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February 17, 1986 - Image 5

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The Michigan Daily, 1986-02-17

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Page 5 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, February i iY86
Zoning is hot issue in today's Third Ward City Council race

(Continued from Pate 1)
tment measured the house at over
6,000 square feet by including the attic
and basement. Thus, according to the
. revised zoning codes, the sorority's
use is legal.
But because the zoning change was
never discussed at a public meeting
such as the city council, as required
by state and local laws, the neighbors
consider the change illegal.
As a member of city council, Mid-
dleton voted for the conversion of the
house on Lincoln to group occupancy
status. As a result, she won the favor
of the University's Greek community.
Mary Beth Seiler, director of the
Panhellenic Association, which
governs the sororities at the Univer-

sity, wrote a letter endorsing Mid-
dleton's campaign.
"She (Richter) has been most
visible in her opposition to fraternities
and sororities, and her position on the
city council would have far-reaching
and negative consequences for
Greeks at U of M," the letter said.
"Additionally, Jeanette Middleton
has been an excellent and fair-minded
member of both city council and the
planning commission."
According to the letter, Middleton
did not ask for an endorsement. With
24 sororities and fraternities in the
Third Ward, the Greek community's
backing of Middleton could have a
large impact on the primary election.
"I welcome (the students') sup-

'Because I have a planning background
and the experience and knoweldge that a
city council member needs to judge the
city, I can help the city through this
critical growth stage.' -Donna Richter

only place where Greeks can ex-
pand."
To reduce the tension between the
planning commission and city
residents, Richter says she would like
to establish "citizen's councils" which
would review planning proposals
before the commission votes on them.
Although they differ on the zoning
issue, Richter and Middleton both op-
pose a proposal on the April ballot
that calls for a $3 million tax-bond
issue for road repair. Both candidates
say money for road improvements
should first come out of the city's
general fund before approaching tax-
payers.
Moreover, the candidates agree
that downtown development should be

encouraged, in particular, by ap-
proving a proposed convention center
at Huron, First, Ashley, and Ann
Streets.
And they both say the growing com-
petition for housing in the downtown
area must be addressed if the city
wants to bring in more business.
"It's more expensive, by about $20 a
square foot, to build housing down-
town than anywhere else in the city,"
Richter said. The city needs to
provide financial incentives to
developers who want to build housing
downtown, she said.
"Visitors will just frequent service
places like restaurants, but people
who love downtown will keep places
like Kline's in business," she added.

port," Middleton said, "and I need
their votes."
Richter says her no-vote was based
only on the issue of land-use, not just
the group that was caught in the mid-
dle. "It was nothing to do with anti-
Greek feelings," she said.
But Richter is still drawing op-

position from sororities and frater-
nities over her plan to prevent future
conversions of single and two-family
homes in the four-street area to group
dwellings.
Betsy French, Panhellenic's
representative to a zoning task force
reviewing Collegiate Sorosis's case,
said the current zoning area "is the

BUSINESS

Exper
NEW YORK (AP) - When Tylenol
capsules were tainted with cyanide
three years ago, the manufacturer
. won back consumers by making
packages tamper-resistant, and
marketing experts say the nation's
most popular painkiller should sur-
vive a new tampering incident.
Cyanide was found in two bottles of
Extra-Strength Tylenol capsules from
two stores in a New York City suburb,
and one death was blamed on the con-
taminated drug.
WHEN. seven people died after
taking cyanide-contaminated Tylenol
* in Illinois in 1982, many marketing
professionals said the brand was
dead. But Tylenol bounced back.
The death a week ago of 23-year-old
Diane Elsroth after taking a cyanide-
laced Tylenol capsule raised a new
question : Can Tylenol survive a
second scare?
Marketing analysts say yes, though
some expressed doubts about con-
tinued consumer acceptance of
Tylenol capsules.
THE easy-to-swallow capsules ac-
count for one-third of Tylenol sales.
The majority of the market is in
tablets and caplets, which are coated
tablets. They are harder to tamper
with than capsules because they are
solid, rather than grains of
medication in a soluble casing.
Jerry Fuller, who follows the
hospital supply business for the in-
vestment firm Duff & Phelps Inc. in
Chicago, called the outlook for
Tylenol capsules bleak, but said John-
son & Johnson's Tylenol brand would
survive.
The analysts uniformly cited the
management skills and marketing
savvy of Johnson & Johnson for their
(yi'v O vvT

