-
med voter it's the kind of thing you
ignore," said LSA freshman James
Wittenbach.
Wittenbach, who voted for several
Meadow party candidates, said he
was at first turned off by the party's
use of Opus in its campaign, a Bloom

decided to vote for Meadow after he
had heard their campaign platform.
LSA junior Patty Chin and Molly
Morris said they were swayed to vote
for the Student Rights presidential
and vice presidential candidates after
reading a letter posted by MSA
representatives Tom Marx and
Daniel Melendez-Alvira, which
criticized Meadow party candidate
Kurt Muenchow's attendance record
as the head of the MSA Budget"
Priorities Committee.

MSA censures Muenchow and Thompson

I

I

What's happening
around Ann Arbor

By WENDY SHARP
The Michigan Student Assembly
went into executive session last night
and passed a resolution demanding
that Meadow party candidates Kurt
Muenchow and Darrell Thompson
apologize for signing a statement
urging their Student Rights opponents
to elaborate on their alleged member-
ship in a "Marxist Group."
The statement, which requested
that all candidates disclose their
"political orientation," was also
signed by members from the
Indispensable Party, which is running
Mark Soble, as its presidential can-
didate and Marc Strecker for vice-
president.
THE resolutin passed with thirteen
yes votes, four no votes, and one ab-
stention.
Muenchow and Thompson respon-

ded by signing a public apology for
their resoluti. .nand "for any
detrimental repercussions resulting
therefrom."
A poster linxing some Student
Rights party members with the
Marxist Group fueled more con-
troversy yesterday.
THE POSTER which was seen on
campus as early as eight a.m. yester-
day morning, was posted in the East
Engineering Building, the UGLi, the
Dow Building, and on kioskes in the
central campus area.
The poster read "What you should
know about the Student Rights Party,
But weren't told," and described
Faigel and Wesibrot's alleged
Marxist connections. The bottom of
the poster said "A public service
message by Students Proud of Cam-
pus Knowledge" (SPOCK).
Eric Shapiro, president of SPOCK,

a group against banning technology at
the University, said he designed most
of the posters because "students have
a right to know who they're voting
for.
MSA also passed a resolution last
night to investigate SPOCK.
MUENCHOW denied any in-
volvement with the posters. "I have
nothing to do with it," he said. He ad-
ded that he told all Meadow party
members at a party meeting last
week not to put up posters not seen by
him or his campaign manager.
The poster was declared illegal
yesterday by Marci Higer, MSA Elec-
tions Director and Richard Layman,
an administrative assistant.
The poster was declared illegal
yesterday by Marci Higer, MSA Elec-
tions Director, and Richard Layman,
an administrative assistant. Layman
said the poster was illegal because

"the poster used MSA resources
which was against the constitution
regulations."MSA ordered that the
posters be taken down to protect the
people listed on the form who are not
members of the Student Rights Party.
Even though members of the
Student Rights Party feel that the
Meadow Party is involved with the
posters. Leela Fernandes, a Students
Rights Party member running for
engineering representative, said
Meadow Party member Dave Vogel
taped a poster to the sidewalk and
then proceeded to block Fernandes's
way when she tried to take the poster
down.
Vogel denied the accusation and
said, "I never put any up myself." He
would not comment on whether people
he knew in the party put up posters or
whether the Meadow Party was in-
volved.

