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March 21, 1986 - Image 10

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-21

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Page 10 - The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 21, 1986
Contra aid bill defeat
upsets conservatives

4

Board

continues

(Continued from Page 1)+
he added, may still go on their own in
order to "show Pursell: By God,
there are some of your colleagues who.
have their heads screwed on right."
LASC member Mark Weisbrot, an
economics teaching assistant, said
that a few dozen people showed up
outside of Pursell's local office
yesterday to celebrate the bill's
defeat. Most of the people left by 7

in the office. Pursell voted in favor of
the package, as expected.
Campus conservatives had a dif-
fierent reaction to yesterday's vote.
"I think it's pretty sad that the House
couldn't see through the communist
propoganda," said Bill Tayler, a
college Republican who spoke in sup-
port of Pursell Tuesday on the Diag.
Tayler felt confident that Pursell
would vote in favor of future aid

work on code

'I think it's pretty sad that the House
couldn't see through the communist
propaganda.'
- Bill Tayler
College Republicans

p.m. and no arrests were made,
Weisbrot said.
The defeat of the aid package in the
House came after a week of protests
at Pursell's office that resulted in 118
arrests. The protesters had demon-
strated against Pursell's support of
the package and his failure to meeta
with their leaders or to hold a town
meeting on the issue.
A Washington spokesman for Pur-
sell said yesterday that the Ann Arbor
Republican was "disappointed, but he
looks forward to working on a com-
promise package." He said Pursell
still has no plans to meet with the
protesters, although LASC members
said they would seek such a meeting
before the House's April 15 vote on a
compromise package.
Pursell's local office has remained
closed all week, and yesterday an an-
swering machine was turned on which
had been off all week. It was not
known whether staff members were

packages because "Congressman
Pursell has seen through the rhetoric.
He knows the Sandinistas represent a
communist regime and a threat to
America."
Don Grimes, who is currently the
only Democrat running against Pur-
sell in the November election, said of
the House vote, "I was very pleased,
but I'm very disappointed in Carl
Pursell's vote." Grimes com-
missioned a poll in recent weeks that
showed, he said, that the Contra aid
package was unpopular in the Ann
Arbor area.
Grimes also criticized Pursell's
treatment of the protesters. "I think
it's disgusting that people have to get
arrested to get their representative's
attention," he said.
LASC plans to mount an
educational campaign on the issue of
Nicaragua before the House considers
a Contra co promise.

By KERY MURAKAMI
The University Council continued
fine-tuning its version of the code of
non-academic conduct yesterday,
but fell far short of finishing a draft
The council has been working for
over a year on an alternative code af-
ter students rejected the University
administration's code proposal in
1984. Students said such a code would
violate their civil rights.
Yesterday, councilmembers made
only a few semantic changes in their
procedures for how a student can
appeal an immediate sanction given
by a University administrator.
THE administrator can punish a
student, the council has previously
agreed, only if the accused poses a
physical threat to others at the
University. For example, if a student
attacks his professor, a "central
coordinator" could bar the student
from contact with the professor for up
to 14 days.
The University could then hold a
hearing on whether the punishment
should be continued for up to 14
weeks. Before the hearing, however,
the accused would be allowed to ap-
peal the administrator's initial
decision.
This appeal, the council agreed
yesterday, must be made within a
week after the accused is notified of

f
his punishment by the central coot;
dinator.
A SUBSET of the University councif
- made up of one student, one
faculty member, and one ad~
ministrator - would then hear the
appeal within 48 hours.
The review would not be a "full
blown" hearing, said law student
Suzanne Cohen, co-chair of the cou
cil. The council would not be respon-
sible for deciding if the facts used by
the administrator are true.4
Instead, council nembers said, the
board would decide whether the ad-
ministrator followed proper
procedures, if the sanctions are too
stringent or too ose, and if any new in-
formation should change the ad-
ministrator's decision.
If the coordinator decides not to take
any action, the victim could also ap-
peal the decision.
The council, concerned about their
slow progress, also yesterday decided
to begin meeting for 2 hours every
week, instead of 1% hours. Coun-
cilmembers had planned to finish
their "emergency procedures" by the
end of last month.
University President Shapiro
threatened last year to by-pass the
council, and to propose the admin-
stration's controversial code to the
regents if the council does not appear
to be making progress.

Associated Press
Chief Cherrick, who is one-fourth Cherokee, poses in traditional Indian
dress for one of his Indian Education classes. Cherrick is the director of
the Department of Indian Education in Oakland County.

