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March 13, 1986 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-13

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The Michigan Daily - Thursday, March 13, 1986-Page 5

'U' to share area study centers

with 25
By MELISSA BIRKS
Students and faculty fr
colleges around the nation n
using the University's six
Western area study centers1
plement their studies in a pr
beginning this summer.
"It's primarily a program
will make accessible to stude
faculty the remarkable resour
have here," said John Eadie,
director for the Program for It
stitutional Collaboration in
Studies.
THE UNIVERSITY'S si:
Western area studies pro
focus on Japan, the Soviet Un
Eastern Europe, China, Sou
Southeast Asia, the Near Ea
Africa.
"No University even comes
the resources we have," Eadie
At least three professor
already been offered fello
allowing them to utilize theI
sity's resources during a h,
sabbatical or a shorter stay. TI
five professors may participa
year.
WHILE IN the prograr
visiting faculty members
granted nearly one-half their
salary through the program's
according to William Kinca
program's executive director.
Kincaid said the program i
at achieving three goals for

colleges aro1
faculty: expanding their knowledge
om 25 by using the University's research
nay be facilities; supplementing their area of
x non- study with another language; and
to sup- curriculum development that will im-
rogram pact the professor's work at his home
school.
which Fifteen qualified students from
nts and other schools will receive $1,000 to
rces we cover part of tuition and boarding ex-
project penses while participating in inten-
nter-In- sive summer language programs.
n Area The summer institute enables
students to use the University's
research facilities, obtain access to
x non- the area studies library, and take
grams area studies classes.
ion and "Some students would be able to
ith and participate in the summer program
st, and who otherwise wouldn't be available
because they don't have the money,"
close to Eadie said.
said. According to Robert Stauffer,
s have a sociology prof. at Kalamazoo
wships College, the program will benefit
Univer- smaller colleges with limited resour-
alf-year ces in non-Western studies.
Three to Stauffer noted that Kalamazoo
te each college has no non-Western study
programs. "With what's going on in the
m, the world, Asia is an economic com-
will be petitor, it's becoming more important
annual to incorporate that in the
grants, curriculum."
aid, the
STAUFFER added that faculty at
s aimed Kalamazoo College are receptive to
visiting the idea, and that one Indian studies

tnd nation
professor has already applied for a
fellowship.
The program can potenially alter
and add to other colleges' curricula
through the interaction with Univer-
sity professors, who will then have the
opportunity to visit the other cam-
puses.
The program may also "promote
increased concern of the non-West,"
in smaller schools, Stauffer said.
Faculty members involved with the
program consider the interaction with
other colleges to be the program's
greatest asset. They say the Univer-
sity is the best place to start such a
program because smaller institutions
lack similar facilities.
"AT A research university with the
quality of University of Michigan, the
area centers certainly reflect the
quality that the university is
generally regarded as having," Kin-
caid said.
The faculty members who are gran-
ted awards from the program, which
is supported in its first five years by
the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the
Pew Trust, and the Ford Foundation,
will have to meet certain requiremen-
ts.
According to Kincaid, detailed ap-
plications have not yet been prepared
but he said that professors will
receive fellowships if they are coming
here for research-oriented work that
will have an impact on curriculum at
their own school.

Associated Press
Innovation
After 50 years of the two-stick popsicle, Popsicle Industries, Inc. of
Engelwood, N.J., announced yesterday that it will retire this culinary in-
stitution, in favor of single-stick pops. Joanna Budge, a secretary for the
company, displays the two varieties of popsicles.
PIRGIM's funding
proposal questioned

Protest had ended, demonstrators say

(Continued from Page 1)
than half of the student population.
PIRGIM has so far collected about
10,000 signatures since the signature
drive began last month, according to
Gary Kalman, a member of PIRGIM.
They need about 17,000 signatures.
But Deane Baker said "Even if
every student signed it, the regents
could still turn it down."
IN 1981 and 1983 PIRGIM petitioned
for a refusable/refundable system,
but the request was turned down by
the regents.
A six-member faculty committee
appointed by PIRGIM last year to
study possible funding systems
released a report Monday advocating
the refusable/refundable system.
"The core of PIRGIM's survival as
a student-directed organization is the
students' collective decision to im-
plement a fee for PIRGIM," the
report said.

THE REPORT also noted that while
54 percent of PIRGs nationwide that
had used the positive checkoff
donation system were discontinued
between 1980 and 1985, only 18 percent
of those funded by the negative
checkoff fee were discontinued.
Regent Thomas Roach, an attorney,
said yesterday, "The only kind (of
system) that would be legal is a
positive checkoff. You must check a
box yes."
Roach also said PIRGIM has a
"very difficult course ahead of them
in a view of the way the court has
handled the issue."
Regent James Waters, also an at-
torney, agreed with Roach and Baker
and predicted that "the majority of
the board will not support"
(PIRGIM), even if the group lobbies
for the positive checkoff system.
Waters noted that over the years,
Regent support of PIRGIM has
waned.
The remaining six regents were not
available for comment.

(Continued from Page 1)
strators leaving a protest against
Lawrence Livermore Labs.
Johnson would not comment on
exactly why the protesters had been
followed, and police and security of-
ficials have also declined to say why.
Protester Ingrid Kock, an LSA
senior who is the Michigan Student
Assembly's military researcher, said
Heatley had no reason to believe the
protesters would carry their demon-
stration elsewhere.
"HE'S lying," she said. Kock said
she had mentioned how cold it was
during the protest against Livermore's
recruitment at the engineering
placement office at the Stearns
Building.
The dozen protesters gathered at
the Stearns Building on North Cam-
pus Friday to protest recruitment by
Livermore, one of the nations largest
defense contractors. After an hour
and a half, the protesters disbanded,
some leaving in their cars, others on a
University bus.
Police and security officers
followed the protester back to Central
Campus, through campus buildings,

and finally to Shapiro's office, where
the protesters went to demand an ex-
planation for the surveillance.
PROTESTER Dmitri Iglitzin, a
third-year law student, said the only
reason the protesters went to Univer-
sity President Harold Shapiro's office
was to demand an explanation for and
an end to the surveillance.
Shapiro promised to look into the
matter and assigned the task to John-
son.
Susan Lipschutz, executive
assistant to Shapiro, said her office
has not yet received the report on the

incident and said she does not know
why the protesters were followed.
Kock and two representatives of
the American Civil Liberties Union
tried Monday to speak to the Ann Ar-
bor City Council to protest police ac-
tions and the videotaping of protesters
by security officers, but they were
denied the chance to speak until next
Monday.
MSA passed a resolution Tuesday
condemning the actions of the police
and security officers, and pledged to
put a banner on the Diag demanding
Shapiro apologize for the incident.

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