100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 17, 1986 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

... . . . _ _ . . . .

The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 17, 1986 - Page 9

IsU
(Continued from Page

eliminates 'M'
9

1)

wosome--ball handling and outside
shooting-let Iowa State get ahead for
good. A 19-18 lead with 9:07 remaining
would be Michigan's last of the
season.
Two and a half minutes later a
Robert Henderson rebound bucket

tied the game at 21, but Iowa State
went on a 9-2 run over the following
two and a half minutes.
The Cyclones eventually turned
Michigan's mistakes into a nine-point
lead, which is where the 40-31 halftime
margin remained.

Orrible!

IOWA STATE
MinFG/A FT/A
HIH .............F26 3/6 5/
Tompkins ...... 29 4/5 0/0
Grayer .......... 37 5/12 6/7
Virgil ........... 34 7/8 0/0
Moss ............ 15 2/2 2/2
Hornacek ....... 35 3/6 1/2
Schafer ......... 9 0/1 1/2
Robinson ........ 15 2/3 5/7
Team Rebounds .

R
4
0
6
3
0
2
1
2
4

A
9
3
0
4
0
6
0
0

PF
4
3
0
2
3
4
1
2

TP
8
16
14
6
7
1
9
72

MICHIGAN
MinFG/A FT/A R A PF TP

Grant.........
Joubert.......
Tarpley .........
Reliford .........
Wade............
Henderson ......
Rice.............
Thompson .......
Team Rebounds.

36
31
38
30
18
26
7
14

1/9
5/8
9/18
5/8
2/3
3/4
1/3
0/4

2/3
1/2
7/
3/4
0/®
2/3
0/0
2/2

2
1
14
4
1
5
4
2
4

5
1
1
0
0
0
0
1

5
5
5
2
4
2
3
0

4
11
25
13
4
8
2
2

"(IT WAS) just few silly passes and
and mental breakdowns," Henderson
said. "We throw three or four passes
away; they score six to eight points.
You take away the six or so points we
would have scored and it's about a 12-
point swing."
Tarpley took over the game again
for the middle seven minutes of the
second half, scoring nine points in
helping Michigan cut an 11-point Iowa
State lead to three, 56-53 on a free
throw with 8:36 left in the game.
The second team All-America cen-
ter then blocked a shot as Richard
Rellford took charge. Rellford hit two
free throws to trim Iowa State's lead
to one, and the two teams traded
baskets three times. Tarpley's spin-
ning pull-up jumper in the lane closed
that series.
BUT WHEN Tarpley picked up his
fourth foul on a charge at 5:54, the
magic was wearing off. Iowa State
pulled ahead by six and fought off
'Michigan's last blast with the Robin-
son inbounds.
"We played a good second half,"
said Freider, "but we just couldn't get
it over the hymp."
Said Tarpley: "When it got down to
the wire, we couldn't make the big
plays."

TOTALS ...... 200 26/43 26/28 21 14 19

TOTALS.........200 26/57 17/23 37 8 26 69

aI time Score: ISU 40, Michigan 31
JF4tteadnace: 25,543
By Adam Martin
NCAA tournament . .
survival is the key
MINNEAPOLIS
Jim Valvano, North Carolina State's vocal and eccentric head coach, tur-
ned prophet yesterday after the Wolfpack downed upstarted Arkansas-
Little Rock.
"This tournament," Valvano said, "is about survival. You hope you can
survive and then advance to the next round."
Valvano spoke from experience. A few years back (remember?) the
Wolfpack survived a four-game streak before heroically upending Phi
Slamma Jamma and the Houston Cougars in the final minute of the National
Championship.
Yesterday, when Valvano's club escaped the Metrodome after two over-
times and advanced to Kansas City for one of the Midwest region's semi-
final games, he spoke for all of college basketball when he talked survival.
The Wolfpack survived. The Wolverines didn't. This of course was the.
message last year when Michigan failed to overcome the never-say-die
Villinova Wildcats, the 1985 National Champions. To everyone's surprise,
history repeated itself, even after the players and Coach Bill Frieder said it
wouldn't happen.
The message today stems not from Michigan's inability to win, but from
the NCAA tournament itself.
Undoubtedly, many people's tourney picks and pools are in shambles
because of the wave of upsets in 1986's tournament. If you're surprised by
the upsets, rethink those pre-tourney assumptions.
Needless to say (but a good reminder), the NCAA postseason champion-
ship is a sudden death tournament. Pro wrestling has its "battles to the
death," but the fights are phony. In the NCAA's , the battles are real.
Teams simply refuse to yield. When ESPN's always blunt and often ob-
noxious commentator Dick Vitale and the rest of the sports-media complex
write off the lesser-knowns, the lesser-knowns appear on the next round's
card.
So it goes with Michigan's final game of the '85 season. The Wolverines
were expected to win almost every game they play this season. Against
Georgia-Tech- probably the only club on Michigan's schedule to top the
Wolverines in the expectation department- Michigan survived.
That was the beginning. Twenty-eight wins and five losses later, Michigan
could not survive- the underdog Iowa State Cyclones.
For the Wolverines, the end looked frighteningly similar to their other low
points of the season. Twice they faultered against Michigan State, and
moreh than anything else the Spartan's quickness was responsible.
Quickness (and several mistakes) killed the Wolverines against Iowa
State. It was a tale Bill Frieder had told before.
"So many teams today are surviving that don't have exceptional size
because of their quick hands and quick jumpers," Frieder said. "What they
lose inside on muscle, they make up with the transition game and steals."
Michigan, however, was never able to make up enough ground yesterday
to score the one or two point victory so characterisitic of the NCAA tour-
nament.
"In high school tournaments," Frieder reflected, "You always have the
one or two point victory along the way that you could have lost, and it's a
-thesameat (the college) level.
"A lot of things have got to go right and you've got to have some luck. And
you certainly have to play well for forty minutes to get there."
The message is opaque but clear all the same. Teams that advance osten-
sibly win the early round battles, but they literally survive. When it takes
two overtimes for N.C. State to eliminate Arkansas-Little Rock and a large
dose of speed and poise for Iowa State to withstand the pressure of the
Wolverine comeback, the result is a victory, but more aptly labeled a suc-
cessful outward-bound adventure.
Winning the National Championship then is more a zero-sum game than
anything else. No team lives without another daying. And rarely do teams die
easily.
Jim Valvano learned this lesson a few years back, and lived to tell-and
smile- about it. He is now a college backetball prophet.
When Bill Frieder watches the survivors tiptoe through the remainder of
the tournament, he'll be listening to Valvano and the rest of those who
escape.

