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March 17, 1986 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-17

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Page 2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 17, 1986
Fair promotes alternative jobs

By KURT SERBUS
"Finding a career is not easy for
everyone. Those who want to work
with a socially responsible attitude
towards peace, justice, and
equality for all can get especially
frustrated. "
So read the brochure for the 7th an-
nual Alternative Career Fair, which
took place Friday and Saturday at
East Quad. The fair was organized to
help socially aware students find jobs
where they would not have to co-
mpromise their morals, according to
organizer Ann Fitzpatrick, an LSA
senior.
THE FAIR, which consisted mainly
of a series of workshops, concentrated
on letting students know that they can
go into any field and tailor their

careers to meet their moral standar-
ds.
Speakers included independent
filmmakers who use the media to
educate people, educators, and scien-
tists who discussed alternatives in
science and technology, lawyers who
stressed public service law, artists,
community organizers, health
professionals, business people and
environmentalists.
"I myself have a need for this type
of information, and so do a lot of
others. They need to know how people
can pursue their goals and make a
living at the same time," Fitzpatrick
said.
FAIR participants shared their ex-
periences and provided valuable tips
and contacts for those interested in
careers which involve social change.
"It's about role models, net-

working, letting people know there
are other things out there," said Fit-
zpatrick.! Things like this are really
valued by a certain amount of studen-
ts."
Most of the speakers emphasized
that financial sacrifices, although a
factor to consider when choosing a
career involving social change, is
outweighed by the satisfaction and
responsibility inherent in such
careers.
"You don't really pick (a career in
social change), it picks you," said
Sarah Schulman, a playwright and
journalist involved in feminist and
lesbian issues. "And once you get
beyond the money thing, you realize
there are so many things people have
that they just don't need. You have to
listen close to what people are telling
you you need."

Emily Hall, an expert in housing
law, said "I've always felt that if
money was all I wanted, I could get it
easy. If you do something that makes
people's lives a little better, you feel
like you've accomplished
something."
The speakers also stressed that the
current political climate is one of the
biggest barriers for those who are in-
terested in instituting social change.
"I'm very happy I'm not a college
student now," said Schulman. "This
is a very hard decade to do what you
want to do."
George Corsetti, a film networker
and free-lance writer, echoed
Schulman, saying "You don't get a lot
of emotional support from the society
that surrounds you because you're not
into the same things and you don't get
the same rewards."

Police arr
(Continued from Page 1)
Reagan's proposal for $70 million in
military aid and $30 million in
humanitarian aid to the Contras, will
be voted on Wednesday by the full
House of Representatives.
LASC has called for a protest in
front of Pursell's office every day
before the vote to protest Contra aid,
which it says supports terrorism and
destruction. Pursell's support "can
only be seen as a gesture of utmost
disrespect for his constituents," said
Thea Lee, vice president of Rackham
Student Government.,
THREE to five people were at Pur-
sell's office throughout the entire day,
but in the late afternoon numbers
swelled as more than 50 protesters oc-
cupied the lobby of the building.
The building had been opened for
business at the request of a weight
loss center located inside, although no

est 39 at protest
members of Pursell's staff were in his Law student Dmit
office. On Thursday, demonstrators that since 8:15 a.m.
had been barred entrance. all seen the graveyar
At 6:30 p.m. protesters worried that good that peoplle kn
they again would not be arrested, Protesters did not
because the police were not showing business at the weigh
concern about the protest. Officers said, although police
did not monitor the demonstration ex-
cept for a brief visit at 8:30 a.m. Il
BUT AT 7 p.m. the landlord finally
called the police, in order to close the
building for the weekend.
"We are very committed to makingu ne
a point," said LSA junior Si iStniar,
explaining why protesters were
arrested. "We feel very strongly weyou pain r iConued f e
need to make an impression. He yi opine reaing.ve
co-his voice breaking.
(Pursell) is not representing his con- MANY marchers
stituents." their jobs or school
"Spirits have been pretty high all what was envisioned
day," said LSA freshman David strators striding to W
Stoesz. "Just the presence here is a A PRO-Peace spi
vigil. It's symbolic in itself," he said. there were still 950

of Contra aid

tri Iglitzin said
motorists "have
'd and signs. It's
ow we're here."
interfere with
t loss center, he
originally wan-

ted to close the entire building. -
If Reagan's aid package passes
Congress, Iglitzin said, LASC will par-
ticipate in further demonstrations to
be held around the country by
National Pledge of Resistance, a
nation-wide peace organization.

