100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 09, 1986 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1986-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Hockey
vs. Bowling Green
Saturday, 7:35 p.m.
Yost Ice Arena

SPORTS

Wrestling
vs. Notre Dame and Clarion St.
Saturday, 1 p.m.
Moved to CCRB

The Michigan Daily Thursday, January 9, 1986 Page 7

Michigan escapes, 61-59

(Continued from Page 1)
Norman canning two field goals to
bring Illinois to within four, but then
the Wolverines took over.
MICHIGAN took a 26-18 score and
turned it into a 38-18 advantage, due in
no small part to Anthony Welch's in-
tentional foul, head coach Lou Hen-
son's technical foul and a sharp,
varied Michigan defense.
Frieder showed more than a little
savvy, showing the Illini a full court
press three times in the first half.
Three times he called it, three times
Illinois threw the ball out of bounds.
Henderson played an outstanding
first half, shooting five of seven for
ten points and adding four offensive
rebounds.
BUT IN the final two minutes of the
first half, Michigan stopped playing
basketball. Looking very content with
its lead, Michigan got very sloppy and
gave away six easy points to Illinois.
The tone was set for the second half.
Illinois guards Bruce Douglas and
Glynn Blackwell simply ate the
Wolverines (Grant and Joubert in
particular) alive. Nine Illinois back-
court steals combined with 12
Michigan backcourt turnovers almost
gave away a Michigan victory. Cer-
tainly these factors humbled a cocky
squad which saw fit to rest on its

laurels in the second half.
"A NUMBER of times we lost con-
centration and he (Douglas) turned it
into a layup," said Frieder, who was
furious with his guards.
To the credit of the Illini, they ad-
justed to Michigan's swarming defen-
se and fast-break offense beautifully.
Led by Norman with 19 points, Illinois
ran a well-tuned half-court offense.
The Wolverines on half court were
simply miserable.
"We knew we couldn't run on
them," said Henson, "so we tried to
control the tempo and eliminate the
easy shots we gave them in the first
half."
Save for Henderson's heroic basket,
Henson and Illinois succeeded almost
completely. Save for Henderson, the
Wolverines were an embarrassment.

y1)evefro Ws
By Steve Wise

..
c
s
1
t
1

Daily Photo by SCOTT LITUCHY
Michigan center Roy Tarpley, who scored 14 of his team-leading 16 points
in the first half, attempts a 15-footer over Illinois' Scott Meents.

MV
Pi
lo
O'

Big Ten Standings
Conf. Overall
W L W L
ICHIGAN ........... 3 0 15 0
urdue ................ 2 0 13 2
Visconsin ............. 1 0 9 2
lichigan State ........ 1 1 10 2
>wa .................-1 1 11 4
hio State..............1 1 7 4

Blue LInes

.r .
~ J r
i l

Illinois ................
Northwestern.......
Indiana ...............
Minnesota .............

12
01
02
02

10 4
6 5
8 4
10 5

Henderson

...saves 'M'at buzzer

Pucks passed Lindgren .

PF Pts
4 4
0 0
5 6
2 14
3 13
1 19
1 0
0 3
16 59
S
ciated
prised
later
ained
1^f -

