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March 19, 1986 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-19

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E

State High School
Basketball Championships
Fri. and Sat., March 21 and 22
Crisler Arena

SPORTS

Baseball
vs. Grand Valley
March 24, 1 p.m.
Ray Fisher Stadium

The Michigan Daily

Wednesday, March 19, 1986

Page 8

SPRING FOOTBALL PRACTICE BEGINS

Bo looks to fill vacancies

By PHIL NUSSEL
The season opener at Notre Dame is six months
away, but preparations for the 1986 football season
began yesterday as Michigan started its spring
practice season.
Even after finishing the 1985 season ranked
second in the country with a 10-1-1 record, head coach
Bo Schembechler did not fear complacency in his
ranks.
"IF WE HAI) a soft coaching staff, then I would
worry about (complacency)," Schembechler said.
"But I don't think that's going to be a problem
because we didn't win a conference championship
and we didn't win the Rose Bowl. Other than
finishing second nationally, we really didn't accom-
plish any of our goals.
"We have a lot of things we want to do, so I don't
fear any complacency. If we see (complacency),
then we'll attack it and I hope we don't see it.
The Wolverines return 27 lettermen on an offense
that averaged 28 points a game. Three starting
spots are open. The key loss was at tight end with
the departure of All-American Eric Kattus who
caught 38 passes for 586 yards and 8 touchdowns.
Sophomore Jeff Brown is next in line for Kattus'
spot after seeing action in short-yardage situations
last year.
THE OTHER two open spots on offense are center
and quick tackle. Andy Borowski and Jerry Quaer-
na could take those spots.
Mark Hammerstein, a starter at guard for the fir-
st three games last season, will miss spring drills

while recovering from the knee surgery that put him
out of action. He is out of the cast, but Schembechler
would not risk re-injuring the star lineman.
Eighteen lettermen are back on defense, but they
will be pressed to repeat the performance of the '85
defense, which allowed just five touchdowns in the
first 11 games.
SCHEMBECHLER'S main concern was filling
the voids left by defensive tackle Mike Hammer-
stein, cornerback Brad Cochran and linebacker
Mike Mallory.
"(The loss of) Cochran at corner, that's impor-
tant," said Schembechler. "We hope to move in the
freshman Dave Arnold in that position, but it's
tough to play."
Dave Folkertsma is set to grab the tackle spot
while Andree McIntyre and Todd Schulte vie for
Mallory's position. Both outside linebacker spots
are open and Steve Thibert, Dieter Heren, Carl
Bostic and Tim Schulte will compete for the starting
job.
LIKE LAST season, the place-kicking game will
feature a battle between Rick Sutkiewicz, Mike
Gillette and Pat Moons. Monte Robbins is expected
to punt once again.
Gillette, who kicked field goals and extra points
last season until a suspension before the Ohio State
game, is catching for the baseball squad, but shows
up for football practice first. "Once the specialty

practice is over, he can go play baseball," Schem-
bechler said. "So he won't miss the opportunity to
compete. But as you know, our kicking game is up
for grabs and we'll see who comes out of spring
drills."
The team is scheduled to practice four times a
week until the annual spring game at Michigan
Stadium April 19. Schembechler plans to start full-
contact scrimmaging Saturday. "They could start
hitting today," he said. "They're in great shape
right now."
IN OTHER spring practice news:
" Schembechler is high on his second-string
tailback Thomas Wilcher, who won an NCAA indoor
hurtling title last weekend in Oklahoma City, Okla.
"I told him I didn't mind him running track, but
when he said that because of football, his ac-
celeration improved for track, I said, 'He knows
what to say, he knows I'm looking at that TV.' "
" A host of outgoing players showed up for prac-
tice including Cochran, Hammerstein, Mallory, Bob
Tabachino and Jim Scarcelli. But as soon as the
laps began, Cochran was heard to say, "That's the
part I don't miss."
" Defensive tackle Mark Messner, who led the
Wolverines with 14 quarterback sacks, weights 257
pounds now. Last fall he carried 235 pounds.
* Schem bechler said he is in the middle of the pack
in the football staff's NCAA basketball pool - he
picked Michigan and Louisville in the final.

E

Daily Photo by MATT PETRIE
Dave Folkerstma receives a little advice from graduating All-American
Mike Hammerstein. Folkertsma is expected to replace Hammerstein at
defensive tackle.

Hearns ranks with best
By CHRISTIAN M. MARTIN

W ITH HIS impressive first round
knockout of James "Blackgold"
Shuler last week for the NABF mid-
dleweight title, Thomas Hearns
should have proven to everyone he is a
great figter.
Packed into his perfect boxing body
the "Hit Man" has been a force to
reckon with his entire career. With
broad shoulders and long arms to block
his opponents punches, and lightning
quick hands capable of knocking an
opponent out with one punch, Thomas
Hearns has terrorized the boxing
world for all of his 44 fights.
Hearn's trainer and manager
Emanuel Steward is one of the most
respected, knowledgeable men in the
entire boxing business. Steward has
brought Hearns up slowly so that his
great natural talents weren't hurried
and subsequently destroyed. Steward
has always had his fighter mentally and
physically prepared for every match.
This is one of the reasons Thomas

Hit man' lacks credit

Associated Press
With his 73 second knockout of James Shuler (foreground) last Monday night, Thomas "Hit Man" Hearns ear-
ned the right to a rematch with undisputed middleweight champion Marvelous Marvin Hagler. Despite the
overwhelming punching power Hearns displayed against Shuler, he'll need more than a right hand to unseat
the champion.

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SPOR TS OF THE DAILY:
Texas sweeps up netters, 8-1

Hearns has compiled his impressive
record of 41-2. In those 43 fights the
Hit Man has knocked out 35 opponents
- an 81 percent knockout rate.
Hearns record is even more im-
pressive given the quality of fighters
he has faced. Looking for challenges
and ducking no one, Hearns has faced
and beaten Roberto Duran, Pipino
Cuevas and Wilfred Benitez. Victories
over such highly respected cham-
pions and winning belts in three dif-
ferent weight categories - welter-
weight, junior middleweight, and
middleweight - would usually
automatically enshrine someone in
the anals of boxing history as an all-
time great.
Unfortunately for Hearns, such
respect has been hard to find.
Instead, he is perceived in the
public eye as the second toughest guy
on the block. This is because his
illustrious career happened to occur
in the same time span and involve
weight classes that included Sugar
Ray Leonard and Marvelous Marvin
Hagler. These two men are perhaps
two of the greatest boxers the sport
has ever known.
Thomas Hearns fought both of
them. Although neither fight went the
distance, Hearns pushed both men to
their absolute limits before they came
back and beat him. Both fights are

SPORTING
VIEWS

looking at the wrong side of a ten
count.
This apparently cruel twist of fate,
an almost evenly matched Hearns in
the same era as Hagler and Leonard,
has robbed him of the respect he
deserves from today's sporting worl
and tomorrow's boxing history. In-
stead of being recognized as one of the
truly great fighters of all-time, an
honor his accomplishments should
have already secured for him, he will
be remembered as simply one of the
many good welterweights or mid-
dleweight champions who at some
point won the title.
The "Great" Thomas Hearns has
yet to receive the status he deserves.

PM

regarded as all-time great battles
where in both cases either fighter coul
have gone down for a ten count at any
time near the end. But, both times
Hearns was the one who ended up

From staff reports
Special to the Daily
AUSTIN, Tx - Texas put it to the
men's tennis team on Monday,
defeating the Wolverines, 8-1.
The Longhorns swept Michigan in
singles action. Royce Deppe defeated
Dan Goldberg, 7-6, 6-2, Paul
Koscielski won over Jim Sharton, 6-3,
6-3, and Charles Beckman beat Ed
Filer, 6-3, 6-0. Other losers for the
Wolverines included John Royer, Jon
Morris, and Chip McCole.
Royer and McCole were the only
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Wolverines to win a set in losing effor-
ts to John Boytim (2-6, 6-0, 6-2) and
Chip Lieghton (6-3, 2-6, 6-4), respec-
tively.
It was more of the same story in
doubles action, where Texas took two
of three matches. Number three
doubles team Brad Koontz and Mc-
Cole defeated Robert Rutledge and
Tom Bartzen, 6-2, 6-0, for Michigan's
lone victory.
The loss dropped the Wolverines to 3-3
on the season. Michigan plays Rice
University today in Houston, Texas.
NFL players offer
new drug testing plan
WASHINGTON (AP) - A new anti-
drug plan drafted by the National
Football League Players Association
will propose more extensive testing
during the season, a union leader said
yesterday.
Mark Murphy, executive vice
president of the NFLPA, said the
"comprehensive proposal" was for-
mulated by union members Saturday
and will be unveiled at a news con-
ference this morning.
MURPHY refused to reveal par-
ticulars of the plan, except to say the
testing provisions would go further
than what is called for in the current
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collective bargaining agreement.
The contract allows drug testing at
the opening of the training camp and
for "reasonable cause" during the
season.
Reportedly, the union's plan will
acknowledge the need for testing
during the season of first offenders,
but it is unclear how that would differ
from the current plan, which allows
testing of a player who has a positive
pre-season test.
NFL Commissioner Pete Rozelle
said last week that he will impose a
plan of his own if the union and the
owners' bargaining unit cannot
agree on a stronger program through
collective bargaining. There was
some disagreement whether Rozelle
had the power to do that since drug
testing was part of the collective
bargaining agreement.
Rozelle has said he could act for the
good of the league, declaring that sin-
ce drugs are eroding the financial
health of the NFL as well as the
physical health of its affected players.
"It can affect the money that comes
into the NFL, so it's a pure economic
problem," Rozelle said. "We'll lose
ratings, we'll lose television adver-
tising, it will have a long-term effect."
Murphy agreed that drugs have had
an adverse impact on the game.
"There's no doubt that drug use in the
league is a problem," Murphy said.
"It's a disease that's got to be stop-
ped."

-0

Anderson, Whalers

at
DETROIT (UPI) - John Anderson
scored three goals and teammate Stewart
Gavin added two last night to lead the
Hartford Whalers to a 6-4 victory over
the Detroit Red Wings.
The triumph moved the Whalers
within two points of the Buffalo
Sabres in the battle for the fourth and
final playoff berth in the Adams
Division of the National Hockey
League.
DETROIT jumped out to a 2-0 lead
on first-period goals by John Ogrod-
nick and Petr Klima. Ogrodnick took
a drop pass from Mike O'Connell and
beat goalie Mike Liut with a 40-
foot slapshot at 6:13. Klima scored his
eighth goal in nine games on a wrist
shot from 20 feet at 9:08.
Hartford's John Anderson cut the

Fin gs, 6-4
lead to 2-1 with 1:59 left in the first
period when he fired from the slot af-
ter taking a pass from Ray Ferraro.
Gavin tied the game at 11:47 of tiq
second period when he converted a
pass from Sylvain Turgeon and he put
the Whalers ahead 3-2 1:16 later,
knocking Dean Evason's rebound into
an open net.
Evason's deflection of Dave
Babych's pass during a power play at
17:01 of the second period increased
Hartford's lead to 4-2.
Anderson scored his second goal of
the game on a 2-on-1 break at 4:10 0
the third period. It was is fifth in fiva
games since joining Hartford in a
trade with the Quebec Nordiques.
Detroit's Gerard Gallant added a
power-play goal at 7:10 and Anderson
completed his hat trick into an empty
net with 1:04 remaining. Klima scored
his second of the game and 27th of the
season at 19:11.
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