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March 25, 1986 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-25

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The Michigan Daily - Tuesday, March 25, 1986 Page 5

SCIENCE

Computer service makes research accessible

By ADAM CORT
Pinpointing a researcher working
on a particular project can be
a monumental task at the University,
but a computer service can facilitate
the task.
The Stanford Computing Infor-
mation Profile Technique (SCRIPT)
stores extensive lists of information
on researchers and their projects.
THE PROGRAM, currently holding
information on 2,300 faculty and
researchers at the Ann Arbor, Dear-
born, and Flint campuses, as well as
the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit
can be accessed by students and
faculty on the Michigan Termal

System free of charge. Business
people looking for consultants pay a
$12 fee.
SCRIPT, modeled after a system at
Stanford University, has been revam-
ped and is now being sold to other in-
stitutions, said Elaine Zimmerman,
coordinator and director of the
SCRIPT system.
Information can be accessed by
name, professional identification,
research objectives, publications, in-
terests, or combinations of infor-
mation, said Mary Sue Compton a
SCRIPT staffer. This makes the
sytem flexible, she said.
ZIMMERMAN said that the system

is useful in many instances. Students
can use SCRIPT to locate faculty for
study reference sources, doctoral
committees, or possible employment,
faculty and find colleagues with
similar interests, and business can
use the system to find consultants or
speakers, said Zimmerman.
The SCRIPT system facilitates
searching for information and is a
valuable asset to the University, said
Zimmerman, "People would be
making a lot of phone calls and not
getting in contact with a lot of the
right people in many cases without
it," she said.
It is particularly important in tap-

ping resources that would not other-
wise be used, said Zimmerman. Other
universities publish annual lists, but
SCRIPT is continually updated.
SCRIPT users agree that the ser-
vice is valuable.
Larry Crocket, director of special
projects at The Institute of Science
and Technology requested several
searches and called SCRIPT a
"major asset" to the University and

the business community.
Crocket, a former president of the
National Association of Management
and Technical Assistance Centers, a
position in which he conducted sear-
ches in several Universities, said fin-
ding information on faculty and
research is easiest with SCRIPT.
"This is defintely the leading system
in the country, he said.
Three years ago, the Illinois

Resource Network, a consortium of
eight universities in that state licen
sed the SCRIPT system to orgnaizf
their information, said Zimmerman.
Zimmerman predicted more
universities will acquire the system in
the future. "In many states there is a
great deal of interest in technology
transfers-they're finding they want
access to the informatino in theit
universities," she said.

Panel seeks U.S. lunar base by 2005

Shapiro recommends
enin. dean for VP

(Continued from Page 1)
the mouthpiece of the students and
would not utilize MSA's input.
In addition, Josephson said, "Many
faculty and administrators are less
than thrilled" with the recommen-
Duderstadt
would affect
'U' direction
(Continued from Page 1)
ces of funding.
THE NEW vice president for
academic affairs will be instrumental
in finding new sources of funding,
Shapiro said in December. The task,
however, will involve more than just
budget cuts. For example, Frye said,
more important programs could
receive larger annual funding while
less important programs could
receive smaller annual increases.
Duderstadt would decide which
programs took funding priority.
y "Mainly, he'll have to find a way to
stretch the University's resources to
meet its ever-growing needs," Frye
said.
Robert Green, chairman of the
faculty's Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs and a member
of the committee that recommended .
"Duderstadt and two other candidates
to Shapiro, agreed that finding more
money will be an important role of the
new vice president.
"VICE PRESIDENT Frye has told
us that we're still in for some hard
budget times," Green said.
The vice president, Green said, does
not actually decide what direction the
-University should take, but is respon-
~sible for posing the questions to the
University's "thinkers," including
University professors and executive
officers.
* Still, the vice president plays an in-
tegral role in any re-evaluation of the
University's priorities. For example,
Frye decided to review the School of
Education in the face of declining
'enrollment and reports of low quality
in the school. After a review commit-
tee decided to make cuts in the school,
Frye shifted the money to other areas
such as faculty salary increases.
"THIS IS a dynamic university that
has to change. The vice president will
have to think about what things we
need to concentrate on for the
future," Shapiro said.
Duderstadt is mainly known for
redesigning the role of humanities
courses in the engineering college.

