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March 14, 1986 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-14

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The Michigan Daily - Friday, March 14, 1986-- Page 3

'U' seeks state funds for engineering laboratory

By CAROLINE MULLER
A high-tech laboratory in the new
engineering building currently under con-
struction on North Campus will be equipped
to meet its minimum needs only if the state
approves an upcoming supplemental ap-
propriation bill.
University officials have been lobbying
since last September for a $3.3 million ad-
dition to the fiscal 1986 state budget, of
which $2.3 million will go toward purchasing
equipment for the Electrical Engineering
and Computer Sciences building's Solid
State Electronics Laboratory. The facility
will be used for electronics and optics
research.

THE supplemental bill was made
necessary by cuts last summer in the
University's share of the Research Ex-
cellence Fund, a special bill proposed by
Gov. Blanchard to aid the state's top
research universities.
Even with the state money, however, the
engineering college would still need $4-5
million more to meet the estimated $8.5
million necessary to provide a fully equip-
ped laboratory. University officials never
included equipment in their funding request
for the entire building, relying instead on
private donations.
A current campaign to secure private

funds has raised around $1.5 million.
"WE ARE hopeful that the bill is going to
pass the legislature in the next couple of
weeks," said University vice president for
state relations Richard Kennedy.
"I only give it a 50-50 chance, no better,"
said state sen. Lana Pollack (D-Ann Arbor).
"We got burned last time. This time it's
hard to be optimistic. We don't have the
solid promises.,
Pollack said she didn't know when both
houses will vote on the bill, which will sup-
plement other areas in addition to higher
education.
WHATEVER THE vote's outcome,

engineering officials plan to continue in-
definitely the private funding campaign un-
til the optimal $8.5 million is reached.
"We are clearly going to be heavily
dependent on external funding," said
engineering associate dean for academic af-
fairs Charles Vest.
"We're just about ready to go out and
launch a more focused campaign," added
professor Kendall Wise, who is leading the
college's drive to collect cash and new or
used equipment from private companies
willing to either sponsor University resear-
ch programs or donate equipment volun-
tarily.

The EECS building was originally con-
tracted to be finished by the fall of 1987, but
due to "aggressive construction," com-
pletion has been moved up one year, accor-
ding to Victor Cardona, architect for Smith,
Minchman, and Gryllis, the firm that
designed the new building. University of-
ficials had hoped the building would be
ready for classes this May.
All EECS and Technical Communication
courses for Fall 1986 have been tentatively
scheduled in East Engineering, and will be
moved one by one to North Campus when
construction is completed.

Educators ponder

Protesters march to Pursell's office, plant crosses

I d rise
WASHINGTON (AP) - What began
as a debate at a college conference on
the impact of federal budget cuts took
a new turn Thursday when several
academics questioned why tuition
keeps climbing faster than inflation.
"In higher education the public is
asked to just sit back and take it,"
said Chester Finn Jr., a Reagan ad-
ministration assistant secretary of
education. "I don't think it's
resonable to assume, frankly, that
every time a college fixes its roof that
the federal taxpayers should provide
more student aid."
FINN, in the minority when
the four-man panel at the
American Association for Higher
Education meeting started discussing
the wisdom of reducing federal aid,
suddenly found himself in the
majority.
College costs have risen twice the
rate of inflation during the 1980s. It
now costs nearly $5,000 to spend a
year at a public four-year college and
nearly $10,000 at the typical private
institution.
Harold Howe, II, a Harvard lec-
turer and former U.S. commissioner
of education in the Johnson ad-
ministration, said, "Higher education
institutions generally are not known
for their efficiency of operation.
There's probably a good deal that can
be done."
"THE TROUBLE is that there;
are happy customs of the
academic profession that

ge oftuitionj
get in the way, like being on
tenure. I'll bet there isn't a college
here that doesn't have somebody on
its faculty that it wishes would go
away," said Howe. Laughter erupted
in the crowd of more than 600
academics present.
Frank Newman, president of the
Education Commission of the States,
said, "higher education has to ad-
dress that (inflation) question."
But Robert Atwell, president of the
American Council on Education, a
lobbying group for colleges, came to
the defense of campus ad-
ministrators.
TUITION will keep rising faster
than inflation, he said, because
colleges are "playing catch-up ball on
faculty salaries," their facilities are
deteriorating and revenues other than
tuition are flat.
"I think that colleges and univer-
sities are on the whole very well
managed," said Atwell.
"It's quite fashionable to say that
we're inefficient and to dwell on that
and be kind of proud of a sort of
tweedy inefficiency that I don't think
exists," said Atwell, former president
of Pitzer College in California. "A lot
of that disappeared a long time ago...I
don't think we ought to flagellate our-
selves."
"But that tenured professor is still
there," said Howe.
The Reagan administration has
proposed cutting the $8 billion student
aid budget by 25 percent.

(Continued from Page 1)
information to expedite a possible
booking process.
That proved unnecessary, however,
for police initially threatened to
arrest the protestors "in five
minutes" for tresspassing but backed
off for no apparent reason. A police
spokesman refused to comment on
why no arrests were made.
Among signs stating "Rep. Pursell,
you can hide from us, but not from
your conscience! No aid to the con-
tras" and protesters singing "No
more aid to the contras, we shall not
be moved, like a tree standing by the
water, we shall not be moved,"
protesters called the rally a victory,
though much of their energy
dissipated during their three hour
wait outside the office.
"THEY didn't arrest us because

we're not breaking the law, said
graduate student Thea Lee, "This is
an admission of guilt on the part of
Carl Pursell. He doesn't want to stand
up in court and decide who's breaking
the law more: him or us."
Lee, speaking at the rally, said Pur-
sell's refusal to respond to the
protests, letters, phone calls, and
requests to hold a town meeting "can
only be seen as a gesture of utmost
disrespect for constituents."
She said visits to Pursell's other
district offices in Plymouth and
Jackson yesterday demonstrated that
"it's his whole district that is against
the way he's voting."
"There are real people giving real
lives because of his votes," said Peter
Rossett, co-author of the Nicaraguan
Reader, and a speaker at the rally.
"These crosses represent the

thousands of Nicaraguan civilians
that our tax dollars have helped kill.
We feel their deaths are on our con-
sciences."
LASC plans to demonstrate against

Pursell's support for the Contras
again today and early next week, until
the bill comes up for a vote on Wed-
nesday.

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Tryouts held for calendkar

(Continued from Page 1)
Roseman is modeling his project o
the Men of USC Calendar, whic
grossed its creators $800,000 last year
DESPITE charges by some that hi
venture is a sexist one, many of th
prospective models said they feel th
calendar's purpose is to represent th
University in a positive sense.
"I think University girls wanted t
do something like this," said LSE
sophomore Michelle Nesbitt. "A lot o
girls would like to be in a calenda
portraying U of M; that's thei
school."
Trapp said the competition is "pret
ty stiff." Like herself, many of th
prospects have modeling experience.
Some of the models remarked tha
there should be more than thre
women on the fifteen-member judgin
panel. Anastasia Condit, an LS)
sophomore, thought seven or eigh
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The Pryor Foundation will present this award for the best prepared,
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Entries must be submitted by 5 p.m. on April 1, 1986, to Ms. Evelyn
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QUESTIONS? CALL MIKE LOPEZ 996-9286

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