'lead not guarded..
..Frieder turns blue
THE MICHIGAN Wolverines went 15-0 last night, and head basketball
coach Bill Frieder was upset.
No, make that angry.
No, make that raging.
"They read about how great they are and how they should be number
one and it's my job to protect them and it's a lot of malarkey," Frieder
said, his voice growing to a yell with each syllable.
Then Frieder laid down the law on hyping his team in the future. His
wrath fell especially hard on the guards, whom he felt were the worst vic-
tims of their own egos.
"My guards have to learn to take care of that basketball," he bellowed.
"...I don't want anyone talking to them this week or next week !"
"And anyone who writes about how great they are is just an... inex-
perienced writer if they know anything about the Big Ten," Frieder ad-
ded, obviously holding back stronger language.
Painful experience
It doesn't take much experience to see why Frieder was incensed. The
Wolverines were inept in the second half, shooting-slightly more than 53
percent from the floor only because they lost the ball twice as many times
as they put it through the hoop and two more times than they got shots off.
"The biggest thing was the 17 turnovers in the second half and that's
ridiculous," Frieder said, again crescendoing to a roar at the last word.
Of the primary players, only the game's hero, Robert Henderson, and
Butch Wade were immune to the giveawayitis. Henderson simply played
a good game and Wade was spared by sitting down most of the second
half.
Most of the turnovers came, as Frieder's fuming indicated from
Michigan's backcourt. Gary Grant had four, Antoine Joubert eight, and
(pass the butter) Garde Thompson had four in just 10 minutes of play.
"The guards have to learn to protect the BALL! ! !" Frieder repeated
for unnecessary emphasis.
Douglas picked them clean
The biggest problem last night was they had to protect it from Illinois'
star defensive guard Bruce Douglas. The only original Illini backcourt
starter after Doug Altenberger and Tony Wysinger were knocked out
with injuries, Douglas pickpocketed the Wolverines seven times and got a
hand on at least as many other Michigan passes.
The senior point man was timely to say the least. Douglas sparked all
three fast breaks that tied the game at 59 with eight seconds, taking the
tying bucket all the way himself after a steal in Michigan's end of the
floor.
Douglas also led the comeback that cut the Wolverine lead in the final
minutes of the first half. Again, the 6-3 195-pounder had a steal or tip
leading to four of Illinois' five hoops, taking the last one in himself.
"It all started in the last three minutes of the first half," Frieder said.
"...That let them get back into the game and gave them great momentum.
going into the second half."
Frieder had his own momentum going by then. He started with simple
shaking of the head, moved into yelling during the game and time outs,
and broke into a foot stamping rage when Grant missed a fairly forced
shot.
The guards were not the only ones who raised Frieder's blood pressure.
Roy Tarpley had the team's second highest turnover total with six, prom-
pting Frieder to question the center's future.
"Tarpley put the ball on the floor too much," said Frieder, the volume
rising once again. "He wants to be a pro and if he does he's gotta learn he
can't do that."
If Frieder blasted his team anything like he did the press, it's hard to
believe Tarpley and the rest haven't learned already.

0 .

llittle scary

. , , but Lindgren didn't pass
By SCOTT G. MILLER
THE VOICES were anxious.
"If you hear of a goaltender, let us know," said assistant coach Mark
Miller to a contact in Canada.
Red Berenson was having a similar conversation with another contact.
As I waited in the hockey office to speak with Berenson, I realized the
goaltending predicament had worsened. The Wolverines netminding this
season has been inconsistent and has cost the team many games.
Recruiting a goaltender has been a major priority for Berenson and his
staff. From the urgency in the two coaches voices, it is apparent
goaltending has become the priority.
The urgency was created by the ineligibility of starting goalie Bob Lin-
dgren whose academic point average performance caused him to leave
school and relinquish his scholarship.
"It was a shock, a complete shock," said Berenson of Lindgren's
academic performance. "We have a study table four nights a week for
freshmen and sophomores and our graduate assistant coaches help the
players. We are right on top of these kids.
"There was no indication Lindgren was having problems in school. He
didn't communicate. He said everything was fine, meanwhile he was
bleeding to death. I don't think he had his heart in the school
academically as much as we thought he did."
Lindgren's departure raises questions about athletic recruitment. By
remaining in school Lindgren could have regained his eligibility and
retained his scholarship whether his grades improved or not. However,
he didn't want to make the classroom commitment. Did Berenson and his
staff make a mistake?
Berenson's recruiting philosophy is simple. "I make it clear to recruits
if they are not really interested in an academic challenge don't come to
school at Michigan," said the Wolverine head man. "Many prospects
agree. But saying something and doing something are two different
things."
Lingren said one thing and did another. It is easy for coaches to
misjudge recruits because they cannot spend enough time with the
prospective scholar-athlete due to time limiting NCAA regulations.
"We really can't tell about a recruit until he is on campus," said
Michigan athletic academic counselor Bob Clifford. "We explain to them
at orientation what is expected of them. They have to come here and want
to make it."
Other schools can hide recruits in easy academic programs to keep
them eligible. Michigan doesn't have that luxury, which makes the
coaches job harder. Berenson's counterpart, Michigan State coach Ron
Mason, has a simple task in comparison. Conversation with a couple of
Spartan players proves it. There will be no Rhodes scholars emerging
from that squad.
Berenson most likely has learned from the Lindgren ordeal, and the
flury of phone calls won't produce another question mark.
On the positive side sophomore goalie Tim Makris has reemerged as the
number one man between the pipes. This past weekend the Marlboro, MA
native showed flashes of the form that earned him Massachusetts goalie-
of-the-year honors in 1983-84.
"Makris came out of the weekend in good shape," said Berenson. "I
think he played two solid games in goal against Ferris State. If Makris'
play is any indication of the way he is going to accept (Lindgren's depar-
ture), this can be positive."
With Michigan only four points away from home-ice advantage in the
first round of the Central Collegiate Association playoffs, steady play
from Makris will be essential. Whether he will deliver remains to be seen.
Little help can be expected from the team's other goalie backup Mike
Rossi, a freshman walk-on.
Rentsa Car From Econ-Coar

