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March 10, 1986 - Image 8

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-10

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4

Page 8 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 10, 1986
Wolverines destroy Hoosiers, 80-52
(Continued from Page i)

because of its team defense. Grant
held Indiana's sharpshooting guard
Steve Alford to 15 points, and when
Alford evaded Grant, more than one
Wolverine was in his face.
"I don't think we're as bad a team
as (Michigan) made us look," said
Knight. "They really played the
game away from us. They made it
difficult for us to move the ball, and
they took a lot of things away from
us."

Included in the takeaways were 13
Michigan steals (Grant had four), 20
Indiana turnovers, and a 47-29
Michigan rebounding advantage that
simply told all.
"IT WAS our defense and our
rebounding and then our transition
game that made Indiana play our
game," Frieder said.
One key to Michigan's game was
the fast break. Earlier in the week,
Frieder had been concerned about In-

diana's quickness, but this time
Michigan kept its feet on the ac-
clerator. With the Hoosiers clanging
in at .428 from the field, the
Wolverines grabbed the rebounds,
whirred downcourt and produced
plenty of easy baskets.
"If we're running, and just playing
hard, we can beat almost anybody,"
said Antoine Joubert, another double
figure (16) contributor. "If we're not
running, we're kind of suspect. That
creates turnovers 'cause we're stan-
ding and not moving."
MICHIGAN succumbed to some
inertia in the second half, but that
came courtesy of fatigue. Frieder felt
his club's offense fell stagnant over

the second 20 minutes, but the
Wolverines were still able to extend
their lead. When Tarpley completed a
three-point play at 9:54 of the second
half, Michigan was up by 22, and it
was obvious the conference crown
would reside in Ann Arbor for another
year.
Still, the Wolverines weren't
finished. They flirted with a 30-point
margin before Frieder removed the
heavies and inserted Steve Stoyko and
Ron Gibas.
One heavy who paced the
Wolverines and led the cheers was
Tarpley. The senior center was sim-
ply unstoppable, collecting a game
high 21 points and 11 rebounds in his

farewell Crisler performance.
AFTER BEING maligned all
season for deflated statistics and poor
play, Tarpley showed why he deser-
ved All-Big Ten honors for the second
consecutive year.
Said Frieder: "It's amazing to me

that Tarpley has not been Big Ten
Player of the Week all year."
Amazing really wasn't the word.
Last year, Michigan's 17-game win
streak and the title it produced were
amazing. This year, the Wolverines
simply completed the picture.
This time, it was clear.

BARB"s

i

ARBS
By BIrh McOuade

4

Championship atmosphere.

. .

Tournament Update
Michigan begins its NCAA tour-
nament run Friday at Minneapolis
against the University of Akron.
The Zips, champions of the Ohio
Valley Conference, finished with a
22-7 overall record.
Michigan is seeded second in the
Midwest Regional behind Kansas.
The regional, which will be held at
Minneapolis and Dayton, also
features Georgetown, North
Carolina State, Notre Dame and
Michigan State.
A first round victory for the
Wolverines would pit them against
the winner of the Iowa State-Miami
of Ohio game. A Michigan-Iowa
State matchup would see Cyclone
coach Johnny Orr going against his
former school. Orr led the
Wolverines to the NCAA finals
against Indiana in 1976.

Big Ten Standings
Conf. Overall
WL WI.
x-MICHIGAN ......... 14 4 27 4
Indiana ............... 13 5 21 7
Michigan State.........12 6 21 7
Purdue ................ 11 7 22 9
Illinois ................ 11 7 21 9
Iowa .................. 10 8 20 11
Ohio State ............. 8 10 14 14
Minnesota ............. 5 13 15 16
Wisconsin..............4 14 12 16
Northwestern ......... 2 16 8 20
x-conference champion
Scores
Duke 68, Georgia Tech 67
Kansas 73, Iowa Stateh71
Kentucky 83, Alabama 72
Louisville 88, Memphis State 79
Texas Tech 67, Texas A&M 63

. . . inspires Blue
T HAT FEELING was in the air.
That certain buzz of anticipation that it's all on the line. There was
no calm before this storm. It was a frenzy.
The crowd was electric before Michigan's Big Ten championship vic-
tory over Indiana Saturday, and so were the Wolverines.
"When we were in the huddle getting ready to come on the court at the
beginning of the game, I saw fire in a lot of people's eyes," said Michigan
forward Rob Henderson. "It was an exciting, pulsating feeling because it
came down to the last game."
Entering Saturday's contest, Michigan and Indiana had identical 13-4
conference records, tying them for first place. The schedule maker
couldn't have planned it any better. The do-or-die situation possessed the
Wolverines and even had the usually placid Crisler Arena fans screaming
to demonic proportions.
(But just in case, arena announcer Howard King cued with a countdown
before CBS began its national telecast.)
The resounding victory saw Michigan accomplish something it hasn't
managed all season - relentless play for 40 minutes. No lapses where in-
tensity was low. Despite shooting just 44 percent from the floor, the
Wolverines crushed Bobby Knight's team with aggressiveness.
That's the kind of pace Michigan must maintain if it is to follow that
mythical road to Dallas.
"This game was a good game for us going into the tournament because
it was a pressure-type game and we came out and played strong," said
Michigan forward Richard Rellford.
Michigan's performance even earned praise from a disappointed
Knight.
"They have the opportunity to really be an outstanding basketball team
because they do everything that a team has to be able to do," he said. "If
they can get everything together and play hard, then they'll have a hell of
a chance to go a long way in the NCAA tournament ."
Three years ago the Indiana head man entered the young Wolverines'
locker room in Bloomington, after Michigan had been pounded by the
Hoosiers.
"I remember him talking to our players afterwards," said Michigan
head coach Bill Frieder. "He told them 'you guys are an excellent
basketball team. You're young. If you hang together you're going to be a
fine team someday.' He really gave- them words of encouragement. I
think it meant something to these kids coming from Bob Knight."
"He blew my mind when he came in there," Rellford recalled. "He
came in the locker room and he was telling us 'guys, you gave us the best
first half we've ever had.' We were like, man, how were we supposed to
act? I think Bobby did know something. I think he knew we were a good
team. Three years later, we're Big Ten champions for the second year in
a row."
The gruff Knight handed out praise sparingly despite the realization of
his prophesy Saturday, however, concentrating his efforts instead on in-
sulting Michigan athletic director Don Canham. The Don Rickles of
college basketball railed Canham for everything from a dirty locker
room to reaping the rewards of gate receipts for Knight's presence at
Crisler. Vintage Bobby.
The 15-year Indiana coach did have a valid point about the Wolverines,
though, noting their see-saw intensity.
"They played awfully well. Michigan doesn't always play like that," he
said of Saturday's performance. "This wasn't just a game to end the.
season. They played for the championship today. That's the one thing I
don't think they do. I don't think they play hard all the time."
Knight's message is clear. Without the conference title on the line,
without it being the senior's last game at home, without its own fans
behind it, Michigan must find within itself the desire to play to its poten-
tial in the tournament. The Wolverines learned from Knight three years
ago. If they're wise, they'll learn from him again.
meinoka

UM, W
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Daily Photo by DAN HABIB
Michigan senior Richard Rellford plays above the rim after blocking out
Indiana's Andre Harris during Saturday's action. Strong rebounding was
one of the keys to the Wolverines' 80-52 rout over the Hoosiers.
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