ht sponsor quits
mounting debts

)m Page 1)
nience," he said,
took leave from
to participate in
d as 5,000 demon-
rashington D.C.
okeswoman said
marchers as of

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Friday, but California Highway
Patrolmen put the number at 511 last
Thursday. The march started with
1,200 participants.
PRO-Peace said it would also help
any marchers that wanted to go
home.
COLD weather and rain have
caused mild cases of hypothermia for
some marchers, and two others had
their motor homes repossessed.
Organizers blamed greater-than-
expected start-up costs, on several
vendors demanding full payment in

cash for supplies rather than in-
stallment payments, according to a
march spokesman.
Before the march began the
organization was receiving about
$22,000 a day, according to PRO-
Peace spokeswoman Torie Osborn.
But by the end of February, donations
fell to $5,000 a day. At that time the
group had only collected about one-
fifth of the $15 million it needed to
complete the trek.
Winkelman's parents said their
daughter had not lost hope when they
spoke to her on Friday night -
probably because she was too busy in
day-long meetings trying to
reorganize the march effort.
Both Winkelmans were glad the
marchers have postponed their desert
hike until they collect enough supplies
and funding.

IN BRIEF
COMPILED FROM ASSOCIATED PRESS AND
UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL REPORTS
French conservatives win
control of parliament
PARIS - The two main conservative parties, with the help of minor
rightest groups, won an absolute majority of seats in the National Assem-
bly in yesterday's elections to end five years of Socialist rule, according
to computer projections.
If confirmed, the conservative victory means Socialist President Fran-
cois Mitterand will be forced to govern with a hostile Parliament and
premier for the last two years of his term.
The Socialists were projected to win 211-214 seats, remaining the
largest single party in France but without enough seats to form a gover-
nment.
The biggest surprise was the performance of the extreme right
National Front, projected to enter the Assembly for the first time with
about 30 seats, fewer that the Communists because National Front votes
were concentrated in certain areas. The Communists were projected to
win 40 seats, and small leftist parties two.
State pays millions in courts
LANSING - A Senate Fiscal Agency report indicated yesterday that
Michigan taxpayers in 1985 picked up the tab for more than $28 million in
lost state court judgements.
The Detroit News said the report also showed that millions of dollars in
additonal court judgments remain unpaid while the state pursues ap-
peals.
And if that's not enough, the Agency also said there are more than 8,300
unresolved suitsmpending against the state seeking $4.78 billion in
damages and compensation.
The Agency report indicated that most payouts were compensation for
personal injuries and property damage caused by state negligence. They
include such things as improper highway design, negligent supervision of
psychiatric patients in state facilities or job discrimination against state
workers. Contract disputes also account for a number of payouts.
In the last six years, Michigan has paid out from $6.61 million to $26.7
million annually to satisfy court judgments and negotiated settlements.
Govt. statistics mislead public
WASHINGTON - Many of the nation's economic statistics are presen-
ting a misleading picture of the economy they are supposed to measure, a
congressional study said yesterday.
The study prepared for the Joint Economic Committee found that
government statistics-gathering operations had fallen victim to Reagan
administration budget cuts and outdated practices.
"Business leaders and government policy makers are operating in the
dark because of the poor and declining quality of government information
gathering," Sen. Paul Sarbanes (D-Md.) said in releasing the study.
"Many of our statistical programs are no longer adequate to keep pace
with our rapidly changing economy."
The study was prepared by Courtenay Slater, chief economist at the
Commerce Department during the Carter adminstration.
"Increasingly, the usefulness of the data produced is impaired by
protracted delays in updating statistical concepts to reflect the changing
structure of the economy," she said. "As a result, information about new
industries and rapidly growing economic sectors is often scanty and
sometimes misleading."
NASA squanders millions
MIAMI - NASA has wasted millions of dollars on space shuttle con-
tracts because of excessive markups on parts, freeloading contractors
and loafing work crews, a newspaper reported yesterday.
Audit records show the space agency routinely paid $30 for pins that
should cost three cents, paid $158,000 for a $5,000 cooling fan and paid $256
to fly a contractor's dogs coast-to-coast, the Miami Herald reported.
Up to one-third of NASA's budget, which was more than $8.3 billion last
year, is wasted, estimated George Spanton, a former Defense Contract
Audit Agency supervisor of contractor filings at Kennedy Space Center in
CapThe charges, backed by dozens of NASA and DCAA audit reports ob-
tained by the Herald under the Freedom of Information Act, follow
recent disclosures by NASA that it had cut back on its safety staff,
slashed shuttle reliability programs and abandoned backup safety
features because of lack of funds.
Officials for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, stung
by recent criticism from the presidential commission investigating the
Jan. 28 explosion of the space shuttle Challenger, denied NASA is wasting
taxpayers' dollars.
Reagan rallies for Contra aid
WASHINGTON - President Reagan, declaring that the United States
"must deny the Soviet Union a beachhead in North America," said last
night that aid to Nicaraguan rebels will provide a "defense of our own
southern frontier."
Pressing for public support with a nationally televised address four
days before the House votes on his $100-billion aid proposal, Reagan
urged his country not to ignore "the malignancy in Managua until it
spread and becomes a mortal threat to the entire New World."
Reagan charged members of the ruling Sandinista regime in
Nicaragua with selling illegal drugs to Americans, using their country as a
terrorist command post and threatening the security of the Western