Reilford .........
Wade.........
Tarpley .......
Joubert .........
Grant ...........
Henderson ......
Rice...........
Thompson ...
Team Rebounds .
TOTALS ........

MICHIGAN
MinFG/AFT/A
25 3/4 1/1
17 2/4 2/2
40 6/10 4/4
36 3/8 1/3
37 3/8 5/6
23 6/8 0/0
12 0/2 0/2
10 0/0 2/2

ILLINOIS
MinFG/A FT/A R

R
3
r
12
3
2
7
1

A
0
7
2
2
0
0

PF
3
3
4
1
2
0
0

Pts
7
6
16
7
11
12
0
2

Winters .........
Meents ..........
Welch .........
Douglas .......
Blackwell......
Norman .........
Taylor........
Hamilton ........

37
8
34
40
31
34
9
7

2/7
0/0
3/8
7/12
6/9
8/12
0/2
1/3

0/0
0/0
0/0
0/0
1/2
3/3
0/0
1/2,

5
1
4
1
3
4
0
0

A
3
1
0
0

200 23/44 15/20 31 11 14 61

Team Rebounds .1
TOTALS.........200 27/53 5/7 19 13
First half score: Michigan 42, Illinois 28
Attendance: 13,609 (sellout)

Gibson and Tigers
can't come to term

DETROIT (AP) - Detroit outfielder
Kirk Gibson's agent said yesterday
that he was preparing to begin
bargaining with other major league
teams following his client's latest
rejection of a Tigers' contract offer.
The Tigers had until 11:59 p.m.
yesterday to re-sign Gibson. But Seat-
tle agent Doug Baldwin said he spoke
early yesterday with Detroit General
Manager Bill Lajoie and "let him
know that Kirk will not accept their
offer."

BALDWIN told the Asso
Press that he "wouldn't be sur
if there was any contact"
yesterday with Lajoie.
But the agent said Gibson rem
rigidly opposed to Detroit's
standing offer of a three-year
million contract.
"He's firmer than ever abou
Baldwin said after speaking
telephone with Gibson, who wasc
honeymoon.

long-
$3.9
It it,"
via
on his

I-

/ Write On!.

Si

p

. i

MPAD
/ PV iC PCk f>
f r

t\

Take
Advantage
L\ST COURSE NUBR E OURE SECTION NO.
4fSTRUGTOR gus
DEPARTMENT /2
Simple as 1-2-3
1. Just fill it out.
2. Hand it to one of
our clerks.

What you write on is just as important as what you write with.
Ulrich's has a complete selection of Ampad writing pads.
"The Ampad Series"
16 lbs. Canary, Gold Fibres watermarked paper, 34" perforation, leathertone
binding highlighted by gold graphics, stiff chipboard backs.
Efficiency* Series
16 lbs. paper, 3" perforation, green binding with black printing, chipboard backs.
Evidence Series
16 lbs. paper, 3" perforation, tan binding with brown printing, chipboard backs.

i

OPEN 7
DAYS A WEEK

__
;"
"
. ,

u

A

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan