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March 10, 1986 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-03-10

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The Michigan Daily - Monday, March 10, 1986 -Page 3

I

11

I 1

IT

Students stage rock contest to combat MS

What's happening
around Ann Arbor

By ANNE CHAPPLE
Michigan students rocked around the
clock Friday evening to raise money
to help fight Multiple Sclerosis.
"Students Against MS" staged its
annual fund-raising bash at the
Michigan Union ballroom. Thisayear's
program, which generated $6,000 for
Multiple Sclerosis research and

rehabilitation programs, featured a
lip-synch contest sponsored by MTV.
THE "ROCK Alike" event attracted
about a dozen performers who lip-
synched their versions of hits from
stars like Tina Turner, Madonna, and
The Andrew Sisters.
After the performances, students
cast ballots for the three best acts.

First place went to Sue McDonald and
Dave Feikens, who performed "Stop
Draggin' My Heart Around" as Stevie
Nicks and Tom Petty.
Matt Czajka took second place as a
hyper-energetic Mick Jagger perfor-
ming "Going to a Go-Go," and "Blues
Brothers" Barry Reiger and Mike

Vetowich took third place with their
rendition of "Everybody Needs Som-
ebody."
Winners McDonald and Feikens will
represent the University at a regional
"Rock Alike" competition to be held
later this year. MTV will sponsor a
live concert on the campus of the
school whose representatives win the
national competition.

Performance
Stratford Festival Touring Company
- Michigan Union Cultural
Programs 10 a.m., Residential
College; 3 p.m., Concordia College,
4090 Geddes, (764-6498).
Members from the Stratford
Festival in Ontario, Canada will
present scenes from this year's
producions of Cymbeline, Pericles,
and A Winter's Tale.
5th Annual Seventeen
Magazine/General Motors National
Concerto Competition -rSchool of
Music, 8p.m., Hill Auditorium, (763-
4726).'
Winners of the violin, piano, and
trumpet contests will compete for
the grand prize, a chance to perform
with a major American orchestra.
The finalists will be accompanied by
the University Symphony Or-
chestra, conducted by Gustav
Meier.
r Bars and Clubs
The Ark - (761-1451) - Saline Big
Band.
Bird of Paradise (662-8310) - Paul
Vornhagen and Friends, Latin jazz.
The Blind Pig - (996-8555) -
Camper Van Beethoven, rock 'n'
roll.
The Earle (994-0211) - Larry
Manderville, solo piano.
Mr. Flood's Party (995-2132) -
Grand Mal, avant-garde,
The Nectarine Ballroom (994-5436)
- New Music, DJ Roger LeLievre.
Rick's American Cafe (996-2747)
- Wild Woodys, rockabilly.
Speakers
David Detlefson - "The Ex-
perimental Studies of Electron
Transfer: Intramolecular Ap-
proaches," Chemistry, 4 p.m., 1200
Chemistry Bldg.
Rosa Parks - Bursley Hall
Residence Staff, 8 p.m., Cafeteria,
Bursley Hall.
Mohammad Darouwshe - "Life
as an Arab in Israel," Near
Eastern and North African Studies,
noon, Commons Room, Lane Hall.
Patricia Carden - "The Napoleonic
Pictorial Tradition and Tolstoy's
War and Peace," Russian and East
European Studies/Slavic Language
and Literature, 4 p.m., Lecture
room 2, MLB.
Michael Meyers, Ingrid Tomey -
Guild House Writers Series, 8 p.m.,
802 Monroe.
Gary Hawes - "Two views of
Development," International

Development Forum, 7:30 p.m.,
Kuenzel Room, Union.
R. Kent Greenawalt - "Abortion,
Distributive Justice, and Sectarian
Education," Law School, 4 p.m., 120
Hutchins Hall.
Interviewing Lecture Career
Planning & Placement, 4:10 p.m.,
Lecture room 1, NMLB.
Radin - Lecture and demon-
stration, 8 p.m., room D, League.
Adolfo Perez Esquivel -
"Liberation Technology, Non-
Violence and the Struggle for Human
Rights," 7:30 p.m., Hale
Auditorium, School of Business Ad-
ministration.
Thomas Fricks - "Another Kind
of Household Formulation System:
The Tamang Stem Family in Com-
parative Perspective," noon, 1225 S.
University.
Ana Mari Cauce- "Social Com-
petence: An Interactional Model."
Psychology, 4 p.m., W. Conf. Room,
Rackham.
Robert Greenberg - "Geometry
as Derivation of Design Solutions,"
Art and Architecture, 12:30 p.m.,
Auditorium, Art and Architecture
Bldg.
John Sinacori - "Visual and
Motion Perception in Relationto
Simulator Design," NASA Center of
Excellence, 3:30 p.m., 115
Aerospace Engineering Bldg.
Robert Young - "Teaching Studen-
ts toThink,"7p.r., 109E. Madison.
Meetings