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OPEC
fails to
reach

GENEVA (AP) - A fifth day of
OPEC talks ended yesterday with no
agreement on the key issue of cutting
the cartel's oil production, the OPEC
president said.
Arturo Hernandez Grisanti, who
also is the oil minister of Venezuela,
said the 13 member nations would
meet with officials from five non-
OPEC nations today to discuss the
specifics of cutting production.
Grisanti said OPEC had come to
agreement on what it would request

He refused to disclose any details.
"We will make a specific proposal
to the non-OPEC," he told reporters.
"That proposal I cannot reveal."
Gholamreza Aghazaden, the oil
minister of Iran, confirmed as he left
the meeting that it included specific
cuts in the non-OPEC nations' oil out-
put.
"We have two points to raise with
non-OPEC," he said through an
Iranian interpreter. "One is to defend
the official prices. The second is that

were in the proposal.
Representatives of the five in-
dependent producers held a series of
bilateral and group meetings with the
OPEC officials earlier this week but
gave no firm assurances they would
cut their output.
Grisanti gave no indication that the
cartel ministers were any nearer to
agreement on the more important
question of cutting their own produc-
tion.
"This conference is a very difficult

we can reach decisions," he said after
six hours of deliberations.
Conference sources, speaking on.
condition of anonymity, said as
yesterday's talks ground to a halt that
chances seemed to be fading that
OPEC could agree on production cuts
aimed at reversing the oil-price
collapse.
Without major cuts in the output of
the Organization of Petroleum Expor-
ting Countries, world oil prices would
be expected to remain at current

Prices have crashed by about half,
to $13-15 a barrel, since 'OPEC
declared last December that it would
not restrain its production unless
Britain and other non-OPEC countries
did the same.
On the New York Mercantile Ex-
change yesterday, contracts for April
delivery of West Texas Intermediate,
the benchmark U.S. crude, declined to
$12.78 a 42-gallon barrel from Wed-
nesday's close.

I

1e)1 1.1 from non-members Mexico, they must cut their production." He one, but we are willing to continue to levels, or even fall further, analysts Contracts for April delivery of
Malaysia, Egypt, Oman and Angola. did not say what official" prices discuss these problems facing us until have said. refined products also slumped.

Protesters rally against apartheid on Diag.
(Continued from Page 2)

Dartmouth Review, a conservative
campus newspaper, used a bulldozer
to tear down several shanties built to
protest Dartmouth's involvement in
South Africa. The Dartmouth students
were subsequently arrested for the
shanty attack.
Ransby said people will be staying
in the shanty round-the-clock for the
entire two-week rally. She said this
was partly to prevent a similar at-
tack, but was specifically aimed at
maintaining a constant vigil
protesting apartheid.
SETH KLUKOFF, editor of the
Michigan Review, said the Review's

editorial board was "unanimously
opposed to the Dartmouth Review's
action." He said the editors of the
Dartmouth Review showed "poor
leadership" by destroying the shanty.
Doris Wilson, a member of FSACC,
said that besides protesting apar-
theid, the group wants to bring more
attention to racism in the United
States and at the University. She said,
"There has been an increase in racist
graffiti on campus in the past several
months." University maintenance
crews have confirmed this rise.
FSACCs activities for the next two

weeks, however, will focus mostly on
apartheid. The group will sponsor a
series of speakers and films and will
sponsor a forum with representatives
of the African National Congress and
the South West Africa People's
Organization. The protests will
culminate April 4 with a freedom
march where FSACC members will
be joined by representatives of the
ANC, SWAPO, and the Rev. Charles
Adams of the Detroit NAACP.
"We can make a difference,"
Wilson said about the anti-apartheid
activities. She said they have received
support from the National Lawyer's
Guild, the Law School Student Senate,

of which Wilson is a representative,
the Latin American Solidarity Com-
mittee, and other groups on campus.
1) D
Support the
March of Dimes
BIRTH DEFECTS FOUNDATION

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Rev. discusses motives of
pe ople wo joinep cults
(Continued from Page 1)
elt his life was empty. He was distur- Baghwanism stresses meditation as
ed by social injustice, and turned to a way to become more aware o'f
he church because he thought it could nature and oneself. "It's a very un-
reate a better world, structured religion," Nagda said.
Nagda became interested in the
According to Williams, the Bahgwan movement after recieving a
[nification church attempts to unite response to a letter he wrote to
eople form different races and social Bahgwan, the leader of the
roups. The church encourages in- movement. Bahgwan encouraged
erracial marriages "as a challenge Nagda to meditate for a month before
o the heart to become a more loving becoming a "senysian", or disciple of
erson," Williams said. the movement.
Ratnesh Nagda, a representative of "That was the most beautiful time
he Baghwans, said he belongs to a"a of my life. That's when I decided this
piritual, not a religious is for me," Nagda said.
rganization." The Baghwan When he finallly met Bahgwan,
novement, which orginated in India Nagda found that he was "just an or-
nd has a commune in Oregon, en- dinary guy."
ourages its members "to live, love At that time, however, Bahgwan
nd laugh," he said. owned 93 Rolls Royces.

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