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March 24, 1986 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-24

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Page 2- - The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 24, 1986
Conference Day highlights Israeli society

By AMY GOLDSTEIN
Seventeen student, University, and
community organizations pooled
resources to present various dimen-
sions of Israeli society through the
Second Annual Israel Conference Day
in the Rackham building yesterday.
The day-long conference brought 23
scholars from Israel and the United
States to speak on topics including
religious pluralism, medical advan-
cements, Israeli industry, literature,
and the legal status of the Israeli oc-
cupied territories.
"THE IDEA here is predominantly to,
give a panoramic view of a
burgeoning society," said Joseph
Kohane, assistant director of the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, a co-
sponsor of the event.
The conference, which attractred
350 participants opened with a
keynote address by Prof. Ephriam
Yaar from Tel-Aviv University who is
a visiting professor at the University
of California.
Yaar classified Israeli society into
four conflict areas: ethic - between
European and Oriental Jews;
religious - between different levels of
religiosity; ethnic and religious
nationalism - between Israeli Jews
and Israeli Arabs; and political - the
Arab-Isreali conflict.
THESE conflict areas not only have
internal developments, Yaar said, but
also interact with each other.
The conference also included a
display of educational opportunities
for university students in Israel.
"There is no shortage of spaces" in
Israeli universities, said Dov Kerem
Ya'ar, the North American represen-
tative from the Committee for
University Studies in Israel. "The

idea is that students will come for one
year," he said.
Israeli universities are among the
most respected in the world, Ya'ar
said, and students need not worry
about their safety in the country.
OF THOSE students who attend a
year or semester program in Israel,
twenty-five percent eventually im-
migrate to Israel, according to Ya'ar.
"The youngsters are the potential
future of Israel," he said, touching
upon another theme which University
political scientist Zvi Gitelman ex-
panded.
Gitelman said that due to the high
birth rate among Arabs living in
Israel and the occupied territories
and the relatively low birth rate of
Israeli Jews, which is typical of a
modernized society, there will be an
equal number of Arabs and Jews in
Israel in the year 2015 if all factors
remain equal.
SUCH A balance would call the
Jewishness of the state into question,
he said. "If one wanted to maintain
the Jewish character, you need im-
migration."
Immigration of Jews also helps
maintain the state's security by en-
suring manpower for the military and
the dispersal of Jewish population
throughout the country.
Immigration also has benefits for
Israel's advancement, Gitelman ad-
ded, citing the contribution to the
Israeli economy by Soviet Jews who
immigrated. Forty percent of those
immigrants came with some degree
of higher education, he said.
But the absorption of immigrant
Ethiopian Jews, who now number
15,000, has not been as successful,
University education Prof. Tehame

Wagaw pointed out.
Wagaw told the story of one
Ethiopian Jew who maintained his
religious practices while in the
Ethiopian army and a Sudanese
prison where his execution sentence
was commuted. He immigrated to
Israel, only to find that the Chief Rab-
binate of Israel refused to recognize
Ethiopian Judaism and demanded
that he and other Ethiopian Jews con-
vert.
The Ethiopian said he would rather

face death than the humiliation of
conversion, according to Wagaw. The
professor used the story to exemplify
the feelings of Ethiopian Jews who
have recently immigrated to Israel.
The conference ended with a second
keynote speech by political science
Prof. Raymond Tanter, who called
the Middle East a "conflict garden,"
where fertile soil for successful peace.
measures has usually resulted from
circumstantial war.

Robinson urges economic
action against S. Africa

(Continued from Page 1)
policy-makers have been primarily
concerned with governments that op-
pose communism "no matter what
they do to their own people."
"If we can't have a policy that's
right, let's at least have a policy that's
smart," he said. "If we don't want the
Ayatollah, then we shouldn't have
supported the Shah. If we don't like
what comes out of Haiti, we shouldn't
have supported Duvalier. If we don't
like the ANC, we shouldn't have sup-
ported Botha."
U.S. foreign policy is flawed, he
said, by a lack of knowledge of dif-
ferent cultures and beliefs. "Karl
Marx, whether you agree with his
ideas or not, has probably been the
.most important figure in 20th century
politics. I can guarantee you that I
can go out and find someone who will
swear on the Bible that Karl Marx
was one of the Marx brothers."
About Africa, Robinson continued,
"I watched Happy Days in Zimbabwe.
I drank Donald Duck orange juice in
the Sahara. They know everything

about us, we know nothing about them
so our policy, by this very fact, is
flawed."
"Racism and arrogance cause us
not to see other people and cultures
around the world," he said.
"To fight racism abroad and at
home, we have to raise hell. We have
to make people comfortable with
racism uncomfortable," he said.
Robinson also urged blacks to con-
sider other blacks who have fought for.
civil rights.
Correction
University Associate Vice President
for Academic Affairs Niara
Sudarkasa expressed disappointment
last Thursday at the University's
current level of minority enrollment,
although she predicted that this level
would rise in the long-term. Her
comments in Friday's Daily were
incorrectly attributed to Virginia
Nordby, director of the University's
Office of Affirmative Action.

... ... ...................- - ----- - --- -
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CONTINUING
- A Series of Eyewitness Reports -
Tuesday, 12 Noon
March 25-"LAO AND CAMBODIAN REFUGEES IN THAILAND"
A SLIDE REPORT
Speaker: Winifred O'Dell Tan, Teacher of high school age Refugees for the
Save the Children Federation.
AT THE INTERNATIONAL CENTER-603 E. Madison St.
LUNCH AVAILABLE: Stuidents-$1 .00 Others-$1 .50
Co-sponsored by the Ecumenical Campus Center, the International Center.
Lunch prepared and served by Church Women United in Ann Arbor.
For additional information please call 662-5529

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THIS WEEK AT GUILD HOUSE
80 2 MO NROE
UA NN ARBOR, MI 48104
GUILD HOUSE
WRITERS SERIES
Monday, March 24 8:00 p.m.
KATHRYN GLASGOW and ANDREW TANG
READING FROM THEIR WORKS
*Cosponsored by the Michigan Student Assembly
FOR MORE INFO CALL 662-5189

mmmm-'s

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
Ortega warns U.S. advisors
MANAGUA, Nicaragua - President Daniel Ortega warned yesterday
that U.S. military advisers "are going to die" if they are sent to Central
America to train Contra rebels fighting to overthrow his leftist San-
dista government.
Ortega told a group of neighborhood defense committees that the
United States is conducting a military buildup in Central America to
prepare for an invasion of Nicaragua. U.S. troops holding joint military
maneuvers in Honduras and U.S. Navy warshps on exercises in the
Pacific threaten Nicaragua, he continued.
"We are living the war. Our enemy, the American government,
Reagan, is on top of us," Ortgega told the committee members on Saturday.
His comments were taped at the meeting and broadcast yesterday.
"They are there, looking for the least sign of weakness to enter ...
dividing the Nicaragua people to dominate them," he said.
Pakistanis protest Zia govt.
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan - People by the tens of thousands shouted
anti-government and anti-U.S. slogans yesterday and opposition leaders
said that President Mohammed Zia ul-Hag's pro-American government
was in its last days.
The Movement for the Restoration of Democracy, an alliance of 11 op-
position parties, held one of its biggest rallies since martial law was lifted
Dec. 30.
About 60,000 people marched through this city of about 1 million and
listened to anti-government speeches. The opposition staged dozens of
smaller demonstrations across the nation to commemorate Pakistan
Day, celebrated as independence day here.
"Did we create Pakistan so the army could rule? Did we create
Pakistan so the people could be whipped? Did we create Pakiston so the
people could be oppressed? one speaker asked the huge crowd that
waved the red, black and green opposition flags.
Speaker after speaker asserted that Zia's military government will fall
soon for lack of support, and said this entire nation of 88 million people
hungers for the return of democracy.
The United States was repeatedly criticized for supporting Zia, the ar-
my chief of staff who seized power in a bloodless coup in 1977.
Cancer Society calls for end
to tobacco advertising
DAYTONA BEACH, Fla - The American Cancer Society is calling for
elimination of all advertising of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, its
president said yesterday.
That includes an end to cigarette company sponsorship of events that
attract audiences of young people, Dr. Charles LeMaistre told the
society's seminar for science writers in Daytona Beach, Fla.
The proposal, similar to those endorsed by the American Medical
Association and American Lung Association, was approved recently by
the cancer society's board of directors, LeMaistre said.
"As a first step we have called for the elimination of all models and
scenery in this advertising, and asked that illustrations be limited to a
simple depiction of cigarette packages," LeMaistre said. "The society
does recommend that advertising copy should merely feature the tar and
nicotine content of the product, one of the four rotating warning messages
from the surgeon general, and the price of the product."
The board's resolution sets no timetable for the proposals, but notes the
society's commitment to a "smoke-free young America" by the year
2000.
Union Carbide agrees to pay
Bhopal leak damage claims
DANBURY, Conn. - Union Carbide Corp. said yesterday it has agreed
to pay $350 million in damage claims from a poison gas leak at its plant in
Bhopal, India, that killed more than 2,000 people and injured another
200,000 in the worst industrial disaster in history.
The tentative settlement was reached with lawyers for victims of the
disaster, which occurred when methyl isocyanate leaked from the com-
pany's pesticide plant in Bhopal Dec. 2-3, 1984, said Harvey Corbert, a
Union Carbide spokesman.
"The $350 million paid over time will produce a fund for the victims of
Bhopal of between $500 million and $600 million" because of accrued in-
terest, Corbert said.
The class action settlement covers everyone harmed by the disaster
whether or not they have filed suit against Union Carbide, headquartered
in Danbury.
OPEC fails to reach accord
GENEVA - OPEC oil ministers failed yesterday to reach an accord on
a way to fairly share a proposed production cutback designed to boost
slumping prices, but agreed to extend their marathon crisis talks for a
ninth day.
The 13-member Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries agreed

"in principle" Saturday to reduce combined output by about 14 percent,
from the current level of about 17 million barrels a day to roughly 14
million barrels.
The ministers said cutbacks are needed to bolster the price of oil, which
has plunged more than 50 percent in the face of production quota
violations and price discounting by OPEC members trying to compete
with non-OPEC producers.
But the ministers yesterday could not agree on national production quotas
needed to meet the cutbacks.
01 be Lxcbipan B nat
Vol. XCVI - No. 117
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term-$10 in
town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and subscribes
to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times
Syndicate, and College Press Service.

I
h
(,

March 28

Noon Forum

March 26

6-7 p.m.

JOHN VANDERMEER
"Following his return from
several months in Nicaragua
Mr. Vandermeer will give us
a current update."

RICE & BEANS NIGHT
$2 requested
Proceeds for material aid to
Central America.

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Editor in Chief............ERIC MATTSON
Managing Editor.........RACHEL GOTTLIEB
News Editor.............. JERRY MARKON
Features Editor...........CHRISTY RIEDEL
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Marc Carrel, Doy
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Nancy Driscoll, Rob Earle, Ellen Fiedelholtz, Amy
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Opinion Page Editor.........KAREN KLEIN
Associate Opinion Page Editor... HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Gayle Kirshenbaum,
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Arts Editor ............... NOELLE BROWER
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