alliance by seeking to spread revolution through Central America to the
Panama Canal.
In a Democratic Party reply prepared for broadcast immediately
following the president's address, Sen. James Sasser of Tennessee said
the Democrats agree with Reagan "that the Sandinista government has
betrayed the promise of its revolution, has suppressed the freedom of its
own people, and has supported subversion in El Salvador," but believe
"that the president is seizing military options before he has exhausted the
hope of a peaceful solution."
hie fStthIgan aIg
Vol. XCVI - No. 112
The Michigan Daily (ISSN 0745-967 X) is published Monday through
Friday during the fall and winter terms. Subscription rates: September
through April-$18 in Ann Arbor; $35 outside the city. One term-$10 in
town; $20 outside the city.
The Michigan Daily is a member of The Associated Press and subscribes
to United Press International, Pacific News Service, Los Angeles Times
Syndicate, and College Press Service.

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A A

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
Auditions
Chicago
Director, Jim Posante, musical directors Dill Murrell, John
Tartaglia and choreographer, TeDee Theofil, have announ-
ced that auditions for the big musical, CHICAGO, will be
held on March 16, 17, 18 at AACT. Production dates are
May 7-10. Roles include:

" 2 females (about 30) who can sing, dance, and act
* 1 older female (prison matron)
(sings and acts like Sophie Tucker)
" 6 women (any age) who can act and move
* 2 men (over 30) who can sing, dance, and act
* 1 man who plays Mary Sunshine, the gossip
columnist, who must be able to sing soprano
* men's singing, moving chorus
0 men's singing, dancing chorus
Auditions at AACT Bldg., 338 S. Main St.
Those trying out need to bring a prepared song with music.
Dancers must wear leotards and tights. You must be at the
building promptly at 7:30 the night you are auditioning to get
instructions.MARCH 16 -7:30 dancers
MARCH 17-18 - character roles and chorus
Any questions, please call AA CT1-4 p.m.
662-9405

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* U
1/2lb. HAMBURGERI
* U
COOKED TO ORDER U
* U
* U
1/2 LB. FRESH GROUND CHUCK STEAK".
ON KAISER ROLL WITH FRENCH FRIES with this coupon
AND COLE SLAW
M ONDAYS 4:30 - 10:00 p.m. (expires March 10th, 1986) "
THIS WEEK AT GUILD HOUSE
802 MONROE
A ANN ARBOR, MI 48104
GUILD HOUSE
WRITERS SERIES
Monday, March 17 8:00 p.m.
KATHRYN GLASGOW and ANDREW TANG
READING FROM THEIR WORKS
*Cosponsored by the Michigan Student Assembly
FOR MORE INFO CALL 662-5189

March 21

Noon Forum

March 19

6 - 7 p.m.