4

Campus Cinema
FROM HERE TO ETERNITY (Fred
Zinneman, 1953) Hill St., 8 p.m., 1429
Hill St.
Montgomery Clift and Frank
Sinatra star in this Academy-Award
winning classic.
THE SPY WHO LOVED ME (L.
Gilbert, 1977) MTF, 7 p.m.,
Michigan Theater.
Roger Moore stars as 007.
Catherine Bach stars as window
dressing. Richard Kiel cameos as
Jaws.
FOR YOUR EYES ONLY (John
Glenn, 1981) MTF, 9:15 p.m.,
Michigan Theater
Roger Moore again stars as 007,
out to save the world from certain
destruction.
Performances
RUGGIERO RICCI - University
Musical Society, 8 p.m., Rackham
Auditorium (665-3717).
A nationally-acclaimed violinist,
Ricci, will perform various works
including Beethoven's Sonata in G
Major, Op. 96, Bach's Sonata in C
Major, and Ernst's caprice The Last
Rose of Summer.
Bars and Clubs
THE ARK (761-1451) - Boys of the
Lough, folk.
BIRDS OF PARADISE (662-8310) -
Ron Brooks Trio, jazz.
THE BLIND PIG (996-8555) -
Makah Rhythm Tribe, reggae.
THE EARLE(994-0211) - Larry
Manderville, solo pianist.
MR. FLOOD'S PARTY (995-2132) -
Jeanne and the Dreams, R&B.
MOUNTAIN JACK'S (665-1133) -
Billy Alberts, easy listening.
THE NECTARINE BALLROOM
(994-5436) - Dollar Night Dance
Party, DJ the Wizard.
U-CLUB (763-2236) - Laugh Track.
Speakers
PETER WILES - "New Light on
Soviet Military Finance," Russian
and East European Studies, noon,
Commons Room, Lane Hall.
SEXUAL ABUSE - Impact on
Families and Communities -
Hospital Social Work staff, 3 p.m..
Level #1/Room H203, Hospital
HERMAN MERTE - "A Simple
Model for Heat Transfer With Drop-
wise Condensation," Mechanical
Engineering/Applied Mechanics, 4
p.m., 2281 G.G. Brown.
RAYMOND PLAUT - "Large
Scale Oscillations and Chaos in
Some Structural Models,"
Aerospace Engineering, 4 p.m., 1014
Dow Bldg.
BARRY NELSON - "The Effect
of Batch Size on Variance Reduc-
tions via Control Variants," In-
dustrial and Operations
Engineering, 4 p.m., 1014 Dow Bldg.
DAVID RAULET - "T Cell On-
togeny and Specificity: Studies of T
Cell Receptor Gene Expression and
Rearrangement," Biology, 4 pm.,
3011 Natural Science Bldg.
DAVID GORDON, MAHMOOD
MAMDANI - "America's Role in
Africa," International Development
forum, 7:30 p.m., International Cen-
ter.
BETSY KIRKPATRICK -
"Competition Among Bryophytes:
Propagules vs. Adults," Botany,
noon, 1139 Natural Science Bldg.
NAM-SOO LEE - "Surface-
Enhanced Raman Scattering of
Flavins and Flavoproteins,"
Chemistry, 4 p.m., 1300 Chemistry

World Markets and Peasant Sub-
sistence," Natural Resources, noon,
1036 Dana Hall.
JOHN VAN DUEREN -
"Auditing in Los Angeles: The
Mystique and the Reality," Business
Administration, 4:15 p.m., Michigan
Room, Business Administration
Bldg.
KATHLEEN SUSAN QUINN -
"Self Evaluation and Spouse
Evaluation of Hearing Impairment
and Hearing Handicap in a Sample
of Older People," School of
Education, 2 p.m., 1350 School of
Education Bldg.
MEHMET YILDIZ - "A Ten-
tative General Theory for Ad-
ministrative Behavior in
Organizations," School of
Education, noon, 4003 School of
Education Bldg.
ALFRED STOREY - "Speaking
Skills," CRLT, 7 p.m., 109 E.
Madison.
ROBERT KELLEY - Biology,
12:05 p.m., 5732 Medical Science II
Bldg.
Meetings
MENSA - 7 p.m., Paesano's, 3411
Washtenaw.
BAHAI CLUB - 5:30 p.m.,
Lounge, International Center.
LATIN AMERICAN
SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE - 8
p.m., Kuenzel Room, Union.
ARCHERY CLUB - 8 p.m.,
Coliseum.
TAKE BACK THE NIGHT MAR-
CH AND RALLY
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
7:30p.m., Fire Department.
ROCKCLIMBING TRIP
MEETING - Recreational Sports, 7
p.m., NCRB.
DISSERTATION SUPPORT
GROUP -8:30 a.m., 3100 Union.
ENSIAN YEARBOOK - 7 p.m.,
Student Publications Bldg.
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB -
Stilyagi Air Corps, 8:15 p.m.,
League.
MICHIGAN GAY UNION -. 9
p.m., 802 Monroe.
Furthermore
Women's Rugby Practice - Colis-
eum, 8p.m.
GRAPHICS PROGRAMMING
WITH DI-3000 - Computing course,
7 p.m., 1013 NUBS.
PRODUCING A RACKHAM
DISSERTATION WITH TEXTEDIT
.- Computing course, 8 p.m., 101?
NUBS.
WORKING WITH MAGNETIC
TAPES - Computing course, 7 p.m.,
1013 NUBS.
FINDING A SUMMER JOB:
STRATEGIES FOR THE
PROSCRATINATOR - Career
Planning& Placement program,
12:10 p.m., Student Activities Bldg.
ON-CAMPUS RECRUITING
DISCUSSION - Career Planning &
Placement program, 4:10 p.m.,
Student Activities Bldg.
TUTORING IN MATH, SCIENCE
AND ENGINEERING - Tau Beta
Pi, 7 p.m., 307 Undergraduate
Library; 8 p.m., 2332 Bursley Hall; 7
p.m., Red Carpet Annex, Alice
Lloyd.
dBASE III, PART II -
Microcomputer Education
workshop, 8:30 a.m., 3001 School of
Education Bldg.
MACINTOSH: DISK AND FILE
MANAGEMENT - Microcomputer
Education workshop, 10:30 a.m.,
3001 School of Education Bldg.
GIVING AND RECIEVING
FEEDBACK - HRD workshop, 8:30
a.m.
TAE KWON DO PRACTICE - 6

Football and basketball ticket prices rise

(Continued from Page 1)

BASKETBALL is facing similar
problems. Lorimar Productions,
which agreed to a three-year $4
million deal, failed to sell enough ad-
vertising space and has since disban-
ded its sports programming
operations.
The Lorimar problems marked the
second straight year that a network
defaulted on the conference. Last
year the conference lost $5 million
when two separate companies went
bankrupt in the middle of the basket-
ball season.

In an effort to prevent the recurren-
ce of such problems the athletic
directors have taken power from the
conference's hierarchy. In the future,
television contracts must be approved
by a majority of the directors.
IN ANOTHER move, the conferen-
ce hired William Rasmussen, the
founder of the all-sports cable chan-
nel, ESPN to supervise and negotiate
all television contracts.
Canham said Rasmussen will put
the Big Ten on the right road, but that
the next year will be a difficult one
because the networks have most of
their time slots filled already. He

predicted that Rasmussen will be able
to negotiate a favorable settlement
with CBS for college football because
he said, "our ratings were higher than
ABC's last year."
In addition to the pending deal with
CBS, the conference has already
signed a contract to broadcast games
over the Turner Broadcasting System
and is negotiating a deal with USA
cable network. CBS and NBC are also
committed to limited weekend
coverage.
ALTHOUGH the conference suf-
fered a big loss over the Lorimar
default, it partly recouped by earning

$320,000 in post season money -te
University's share being $200,000.
Canham said he could put Michigan
on television 20 times a season if he
wanted but didn't want to overexpose
the basketball team.
Canham said the American public
can expect to see a continued flood of
college, basketball games on
television because the costs for the
rights to the games have dwindled so
much over the past few years that
networks only need a small rating to
make a profit. "And they are all
making money," he added.

U.S. continues attacks

ARIEL
RESTAURANT
& DELI

against Libyan
(Continued from Page 1) reprisal
The U
"possibly up to 12 total." Monday
Speakes also said that although the Libya's
missile-guidance radar was knocked sending
out by radar-chasing missiles on waters.
Monday, the Libyans probably had In Wa
multiple radars used to aim their ficials s
missiles from the site because the boats h
fleet detected renewed radar signals fired by
during the night before ordering a and yes
renewed attack. and two
There was no official U.S. They
assessment of Libyan casualties and again ye
officials said they did not believe any aircraf
Soviets were at the SAM-5 missile Libya's
launch site near Sirte that was which w
knocked out of action when American
jets destroyed its radar.
Thousands of Libyans rallied in
Tripoli yesterday to declare a "holy
war" against the United States, and
Libya called for death for American
consultants "spying" in the Middle
East, reports from the Libyan capital
said.
A DIPLOMAT in Tripoli said no
threats had been made against the
few Americans believed still in the
North African nation, now in the
second day of a military confrontation
with the United States.
Khadafy replied defiantly to U.S.
statements that the American 6th
Fleet naval maneuvers off Libya
would continue until Sunday.
"We also declare that our brave
confrontation wl lalso continue and
that the Jamahiriya (Libya) is not
only defending itself at this mome t,
but the entire Arab nation and its
future," Khadafy was quoted as
saying in a dispatch of the official
Libyan news agency JANA,
monitored in Rome.
THE LIBYAN and news media also
reported that Syrian and Sudanese of-
ficials arrived in Tripoli yesterday for
consultations with Libyan officials.
And a hard-line Palestinian guerrilla
front vowed to attack American
targets throughout the Middle East in

targets
for U.S. "aggression."
U.S.-Libyan clashes broke out
as the 6th Fleet challenged
claim to the Gulf of Sidra by
aircraft over the disputed
ashington yesterday, U.S. of-
aid at least four Libyan patrol
ad been struck by missiles
U.S. Navy warplanes Monday
terday. Two boats were sunk
were damaged, they said.
said U.S. planes also struck
esterday at a Soviet-built anti-
t missile site at Sirte on
s Mediterranean shoreline,
was reported damaged.

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BREAKFAST
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2 eggs, hashbrowns, & toast
$1.49
Plain omelette with toast
$1.49
BUFFET STARTS
AT 3:00 p.m.

WE SELL
BEER & WINE

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1/2 price 39C/gal.

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