ts say T
assessments of the durability of the
aspirin-free painkiller.
Following the Chicago deaths,
Johnson & Johnson set up consumer
hot lines, recalled 22 million bottles of
Tylenol capsules, answered 2,500
inquiries from reporters and joined an
industrywide effort to develop new
tamper-resistant packaging.
Johnson & Johnson estimates it
spent hundreds of millions of dollars
designing the triple-sealed package
which it used to bring back Tylenol
capsules in December 1982.
The incident knocked Tylenol from
its spot as the leader among over-the-
counter painkillers with 35 percent of
the market. Industry analysts said it
fell as low as an eight percent share.
BY the end of 1985, however,
Tylenol was back on top with 35 per-
cent of the $1.8 billion marker, accor-
ding to Joseph Riccardo of the in-
vestment firm Bear, Stearns & Co. in
New York.
After Elsroth's death, traced to
Tylenol purchased at a supermarket
in Bronxville, a New York City
suburb, Johnson & Johnson sprang in-
to action once again.
It halted production on Tylenol cap-
sules, boosting production of tablets
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lenol will survive poison scare

and caplets. It set up a hot line Mor
day evening, handling tens o
thousands of calls by the end of th
week. It collected Tylenol capsule
from retail outlets within three mile
of the store where the contaminate
capsules had been purchased an
helped analyze 200,000 of them.
ON Thursday, federal investigator
found a second Tylenol bottlerc
cyanide-contaminated capsules at
second store two blocks from the firs
Johnson & Johnson promptly urge
consumers not to use Tylenol capsul
until further notice and offered refur
ds.
GOING OVERSEAS?
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night & day tutorial classes
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Call 994-1456
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The company also offered a $100,000
reward for information about the
poisoner.
Johnson & Johnson has been "the
textbook example of corporate
responsibility," said Roger Black-
well, marketing professor at Ohio
State University. "If this were a
normal company with normal stan-
dards of ethics, I would have to write
them off, but this is Johnson & John-
son."
DAVID Williams, part owner of

New England Consulting Group in
Westport, Conn., predicted that
Tylenol capsules will remain in
demand, perhaps with new tamper-
resistant devices.
"Consumers have faith in branded
goods," he said. "They realize that
leading branding goods companies
are doing the best that can be done to
protect the consumer."

Johnson & Johnson's chairman,
James Burke, expressed confidence
Friday in the Tylenol brand, but said
he wanted to hear form consumers
before deciding on resuming produc-
tion of Tylenol capsules.
"The consumer is king in this coun-
try, and the consumer fooled ever-
body the last time," he said.

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THIS WEEK AT GUILD HOUSE
80 2 MONROE
' ANN ABOR, 'I4814
GUILD HOUSE
WRITERS SERIES
Monday, February 17 8:00 p.m

-

1.

JAMES CRUMP and CHARLES WASSERBURG
READING FROM THEIR WORKS
*Cpsponsored by the Michigan Student Assembly
FOR MORE INFO CALL 662-5189

February 21

Noon Forum

February 19

6-8 p.m.

203 E. Hoover
Ann Arbor, MI 48104
662-3149

"The Movement Behind
the Moral Majority"
SUSAN HARDING
Anthropology and
Residential College

RICE & BEANS NIGHT
$2 requested
Proceeds for material aid to
Central America.

I

West Palm Beac
NEW DC9-M81
SATURDAY DEPARTU
1oRAE 540-6700

TEACHING ASSISTANT
**** OPENINGS IN ****
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Summer 1986, Fall 1986, Winter 1986-87
pick up applications in the
Women's Studies Program Office
234 WEST ENGINEERING
763-2047
Applications DUE by 4 p.m. - Monday, March 3, 1986
7 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00a

'1

91P

1

8.

The Center for Western European Studies
announces the
SUMMER PROGRAM IN SEVILLE
JUNE 15 - JULY, 26, 1986
Classes in Spanish literature and linguistics, art history,
history or political science taught in English or Spanish
$1700 fee includes 6 upper-level credit hours of U-M tuitition,
lodging and some meals
For applications and further information, please
contact CWES, 5208 Angell Hall, 764-4311
___STEREO CENER-
SPRING BREAK SALE
10% OFF'
Walkmen. Portables & Accessories

KL4DRKING
RDR ENEFSY
NDERENDENCEI
N KONH SEURIY
AZNDA ,QJAT
EN FUDNENT
ON CAMPUS
FRIDAY
MARCH 7
Ask your Placement office for details on our upcoming
campus visit, or see our ad in this paper next Thursday,
February 24for additional information. LLNL is an equal
opportunity employer, mlf/h. U.S. citizenship is required.

Curtain Calling

For the serious theatre
student, Northwestern
offers a spectrum of
opportunities including a
Celebration ofMusical
Theatre and a Summer
Drama Festival
Students may perform in
a three-play, repertory
season-in workshops
that teach dance, scene
work and musical
comedy techniques-in
cabaret shows-in a
children's theatre
production.
Northwestern's
performing arts also
include other
opportunities such as
Mime, Acting,.Stagecraft,

JazzBand Community
Chorus, even Psychology
of Music
These and 240
other courses are
described in the 1986
SummerSession Course
Bulletin. Order your free
copy-including
register-by-mail forms
and information about
our new multi course
tuition discount for
visiting students.
8-week session,
June 23-August 16
6-week session,
June 23-August 2

r

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