dation.
AT THE same time, however,
Josephson said Duderstadt is
"brilliant."
"Jim Duderstadt won't keep the
status quo. If he sees something
wrong he will got to the base of the
problem and tear away at it," he said.
Duderstadt was raised in a small
town in Missouri, and he earned a
bachelor's degree in engineering from
Yale University and a Master of
Science and a Ph.D. from the Califor-
nia Institute of Technology. He came
to the University of Michigan as an
assistant professor of nuclear
engineering in 1969 and has served as
dean since 1981.
DUDERSTADT'S primary goal as
dean has been to put the College of
Engineering back among the top half
dozen engineering schools in the coun-
try. He said recently that the college
is now ranked fifth or sixth in the
nation.
Associate engineering dean Charles
Vest said Duderstadt has built a
powerful and stable faculty in the
college.
"Although we will greatly miss his
personal leadership, our momentum
and commitment to excellence will
continue unimpeded," he said.
Since Duderstadt's appointment to
the office of Dean of the College of

WASHINGTON (UPI) - Manned
outposts on the moon by 2005 and
Mars a decade later and key objec-
tives of a civilian space plan to be
outlined to President Reagan by the
National Commission on Space, it was
reported yesterday.
The 200-page proposal scheduled to
go to the White House in mid-April
also will call for a new generation of
space transports to create a "highway
to space," according to the
authoritative aerospace magazine,
Aviation Week and Space Technology.
THE magazine, citing a final draft
of the commission's report, said the
panel envisions an evolution of
modular space bases beginning with
the currently planned space station in
1994 and progressing to an Earth or-
biting spaceport before the end of the
decade.
"Eventually there will be a network
of spaceports between Earth,
moon and Mars with permanent bases
on the moon and Mars," according to
the draft obtained by Aviation Week.
It said the report, dedicated to the
crew of the space shuttle Challenger
killed eight weeks ago, is titled:
"Pioneering the Space Frontier, Our
Next 50 Years in Space." The com-

mission was named last year by
Reagan to devise a long-term civilian
space agenda.
IN ANOTHER article, Aviation
Week quoted Roald Sagdeev, a key
leader of the Soviet civilian space
program, as saying an unmanned
flight to Mars to return soil samples to
Earth would be well suited for in-
ternational cooperation and could
lead the way to an international man-
ned flight to the planet.
The presidential commission's
report also recommended a new low-
cost cargo transport be put into 'ser-
vice by the year 2000 to greatly reduce
the cost of space travel.
For transporting people, Aviation
Week said the commission believes

the follow-on to the shuttle should be
an advanced reusable rocket ship of
an air-breathing aerospace plane. The
report called for a third ship to tran
sport people and supplies from Earth
orbit farther out in space.
SHORT OR LONG
Hairstyles for
Men and Women
DASCOLA STYLISTS
Liberty off State .. 668-9329
Maple Village .... 761 -2733

Duderstadt
.. . may replace Frye

Engineering, he has been responsible
for a vast number of changes to the
faculty, the students, and the
reputation of the college itself.
Faced with a shrinking budget and
an extraordinarly number of faculty
departures in 1981, Duderstadt has
rehired one-third of the entire faculty
- over 100 teachers - and installed a
competitive, merit-based salary
program to retain the staff currently
employed.
The average grade point of in-
coming freshmen entering the College
of Engineering has risen from 17 per-
cent of students in the ninety-ninth
percentile to 24 percent in 1985 and the
minority enrollment has increased 4
percent over the five-year period.

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