The Iowa State bench erupts in jubilation after their 72-69 win over Michigan. The loss marks the second year
the Wolverines have collapsed in the second round.

Wolfpack
By BARB McQUADE
Special to the Daily
MINNEAPOLIS- Arkansas-Little Rock had no
intention of serving as anyone's stepping stone in
the Midwest Region, taking North Carolina State to
two overtimes yesterday before rolling over, 80-66,1
in second round NCAA tournament action.
N.C. State's Bennie Bolton led all scorers with 241
points. Sophomore Chris Washburn chipped in 221
and Charles Shackleford nabbed 11 rebounds to
send the Wolfpack to the final 16 in Kansas City next'
weekend.
THE OUTSIZED UALR team stayed with the
Wolfpack with a full court press, but eventually ran
out of steam.
"We finally got to a point where size was the dif-

shakes pesky Trojans

i

ference," said Trojan head coach Mike Newell.
"When you're playing six big guys against players'
who are 6-10 or 6-11, you finally wear down,
especially when you have to keep pressing."
N.C. State's twin towers, Shackleford and Wash-
burn, kept the paint clear, forcing the Trojans to
shoot outside. UALR's guard Myron Jackson tore
the Wolfpack's zone apart in the first half by can-
ning 8 of 13 from the floor and racking up 16 points.
THE SECOND HALF was another story, though.
The 6-3 senior was held scoreless as the Wolfpack
adjusted its zone.
"They were pushing him out farther than he's
used to shooting the basketball," Newell said.
Jackson regained his shooting touch in the first
overtime, scoring 6 of the Trojans' 8 points. He tied

the game, 64-64. But even the sharp-shooting
playmaker couldn't stick it to N.C. State another
time.
Still standing strong for the Wolfpack, Bolton kept
the ball inside and let the smaller UALR defenders
slap at his elbows in the second overtime. N.C. State
outscored the Trojans 16-2 in the five minute period.
"Bolton carried us in the overtime," said N.C.
State's head coach Jim Valvano. "Before we lacked
someone who would say, "Give me the rock,' when
the game is on the line. Now maybe we've got him."
The jubilated Valvano did more than break a
sweat during the contest. "I split my pants in the
first game, I lost my jacket n the second, I should
be naked by the time I'm done."

Blue squeaks by Zips,

By TOM KEANEY
Special to the Daily
MINNEAPOLIS - First round
games in the NCAA tournament are
intended to be little more than a war-
mup for top-ranked teams against
unknown teams from unknown con-
ferences.
Notre Dame found out differently
from Arkansas-Little Rock, and
Michigan barely escaped falling vic-
tim to little-known Akron in Friday's
first round game at the Metrodome in
Minneapolis.
THE STORY OF the game was on
the boards. Michigan, which had a
huge advantage over Akron in height,
was outrebounded by the Ohio Valley
Conference Champs, 34-28.
The Wolverines had to be thinking
at least a little about last year's first
round battle against Fairleigh
Dickinson as they fought the Zips
tooth and nail in the first half.

Michigan, in fact, went to the inter-
mission trailing Akron 32-30.
Though the Zips did not shoot
especially well (45 percent), their
second and third chances on offensive
possessions created enough oppor-
tunities to not only outshoot the
Wolverines, but also control the tem-
po of the game.
"(AT THE HALF) we knew we had
to come back out and do the right
things," said Gary Grant. "We knew
what we had to do."
"Most disturbing to me was the
rebounding," said Michigan head
coach Bill Frieder. "But with our big
lineup, sometimes the quickness of
other teams can beat us on the boar-
ds."
"It was obvious to us we weren't
using our height advantage," said
forward Robert Henderson. "They
took advantage of our -inconsisten-
cies.