Livermore protesters tailed by police, security2

(Continued from Page 1)
Friday and discovered campus
security officers had locked the
building 15 minutes earlier.
While temperatures peaked at 18
degrees, the protesters were not
allowed in the building.
ANN ARBOR police captain Ken-
Management and the Job Search -
Career Planning & Placement
program, 4:10 p.m., Student Ac-
tivities Bldg.
Introductory Practice Inter-
viewing - Career Planning &
Placement program, 3:10 p.m.,
Student Activities Bldg.
Intuition and Healing - Canter-
bury House open class, 8 p.m., 218 N.
Division.
Basic Concepts of Database
Management - Microcomputer
Education Workshop, 8:30 a.m., 4003
School of Education Bldg.
Basic Concepts of Telecom-
munications - Microcomputer
Education Workshop, 10:30 a.m.,
4003 School of Education Bldg.
Macintosh Disk and File
Management - Microcomputer
Education workshop, 3 p.m., 3001
School of Education Bldg.
Marvin Hagler vs. John Mugabi:
Thomas Hearns vs. James Shuler -
Major Events live closed-circuit
telecast, Michigan Theater.
Women's Tennis - University of
Toledo, 3 p.m., Huron Valley Tennis
Club.
Tutoring in math, science, and
engineering - Tau Beta Pi, 7 p.m.,
307 Undergraduate Library; 8 p.m.,
2332 Bursley Hall.
Barriers and Boundaries: Com-
municating With Foreign Visitors -
HRD workshop, 8:30 a.m.
Supervising Temporary and Work
Study Employees - HRD workshop,
1 p.m.
On-Line Transaction - HRD
workshop, 8:15 & 10:15.
Tae Kwon Do practice - 6 p.m.,
2275 CCRB.
Square dance lessons - A-Squares,
7 p.m., Union.
Bible Study - Wesley Foundation,
6 p.m., 602 E. Huron.

neth Klinge said University officials
called the police before the protest in
anticipation of a disturbance.
Responding to demands of the
protesters, Leo Heatley, director of
Public Safety and Security, said the
Stearns Building was closed to the
public to prevent disruption of the in-
terviews.
"We're not going to allow aprotest
in the area," he said, adding that the
University has the right to close
buildings to the public when normal
activities are threatened with
disruption.
Students interviewing with Liver-
more and other companies said the
protesters did not bother themr,
however.
AFTER AN hour and a half, the
protesters disbanded, riding a carr-
pus bus fromBaits housing to Central
campus, followed by a police officer
and a security officer in an Ann Arbor
police car.
After being followed to Central
Challenger
debris found
(Continued from Pagei )
"On Saturday morning, after
securing operations during the night
for safety reasons, the USS Preser-
ver, whose divers are thoroughly
briefed on debris identification and
who have participated in similar
recovery operations, began to work,"
a NASA statement said.
"Subsequent dives provided
positive identification of Challenger
crew compartment debris and the
existence of crew remains.'

Campus and through University
buildings, some protesters went to
Shapiro's office to demand an ex-
planation.
"If any security officers followed
people for no reason, that's totally
inappropriate," Shapiro said.
Shapiro refused to meet with the

protesters a second time to discuss
the incident until he could investigate
the matter further. I
Heatley said the protesters were
followed as a matter of routine
security, but would not say who calleq
the police or who authorized the sur
veillance of the protesters.

I/M
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Buy 2 or more of Mrs. Peabody's cookies
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a FREE beverage! I
Open tilli p.m. daily PRESENTED WITH PUCHASE
715 N. University OFFERVALDTHROUGH
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Multiple Sclerosis
Counseling group;
Others group, 7 p.m.,
United Way.

Society -
Significant
Washtenaw

AT&T
PERSONAL COMPUTERS
$2 million overstock of new AT&T 6300 PC's
MUST BE SOLD to make room in out warehouse.
All computers are fully IBM
compatible and twice as fast.
COMPLETE SYSTEMS INCLUDE

Alpha Phi Alpha - 7 p.m., Union.
Armenian Students Cultural
Association - 7:30 p.m., Union.
LSA Faculty - 4:10 p.m., Aud. 4,
MLB.
Society for Creative Anachronism
- 7 p.m., East Quad.
Furthermore
Women's Rugby Practice - 8 p.m.,
Coliseum.
How Shall We Then Live? -
Francis Schaeffer's Film Series,
7:30 p.m., Aud. C, Angell Hall.
The Development of Musical
Talent - Psychology/School of
Music symposium, 9 a.m., Rackham
Auditorium.
Balancing Priorities: Time

- AT&T 6300 PC
- Dual 360K floppy drives ($2190)
or
10MB hard disk/360K floppy ($3125)
- Tile and swivel Green Monitor
- Keyboard
- 640K RAM

- High Resolution Graphics
- Parallel Printer Port
- Serial Communications Port
- Mouse Port
- Clock with battery back up
- MS-DOS/GW BASIC with manuals

We also carry an extensive line of modems,
printers and other peripherals.
HURON LEASING INC.
Ann Arbor * 996-9165
Ask for Denise

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Attention Engineering Undergraduate Students
1986 Landes Prize Announcement
Undergraduate students currently registered in the Engineering
College are eligible to compete for the George M. Landes Prize ($800). This
is an award presented annually to an undergraduate student who
demonstrates excellence of both technical work and the presentation of
that work in written or graphic form The prize is presented in memory of
George M. Landes, a 1977 graduate of the Mechanical Engineering
Department and Ford Motor Company engineer who was killed in an
automobile accident in 1981.
To enter, a student must submit a single piece of technical work.
This presentation can be a technical article, design report, piece of
technical journalism, or any other presentation of technical
work--written, graphic, or some combination of communication media

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