"Current Moods and Strategies
of the Peace Movement"
JANIS MICHAEL
Mich. Alliance
F/ Disarmament

RICE & BEANS NIGHT
$2 requested
Proceeds for material aid to
Central America.

L

L-

r -r z

m m

&MEDICAL QUESTIONS? CALL TEL-MED!

LTHANFORMATIC

ANN ARBOR

668-1551

" YPSILANTI 434-6120

9 HOWELL

548-2832

vI

You can listen to any of the medically accurate tapes listed below, FREE,
in the privacy of your home, by calling TEL-MED. Ask the TEL-MED operator for
each tape by its number. TEL-MED service hours are Monday through Friday,
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. & Saturday noon to 8 p.m.

Masturbation, 174
Marijuana, 137
Coping With Stress, CL 38
Coping With Depression, CL 432
Coping With Loneliness, CL 32
Personal Problems:

Am I Really Pregnant? 12
Unplanned Pregnancy:
Where to Get Help, 32
Birth Control, 54
Birth Control Pills, 55
Abortion, 24
Hvaiene for Women. 39

AIDS, 571
Sexual Response:
Female, 898; Male, 1050
Homosexuality: Lesbians, 5000
Homosexuality: Gay Men, 5001
Headaches, 35
Uton.ae.

Editor in Chief...............ERIC MATTSON
Managing Editor ........ RACHEL GOTTLIEB
News Editor.............. JERRY MARKON
Features Editor............CHRISTY RIEDEL
NEWS STAFF: Eve Becker, Melissa Birks, Laura
Bischoff, Rebecca Blumenstein, Marc Carrel. Dov
Cohen. Laura Coughlin, Tim Daly, Nancy
Driscoll, Rob Earle, Amy Goldstein, Susan Grant,
Stephen Gregory, Steve Herz, Linda Holler, Mary
Chris Jaklevic, Phillip Levy, Michael Lustig, Amy
Mindell, Caroline Muller, Kery Murakami, Jill
Oserowsky, Joe Pigott Kurt Serbus, Martha Sevet-
son, Cheryl Wistrom, Jackie Young.
Opinion Page Editor ........... KAREN KLEIN
Associate Opinion Page Editor... HENRY PARK
OPINION PAGE STAFF: Gayle Kirshenbaum,
Peter Ephross, David Lewis, Peter Mooney,
Susanne Skubik.
Arts Editor ...............NOELLE BROWER
Associate Arts Editor.........BETH FERTIG
Books..................REBECCA CHUNG
Film ..................SETH FLICKER
Features ...................... ALAN PAUL

Sports Editor.............BARB McQUADE
Associate Sports Editors. DAVE ARETHA,
MARK BOROWSKY, RICK KAPLAN,
ADAM MARTIN, PHIL NUSSEL
SPORTS STAFF: Emily Bridgham, Debbie
deFrances, Liam Flaherty, Jon Hartmann, Darren
Jasey. Christian Martin, Scott Miller, Greg
Molzon, Jerry Muth, Adam Ochlis, Duane Roose,
Jeff Rush, Adam Schefter, Scott Shaffer, Pete
Steinert, Douglas Volan.
Business Manager......DAWN WILLACKER
Display Sales Manager ...CYNTHIA NIXON
Assistant Sales Manager.. KATHLEEN O'BRIEN
Classified Manager ...GAYLA BROCKMAN
Finance Manager..........MIKE BAUGHMAN
Marketing Manager.........JAKE GAGNON
DISPLAY SALES: Eda Banjakul, Diane Bloom,
Phil Educate, Albert Ellenich, Debbie Feit, Ma-
son Franklin, Heidi Freeman, Traci Garfinkel,
John Graff, Jennifer Heyman, Beth Horowitz,
Parker Moon, Carol Muth, Debra Silverman,
David Zirin.

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