FOR THE MOST part,
however, the Wolverines did
what they wanted in the second half.
Hot-shooting Zip forward Marcel
Boyce picked up his fourth foul with
12:12 remaining and had to sit out
most the half.
With Boyce out of the lineup,
Michigan was more able to control the
tempo and get its front line into the
game.
Moreover, when the Wolverines got
the rebound, they were unstoppable.
They had an array of baskets on the
transition opportunities, taking ad-
vantage of a Zip defense which was of-
ten sluggish in setting up.
FRESHMAN GLEN Rice, playing in
his first tournament game, was
especially impressive in reponding to
the pressure. He went 6-9 from the
floor in only twenty minutes played.
"I didn't even expect to play this
much," said Rice, "but the more con-

fidence I get, the better my shots are
going to be."
Henderson gained his first start of
the season as regular starting center
Roy Tarpley was benched for the first
5:45 for disciplinary reasons.
Frieder declined discussion on any
specifics of the infraction, stating, "It
was a very very minor problem
period, you can compare it to not
paying attention at the team meeting
or showing up late."

oyrvce

524
LSA Building
764-9216

EAST REGIONAL:
Navy sinks Syracuse, 9-7=85

SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP)-David
Robinson scored 26 of his 35 points in
the second half yesterday as 17th-
ranked Navy embarrassed No. 9
Syracuse 97-85 on its home court and
advanced to the NCAA East Regional
semifinals.
Navy's opponent next Friday at
East Rutherford, N.J. will be
Cleveland State. The other East
Regional semifinal pairing will be
Saturday's survivors, No. 1 Duke and
DePaul.
THE STUNNED Carrier Dome
crowd saw the Middies register their
15th straight victory and make it 22
wins in 23 games.
Robinson, a 6-11 junior and a poor 61
percent free-throw shooter entering
the game, made 21 of 27 free

throws-16-of 19 in the second half- as
Syrcase's 6-10 Rony Seikaly and his
backup, Rodney Walker, fouled out.
Navy, which led 32-31 at halftime,
snapped a 39-39 tie and broke the
game open with an 18-7 run with 10:21
to go. Robinson scored 14 points
during the spree as Seikaly picked up
his third and fourth personal fouls.
NAVY, champions of the Colonial
Athletic Association, kept pouring it
on and Seikaly fouled out with 7:11
left.
Navy's Vernon Butler, who finished
with 23 points, converted a three-point
play to put the Middies up 70-53 with
6:25 remaining.
Navy made only 28 field goals, but
converted 41 of 52 from the free-throw
line.

Cleveland St. 75,
St. Joseph's 69
SYRACUSE, N.Y. (AP)-Guard
Ken "Mouse" McFadden scored 23
points and had a 70-foot assist late in
the game Sunday to help upstart
Cleveland State to a 75-69 victory over
St. Joseph's in the second round of the
NCAA East Regional basketball tour-
nament.

INSTANT:
Passport - Visa-
1pp ticaes Photos
while U wait
Hrs. 1:00 - 4:30
Mon.- Fri.
10% STUDENT DISCOUNT

Unzipped

AKRON
MinFG/A FT/A

MICHIGAN
MImFG/AFT/A

R A PF Pts

Relltord .........
ade............
Henderson ......
Joubert .........
Grant ...........
Tarpley .........
Rice.............
Thwmpsou.......
Team Rebounds

25
26
19
33
31
29
2
15

2/3
2/4
2/4
5/12
3/5
4/11
6/9
3/3

3/4
8/3
2/3
2/2
®/s
5/5
2/2
2/2

R
3
3
4
2
1
9
2
4

A
1
0
0
1
7
1
1
0

PF Pts
4 7
3 4
0 6
0 12
2 6
3 13
2 14
0 8

Holmes..........
Roberts .........
Boyce ...........
Dowdel .......
Loyer.........
Schutz...........
Taylor ..........
McLaughUn .....
McLendon.......
Team Rebounds

27
23
31
30
25
26
6
30
2

1/8
1/6
8/16
4/8
2/2
2/6
0/0
8/12
1/2

2/2
0/0
1/3
3/4
1/2
2/2
1/2
0/0
0/0

6
3
8
2
3
4
0
0
0
8

1
0
2
0
I
0
0
6

4
2
4
2
1
1
2
2
1

2
2
17
11
5
6
1
16
2

A

what's
Happening

THE SEVENTH ANNUAL CONFERENCE
ON THE HOLOCAUST
"FAITH IN GOD, FAITH IN EACH OTHER"
(All of the programs scheduled are free and open to the public)
Monday, March 17
"ETHICAL CHOICES WITHIN THE DEATH CAMPS:
TESTIMONIES OF HOLOCAUST SURVIVIORS"
7:00 p.m., Pendleton Room in the Michigan Union
Professor Lawrence Langer, Simmons College
Thesday, March 18
"'THE COURAGE TO CARE':

TOTALS ........ 200 27/51 16/21 28 11 14 70

TOTALS.........200 27/6010/15 34 6 19 64

Recreational Sports

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan